Author Topic: USA in 6 months  (Read 12338 times)

jul

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USA in 6 months
« on: November 21, 2023, 01:45:56 pm »
Hi Americans   :)

If one day i'm decide to make a trip in USA by bike for 6 months, my question is:

What picturesque routes and places should not be missed ?

Thanks in advance   

John Saxby

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2023, 05:30:36 pm »
Here's a suggestion of a source on routes and maps:  ACA, the Adventure Cycling Association.  Wesbite: www.adventurecycling.org  On the menu bar, the heading "Navigate"  lists their resources on routes.

As a North American, I have friends and family in the States, and have travelled a lot Next Door on two wheels, both pedal-powered and motorized.

For the U.S., I have a tilt towards the Pacific northwest, and closer to home (in Ottawa), to the Adirondacks in northern NY state.

But, my preference is to follow the landforms, rather than the political boundaries:

In 2016, I did a rail-and-bike journey to, in, and from the Rocky Mountains, crossing the 49th parallel a couple of times enroute to the Pacific coast.  The ACA route map of the western portion of "The Northern Tier" (one the three trans-US routes ACA recommends) was very helpful.  Here's the journal of that ride:  www.cycleblaze.com/journals/rockies/ 

Note that AMTRAK is in my experience a good way to get around, with good discounts for people 65 & older.  The VIA Rail network in Canada is much more limited.

One of my most enjoyable routes was a 10-day circuit of the Gaspé Peninsula in SE Québec, the very end of the south shore of the St Lawrence.  If you go, the clockwise route allows you to descend grades as steep as 17 and 24%. My buddy on that trip lives in Manhattan, and has seen a lot of the world.  He said to me as we rode along, "John, this place is amazing -- it's utterly unlike anywhere else I've been."

If time allows a tour of 3-4 weeks: For me, Québec City is one of the magical places of the world.  And from there, one could cycle the North shore of the St Lawrence to Tadoussac (mouth of the Saguenay River) and beyond; and then take a ferry to the South Shore to make the circuit of the Gaspé.

Enjoy your planning & dreaming!

John
« Last Edit: November 21, 2023, 05:33:15 pm by John Saxby »

WorldTourer

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2023, 07:08:28 pm »
Hi Americans   :)

If one day i'm decide to make a trip in USA by bike for 6 months, my question is:

What picturesque routes and places should not be missed ?

Thanks in advance

Do you want to ride solely on asphalt, or also on gravel? Does some singletrack interest you? Especially for younger generations of riders, off-asphalt routes like the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route have become very popular. Easier camping and fewer cars than the ACA routes. In spite of the GDMBR’s name, it is a well-maintained gravel route that Thorn’s touring bikes can easily handle.

Recently the Western Wildlands route has been getting a lot of attention as a north-to-south traversal of the country off-asphalt, but its terrain means a need for thicker tires and less weight.

Besides those, Bikepacking.com has loads of route suggestions for the country.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2023, 07:10:22 pm by WorldTourer »

mickeg

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2023, 12:54:31 am »
As John S noted, there are good things to see in Canada, so do not limit yourself to USA.

Six months, would that be from mid spring to mid fall?  If so, avoid the south.


Danneaux

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2023, 01:53:36 am »
The deserts of America's Great Basin are pretty challenging in summer. Best to avoid unless well prepared/experienced dealing with extreme heat.

Best of luck on your plans, Julien. There's much to see in both the US and Canada and I'm sure you'd have a wonderful tour!

Dan.

jul

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2023, 03:54:48 pm »
Thank you for your suggestions   :)


So, the best way will be to combine the US with Canada..

Of course these countries are huge and the climate is different from one region to another.

However, if i focus on these two countries, is it possible to enjoy pleasant temperatures all year round ? (on 12 months)


And if yes, which parts would be most favorable from

Mid spring to mid Fall ?

then

Mid Fall to mid sping ?


@Mickeg, when you say "avoid the south" you mean the south of what ? from where to where precisely  ?

@Worldtourer, even if i can ride on the gravel roads or single tracks, it must be flat or with little positive elevation, because my bike and my things weigh are quite heavy.

As well, i don't know about Great Divide Mountain Bike Route, but i also like to cross regularly small city or village stopover, to supply myself with water and food.

@Dan, if the America's Great Basin are too hot in summer, i imagine the regions around is the same (Utha, Arizona, Colorado..)
So what is the adequate period to visit this area ?

Thanks in advance











Danneaux

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2023, 07:57:10 pm »
Quote
@Dan, if the America's Great Basin are too hot in summer, i imagine the regions around is the same (Utha, Arizona, Colorado..)
So what is the adequate period to visit this area ?
Julien,

The Great Basin is comprised of separately designated deserts and smaller basins but is generally regarded as a whole with somewhat ill-defined boundaries. The Great Basin is considered to be a "cold" desert because it can rain or snow there and when it is wet, it can quickly become impassable -- like trying to cycle or walk in pudding. There are hot springs which can be boiling and there is only a little drinkable water from springs, seeps, and areas where cattle graze. The problem is not so much contamination as excessive alkalinity, so I take pH test strips with me to check before drinking to avoid chemical burns inside.

The alkali dust of the playa/dry lake beds is very corrosive and attacks mucous membranes around the nose, lips, and mouth and causes a malady called "playa foot" where the skin can harden and split open from the extreme drying caused by prolonged exposure or walking barefoot or in sandals. The playa dust can and does blow in the wind and there are sometimes dust storms. It is highly abrasive and tends to collect in small crevices and on chains. I floss my chain with a mascara brush each night and freshly re-oil it before I go to sleep.

A good time to visit to avoid the greatest possibility of rain yet also avoid excess heat is, in my experience, from late April to mid-May and about 2-3 weeks after that. Early fall from late September into mid-November can work well also, but temperatures can drop to freezing or below. Winter can be a viable time to go provided you are prepared for cold temperatures and possible ice and snow, depending on the immediate area. The Warner Mountains are often snow-covered well into summer.

I often go in mid-summer, but special precautions must be taken to accommodate the heat and avoid dehydration. I generally do that by consuming 8.5l/day of water and/or water/electrolyte mix and figure 26.5l to be the minimum I need for 3 days' drinking and a little cooking. Water is heavy @ 1kg/l plus the container weight, so things add up quickly. There are no stores for resupply through most of the area and if you do find one that isn't closed, it is unlikely to have much more than a small petrol station would stock. For this reason, I usually carry about 2 weeks' supply of dehydrated food with me, counting in cattle troughs and my SteriPen for water resupply as needed.

There is no cellphone service through much of the area; where it is available, you can bet Verizon owns the towers, as they have the most "build-out" of tower coverage in the remote areas of the American West. Be prepared for injuries if they occur and you need to tend to them. For example, there are official roadside signs reminding travelers there are _no_ emergency services in all of Northern Washoe County in Nevada. When traveling there I take great care to avoid rolling and spraining an ankle while in camp -- a real possibility as badgers dig dens in the playa and the previous year's rains can smooth them over but not fill them in.

Often I will carry a "winter"-weight down sleeping bag in summer as temperatures can swing as much as 80 degrees F from daytime high to nighttime low and the "contrast" cold is something you can really feel (i.e. a drop from 123F down to 43F), especially if you are a bit dehydrated. It is wise to leave a copy of your planned route and itinerary with a trusted friend or loved one and a planned timeframe so if you don't return, someone can come looking for you. I always prepare electronic and paper packets with all that information so it can be transmitted or handed over to authorities if needed. "Authorities" might be local cattle ranchers who will "keep an eye out", as police and ranger patrols are few and far between if they happen at all. Last trip I made, a ranger tapped the map with his finger and warned, "Don't get hurt here. You _might_ see a car every 6 months to 2 years...but I wouldn't count on it". You can bet I take such advice seriously as a solo traveler. I tend to go cross-country and always take 2 GPS units as well as paper maps and (yes, really) a couple of compasses as backup. I've had the rubber switches of my Garmins perish due to the high UV exposure and then it is difficult to find the right-size twig to prod the electronics to life (and no, a conductive allen wrench doesn't work).

This Wikipedia entry may be helpful...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Basin_Desert

I would suggest you check Wikipedia in advance for most of the areas you are interested in touring, as the entries often contain climatological data.

Temperatures are indeed similar for the places you asked about...with the notable exception of Colorado, where it was 106 degrees F when I was at Mesa Verde and the next morning the highway was closed by a snowstorm. The climate can change rapidly where there are mountains.

Hopefully helpful,

Dan.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2023, 11:32:08 pm by Danneaux »

mickeg

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2023, 06:16:26 pm »
The south, pretty much the south half of continental USA would be a good place to avoid from Jun through September.

I say that with a very broad brush, as the eastern half of USA in the south will be much more humid than the west.

Are you familiar with dew point temperature and how that relates to how oppressive heat is?
https://www.weather.gov/arx/why_dewpoint_vs_humidity
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dew_point

On this forum I usually give SI units since most people here use those instead of the units common in USA.  But if you are in USA,you will have to become used to temperatures in Fahrenheit, so I am using that in this post. 

I avoid strong exertion when dewpoints are in the 70s or higher.  Dewpoint in the 60s, I sweat a lot on a bike, require more water, but I can perform well.  Dewpoints in the 50s or lower are quite comfortable for me, require less water.

And of course, the raw temperature comes into play, even in dry conditions (dewpoints in the 50s or lower) if the temperature is in the 90s or more, that will impair my performance on a bike.  Ideal is temp in the 70s and dewpoint in the 50s.

I assume you are familiar with this site, but I mention in case you are not.  This is my go to site for planning a trip and the likely weather I will encounter.
https://weatherspark.com/

You can pick a location, ideal is one with an airport for past weather data, and enter that location into the website.  I live in Madison Wisc, so I will use that:
https://weatherspark.com/y/12796/Average-Weather-in-Madison-Wisconsin-United-States-Year-Round

It is possible that when you are in Europe it lists the temperature in SI units (C) simply because it assumes you use those units, but the Madison site that I posted above lists the temperatures for me in F.

If you scroll down to the chart titled Humidity Comfort Levels in Madison, the color coding is based on dewpoint.

That website calls precipitation in a day of less than 1mm as not having had any precipitation, so the chart with probability of precipitation on any given day will slightly undercount actual.  That chart basically says that the months of July and first half of August have a change of being Oppressive or worse over 10 percent of the time.  That is not too bad, you can stop for a day if you feel like it.  So, I think bike touring in my area during any time in summer would not be bad.

I assume you already have a good feel for raw temperatures where you like to bike and where you feel it is too hot, so I am not discussing the second chart that shows average temperatures.  That of course is important, I just choose not to put much emphasis on it here since I suspect you already are well versed in that.

This past April, I did a tour from northern Mississippi to western Tennesee.  Mid-point is roughly Tupelo Mississippi.
https://weatherspark.com/y/146447/Average-Weather-at-Tupelo-Regional-Airport-Mississippi-United-States-Year-Round

In Tupelo in April, average high temperatures are in the 70s, average low is in the 50s to 60s, and the humidity chart says it will be mostly dry but occasionally comfortable to humid.

But looking at those temperature and humidity charts, July and Aug would be hot and also often oppressive humidity.  In other words, avoid that area during that time of the year.

I can't draw a line on a map and say when to go where, you will have to do that, but this website gives you a tool you can use.  That site also gives you good info for length of daylight hours, average wind direction and average wind speed.  I did that April trip with a friend.  In planning he was most insistent that we ride from northeast to southwest, I insisted on southwest to northeast.  If you look at the wind direction chart in April, 60 percent of the time we could expect a south or west wind, so I won the argument.

My two examples above (Madison and Tupelo) were in the eastern part of the country that is more humid in summer.  If you look at Denver Colorado:
https://weatherspark.com/y/145689/Average-Weather-at-Denver-International-Airport-Colorado-United-States-Year-Round

It is quite hot in summer in July, but the humidity is low enough that you should be able to ride without problem.

I probably emphasized dew point more than most people.  The reason that I focus so heavily on that is that dew point tells you approximately how cool an object will be if you wrapped a damp cloth around it.  It could be cooled down to roughly that temperature.  (Technically wet bulb temp and dewpoint are close, but not perfectly the same.)  Your skin is normally close to 70 degrees.  So, when you sweat, if the dewpoint is well below 70 degrees, the evaporative cooling from your sweat will cool you down very well.  But if the dew point is 70 degrees, your sweat has to be very efficient to cool your skin down to 70 degrees.  If the dew point is 80 degrees, sweating would not be able to cool your skin lower than 80 degrees, which is much hotter than normal for your skin temperature.

One rule of thumb might be to tour in areas where ACA is touring during that time of year.  They will pick the best times to tour in various locations.
https://www.adventurecycling.org/guided-tours/

On that list of tours, they listed Natchez Trace in March, April, and October.  My example with Tupelo location in this e-mail was for my ride this past April on Natchez Trace.  (I did not do it with ACA, but we saw them when we were there.)  So, ACA would not try to tour there in June through August, but May and September may be borderline months were you could do it but it would be hotter than ideal.

I spent more time writing this than I planned.   I hope it helps.

ACA also publishes bike maps for recommended routes and often those maps are for locations other than where they operate tours.  Some people find them to be very useful, I have not found them to be that great, but I will agree that their routes are very good for biking. Maps are not cheap.

Would you plan to buy a local (USA) sim card?  I do not know if your European phone would have the right frequencies in USA.  Perhaps others would know that better than me.  I use Puretalk for my phone.  They have a plan that is $20 a month (plus taxes on top of that) for both talk and a few gb of data, you can cancel at end of trip.  That company uses the ATT network.  My phone is 4g and works well, you do not need a 5g phone ... yet.
https://www.puretalk.com/cell-plans

A side note on USA and prices.  In Europe, when you are quoted a price on something, that price includes VAT tax.  In USA, there often is a local or state sales tax that is not included when you are quoted a price.  So, each time you buy something, expect a small surprise charge when you go to pay for it.  In my community the sales tax is 5.5 percent but it often is higher elsewhere.  Some things are generally not taxed, such as most foods in grocery stores, but each local will have different categories of what is taxed or not.

Some western states in USA have had forest fire problems in mid summer in past few years.  I won't elaborate more but just comment that it is something to be aware of.

mickeg

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2023, 06:26:59 pm »
One more thing, you will be in areas with lots of bugs.  Plan to buy a bottle of bug repellant when you arrive if you do not have some.  I use this stuff.
https://www.rei.com/product/887628/sawyer-picaridin-insect-repellent-lotion-4-fl-oz

Not every day will be buggy, but you will encounter them.

JohnR

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2023, 06:59:46 pm »
I'm not planning to do such a trip, but if I were then I would consider getting a phone or message device that works through satellite as a backup to a normal phone. Garmin make the inReach devices. Regarding normal cell phones, compatibility can be checked using the phone specs at https://www.gsmarena.com and the network info at https://www.phonearena.com/news/Cheat-sheet-which-4G-LTE-bands-do-AT-T-Verizon-T-Mobile-and-Sprint-use-in-the-USA_id77933. In general, the more expensive the phone then the more likely it is to cover a wider range of wireless frequencies.

John Saxby

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2023, 09:47:15 pm »
A few further thoughts on some of the points raised by George (mickeg) above. 

My cycling in N America has been confined to a band covering the more southerly parts of Canada (largely in Ontario, Qué., and the Maritimes), and the northerly parts of the U.S., largely in New York & New England.

Three broad topics:  Weather and wildfires; Bugs; and Wildlife (critters bigger than bugs).  All have their risks.  Equally, you can go cycling, so long as you're aware of those risks, and act accordingly.  I've added my advice on "what to do?" in the points below.

Weather and wildfires:
  • Summers have become hotter and more humid in the last couple of decades in Ottawa, where I live.  To the end of the 20th century, we used to see perhaps 5, at most 8 days above 30º C each summer.  We often exceed that number nowadays -- we often have 3-4 days of plus-30 weather at a stretch.
  • The "Humidex" in weather forecasts says what the summer temperatures "feel like".  It's not uncommon to see (& feel!) Humidex values exceeding 35, approaching 40 and even going beyond. Anything over 35 is uncomfortable and can be dangerous, especially if you're doing strenuous exercise.  Advice? I stay well hydrated, and stay within my physical limits.  Hilly country can be especially demanding.
  • In 2023, Canada's wildfire season was like no other. 185,000 sq kms of forest were burned between early March and mid-October, across the entire country, including north of the Arctic Circle.  That area was 5% of Canada's total forest cover, and is more than six times the long-term annual average.  "Normally", the fire season begins in May, not March.  And, in mid-October when the above figure was recorded, there were still nearly 800 fires burning, nearly half of them out of control.
  • In June of this year, wildfires in Ontario and Québec meant that cities like Toronto, Ottawa and New York had some of the worst air quality in the world. Our Air Quality Index is usually at 1 or 2 out of 10 -- that is, pretty good.  In early June it was 10+.
  • The weather we had in late June/early July dispelled the wildfire smoke and quelled the fires, but was dangerous in its own right:  torrential rain, hailstorms, and tornadoes. (!!)
  • Of course we don't know what 2024 and beyond will hold, but the Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs is arguing that as a country we must be ready for more of the same. My suggestion: follow weekly and monthly weather forecasts carefully, and plan your route accordingly.  If you're camping, be ready to seek shelter in hard accommodation.

Bugs:  (These could be included in "wildlife", but they deserve their own heading.)  This subject brings forth a lot of "our bugs are waaaay bigger and meaner than your bugs".  And humour too: on a visit to Yukon about 20 years ago, I saw (and regretted not buying) a great T-shirt with the title "Yukon Air Force" across the chest, and underneath, a drawing of a flock of huge mosquitos.

  • Mozzies in Eastern Canada and the US can, in my experience, be managed. I always carry repellent which includes up to 28% DEET.  When I'm in camp, that goes onto my clothing (near wrists and neck) and my hat, but not onto my skin.  Nylon clothing doesn't like it, either.  What to do?  In camp, I wear long sleeves and long pants, and I always carry a headnet (also called a bug veil).
  • There is one bug for which I've never seen anything that matches its bite. (I've lived and/or worked for years in Southern Africa and Brazil, and have visited India, Australia, and much of Europe.)  This savage brute is the black fly.  Wade Hemsworth's old song describes it well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjLBXb1kgMo
  • Black flies are to be found in the forests of Ontario, Québec, and the Maritimes, and in upper NY state and Maine, especially in late spring and early summer.  If you are a cyclist camping in blackfly country, you cannot avoid them.  In my experience, there is no fully effective protection against the creatures.  They seem to thrive on chemical repellents.  A headnet over your hat is essential.  And, long-sleeved shirts buttoned at the wrists and neck, combined with pants tucked into socks, provide some protection.  My approach is to stay out of the woods for the first three weeks of June.
Wildlife:
  • Bears: Black bears are to be found all across Canada.  If you're in a campground, the people in charge will let you know about the local population.  I've never had any problems with black bears in 40-odd years of camping in Ontario.  That may be because I never keep food or scented cosmetics, toothpaste, etc., in my tent. When I'm cycling, my food and related bags go into the campground's washroom block, or into a locker if one is provided. Or, on top of the roof of the toilets.
  • Brown bears:  In Western Canada, you may encounter brown bears (usually grizzlies) as well.  On a cycling trip through the Canadian Rockies and the US Pacific Northwest in 2016, I saw one of these crossing the road, and on another occasion, a black bear.  In Canada, the campgrounds I stayed at had protective fences and gates to exclude bears.  My journal of that trip is available here: www.cycleblaze.com/journals/rockies/
  • Raccoons are more likely than bears to pose a problem for cyclists who are camping.  These wee creatures are smart as well as cute, and they have very sharp claws and teeth which will make a mess of any tent or pannier.  The same rules apply as for black bears, only more so, because raccoons are much more commonly found in or near campgrounds:  keep all food & cosmetics well away from your tent, ideally in a building where the doors are closed at night. (The campground should be able to guide you.) 
  • Moose, elk and deer command a lot of attention for some folks, but as a cyclist I've had very little experience with any of them.  That said, when I was riding my motorcycles, I was ultra-cautious at dusk and dawn. When I'm cycle-touring, I'm in camp at those times. In marshy areas in our extended neighbourhood, there are road signs to alert drivers to watch out for moose.

Hope this is helpful.  Don't get overwhelmed by any of the above -- you can plan accordingly, though the weather is now more of an Unknown.  The biggest risks I've encountered come from motorists... 

Good luck, and let us know how your Grand Project develops.

« Last Edit: December 14, 2023, 11:49:43 pm by John Saxby »

mickeg

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2023, 01:00:48 pm »
A few further thoughts on some of the points raised by George (mickeg) above. 
...
...

Oh my gosh, that place sounds terrible.  I would never go there.  <Insert chuckle here.>  Oops, I do that often.

***

The repellant I suggested is based on Picaridin.  John suggested repellant based on Deet.

Deet can damage plastics, but Picaridin does not harm your equipment.

On my Canadian Maritimes trip, I used the Picaridin based repellant (lotion, not spray) and there was only one time where I felt it was lacking.  On that occasion I used a tiny bit of a Deet based repellant that is 100 percent Deet that I bought decades ago.

Most bike jerseys use knit fabrics, bugs can easily bite through that fabric.  If they are bad when you get to a campsite, shed the jersey and as John suggested, us a long sleeve shirt that has a tight weave.

That said, bugs like mosquitos can be quite thick but often are nearly totally absent.  So, assume that most days you will not notice bugs at all. 

But there will on rare occasion be days like in the first attached photo, I was in my tent in early morning when I took the photo, the mosquitos were outside my tent door waiting for me to open the door and let them in for breakfast.

Last summer in late August and early September, I did a 13 day long backpacking trip in Northern Minnesota, I only used repellant one day, hiking through a marsh where the bugs were quite bad.  But every other day, I never bothered.

But, I grew up in Minnesota, and multi-generation Minnesotans naturally taste bad to mosquitos.  When mosquitos bite babies and small children, if they taste good they carry them off to eat later.  But small children that taste bad are left behind, and those are the Minnesotans that reproduce for future generations.  Thus, after several generations, Minnesotans have evolved to be bad tasting to most bugs.

The entire previous paragraph was a lie, I hope you laughed when you read it.

***

Food in campsites, it is rare for critters to be troublesome, but it does happen. 

One place I was camping two years ago had a legal requirement for food protection against black bears, this was a backpacking and canoeing area, not a car camping area.  One option was hanging food from a tree, 10 feet off the ground, 6 feet from the tree trunk.  Other option was a bear resistant container and there was a list of approved containers. 

I used an Ursack which is on the approved list.  It is a Kevlar sack.  And I put the food in a dry bag inside the Ursack to limit odor.  A bear can crush the food in the sack, but they can't open it to eat it, so they do not get trained to look for food in campsites.  Because they can crush your food, you still should take other precautions where practical, like hanging food in bear areas.

But the reason I mention it is because an Ursack will keep racoons, squirrels, chipmunks, ravens, etc., out of your food.  Since I have one (they are not cheap) I now carry it on a bike tour, not so much for bear protection but for other critter protection.  In the second photo it is the sack hanging in the tree above my bike.  While this photo was taken in a state park where bears may be present, my main concern was smaller critters.

I am not specifically recommending that you get one, just mentioning it as an option.  I have never seen another person on a bike tour use one.  They used to be available in white or black but now they appear to only be sold in black.  A good dry bag like kayakers use with heavy plastic coated fabrics that is heat sealed at the seams will often be adequate for other small critters and is much cheaper than an Ursack. 

Have a great trip.

John Saxby

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2023, 02:55:56 pm »
Great stuff, George.

I rarely light a fire when camping, but did so once to test the reputed use of DEET-based repellent as a fire starter.  Yep -- but stand well back if there's any spark or flame. (!!)

More on black flies:  the story is that railway workers in the mid-19th century used the indigenous peoples' method of a smudge pot to keep the critters at bay.  A smudge pot is a pail loaded with moss, which is then set alight. The smoke, 'tis said, offered protection against black flies. (Not sure why Wade Hemsworth's song doesn't mention this...)

Not easy to carry on a bike, though.

Cheers,  John

JohnR

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2023, 05:59:44 pm »
But, I grew up in Minnesota, and multi-generation Minnesotans naturally taste bad to mosquitos.  When mosquitos bite babies and small children, if they taste good they carry them off to eat later.  But small children that taste bad are left behind, and those are the Minnesotans that reproduce for future generations.  Thus, after several generations, Minnesotans have evolved to be bad tasting to most bugs.

The entire previous paragraph was a lie, I hope you laughed when you read it.
Yes, it made me chuckle, although there might well be an element of Darwinian evolution involved.

mickeg

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Re: USA in 6 months
« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2023, 09:35:24 pm »
...
I rarely light a fire when camping, but did so once to test the reputed use of DEET-based repellent as a fire starter.  Yep -- but stand well back if there's any spark or flame. (!!)
...

If you used the spray, it could have been the propellant.