Author Topic: First oil change  (Read 1345 times)

WorldTourer

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2024, 04:53:26 pm »
Rohloff has said that any hub can be expected to sweat some oil, and the hub is adequately lubricated by less than the indicated replacement volume, so leaks are not necessarily a sign of a problem.

Oil can also leak through the interface to the external gear mech, which is held in place by screws and paper gaskets. I installed this part myself when upgrading from the internal gear mech. Since I have noticed a slightly higher amount of leaked oil since then, I intend to eventually turn to the local authorized Rohloff service provider and have them redo the process.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2024, 05:03:29 pm by WorldTourer »

geocycle

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2024, 05:34:43 pm »
Thatís a useful picture.  The original oil was indeed very black.  I was surprised when I got a new batch how much it has changed. At the time I wondered if it had altered in some way during the 15 years it lasted me but the pic from PH confirms that was not the case. My 18 year old hub is now leaking quite a lot and is about to go to Somerset for some TLC.  Just want to see out the worst of February first as the RST is my commuter.
Interesting points. Thanks.
My hub is 12+ years old. No leaks yet. Any idea why yours is leaking?
What repairs do you think SJS will carry out?

Iím used to the misting and drip via the skewer or  occasional around the inner cable mechanism but recently even a slight lean and the oil leaves a pool on the floor or on the wheel rim. I did a careful oil change to check Iíd not messed up the last one, changed all the paper gaskets and checked the bolts.  It seems to even come through the shell where the large gasket is.  My best guess is the seals need replacing. While it is there Iíll have a new rim fitted, the css carbide has worn off and itís not braking well even with softer compound blocks. Still not bad for the vintage!

Matt
 

mickeg

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2024, 06:00:28 pm »
Thatís a useful picture.  The original oil was indeed very black.  ...

Ok, they must have changed the formula over a year ago.  I bought my hub in early 2013, and I think mine came out of the factory only a few months before it reached my hands.

Perhaps it also had some graphite in the oil back then, that would have added black to the color?

PH

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2024, 08:17:21 pm »
...recently even a slight lean and the oil leaves a pool on the floor or on the wheel rim.
My oldest hub is also leaking, I assume from the main bearing seal, it's been doing it for a few years and I keep meaning to get it sorted, I've just done more oil changes if the miles warrant it and hope there's always enough oil clinging to the parts that need it.   At one time you could buy the kit and do it yourself, I don't know why they stopped selling that, it seems a straightforward job, though there are those can mess anything up.
Quote
While it is there Iíll have a new rim fitted, the css carbide has worn off and itís not braking well even with softer compound blocks. Still not bad for the vintage!
My last carbide rim is on the front of my Mercury, I'm hoping it'll outlast me!  What's it look like when the carbide wears off?  I'd assumed it went all the way through.  Still 18 years is a good run for any rim.  My Raven went through it's first in under two, can't remember what that was, Sun 18 sounds familiar.

Andre Jute

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2024, 12:05:48 am »
Thatís a useful picture.  The original oil was indeed very black.  ...

Ok, they must have changed the formula over a year ago.  I bought my hub in early 2013, and I think mine came out of the factory only a few months before it reached my hands.

Perhaps it also had some graphite in the oil back then, that would have added black to the color?

Rohloff oil is a fixed, same formulation, only as long as any batch lasts. Every time a new batch is made, the formulation changes on hand of what is available and presumably also on hand of developing information flowing from dealers and hubs returned to factory, plus from riders. This isn't unique to Rohloff: even big name motor oils from major vertically integrated brands (meaning they find, extract and refine their own oil and are thus in detailed control of the mixture in the retail can) is subject to creeping development on the pattern and for the same reasons as Rohloff. I don't know a great deal about oil chemistry but I do remember an Atlas Copco general manager once telling me that the sulphur content of oils from a particular region was higher than anywhere else in the world. If Shell and Mobil etc cannot guarantee the exact, precise same oil from year to year at the point of sale, it follows that Rohloff cannot either. But why should they want to? The oils available to them are not likely to be a retrograde; quite the opposite, they are likely to be better at any step, though probably also more expensive.

On the difference in colour between the cleaning oil and the all-seasons oil straight from the bottle: Heavy crude is black because of the way it is formed from plant matter by time and pressure. At each successive stage of refinement it gets thinner and greyer, until it is very thin and clear. I suspect that both the Rohloff oils would be described by an engineer as "light machine oils" but the cleaning/low temperature oil is lighter because it so thin from further refining than the darker all-seasons oil, each further stage of refinement removing more impurities and therefore becoming more translucent.

Rohloff itself has told us something about their oil, specifically in the warning not to put any old automobile or other non-Rohloff oil in their hub: they need to specify it so that it works with Rohloff's weight-saving filter scheme.

Andyb1

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #20 on: February 14, 2024, 08:30:31 pm »
Usually there isn't much old oil left in the hub to come out, are you trying to drain it?  I tried once without much success, enough to dirty the tube but none made it to the syringe.

After a 20 mile ride I removed the plug, put a little plastic container between the spokes and left it to drain, occasionally turning the wheel a little either way and also leaning the bike sideways.   Got quite a lot out, not far off 125ml.  Then flushed it.  Seemed better to add flushing oil once I had got as much oil out as possible,

mickeg

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #21 on: February 14, 2024, 10:01:08 pm »
...
After a 20 mile ride I removed the plug, put a little plastic container between the spokes and left it to drain, occasionally turning the wheel a little either way and also leaning the bike sideways.   Got quite a lot out, not far off 125ml.  Then flushed it.  Seemed better to add flushing oil once I had got as much oil out as possible,

I assume you meant 25ml, not 125.

crg

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2024, 09:05:43 am »
Thatís a useful picture.  The original oil was indeed very black.  ...

Ok, they must have changed the formula over a year ago.  I bought my hub in early 2013, and I think mine came out of the factory only a few months before it reached my hands.

Perhaps it also had some graphite in the oil back then, that would have added black to the color?

Rohloff oil is a fixed, same formulation, only as long as any batch lasts. Every time a new batch is made, the formulation changes on hand of what is available and presumably also on hand of developing information flowing from dealers and hubs returned to factory, plus from riders. This isn't unique to Rohloff: even big name motor oils from major vertically integrated brands (meaning they find, extract and refine their own oil and are thus in detailed control of the mixture in the retail can) is subject to creeping development on the pattern and for the same reasons as Rohloff. I don't know a great deal about oil chemistry but I do remember an Atlas Copco general manager once telling me that the sulphur content of oils from a particular region was higher than anywhere else in the world. If Shell and Mobil etc cannot guarantee the exact, precise same oil from year to year at the point of sale, it follows that Rohloff cannot either. But why should they want to? The oils available to them are not likely to be a retrograde; quite the opposite, they are likely to be better at any step, though probably also more expensive.

On the difference in colour between the cleaning oil and the all-seasons oil straight from the bottle: Heavy crude is black because of the way it is formed from plant matter by time and pressure. At each successive stage of refinement it gets thinner and greyer, until it is very thin and clear. I suspect that both the Rohloff oils would be described by an engineer as "light machine oils" but the cleaning/low temperature oil is lighter because it so thin from further refining than the darker all-seasons oil, each further stage of refinement removing more impurities and therefore becoming more translucent.

Rohloff itself has told us something about their oil, specifically in the warning not to put any old automobile or other non-Rohloff oil in their hub: they need to specify it so that it works with Rohloff's weight-saving filter scheme.

I was under the impression that the oil is synthetic and hence not varying in composition. Color could be from additives.

Matt2matt2002

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2024, 11:51:56 am »
...
After a 20 mile ride I removed the plug, put a little plastic container between the spokes and left it to drain, occasionally turning the wheel a little either way and also leaning the bike sideways.   Got quite a lot out, not far off 125ml.  Then flushed it.  Seemed better to add flushing oil once I had got as much oil out as possible,

I assume you meant 25ml, not 125.

That's a nice tip. Small plastic container between the spokes and tipping / leaning the bike.
I usually leave the syringe tube attached over night to drain onto tissues.
I'll try your tip next oil change.
Thanks

Matt
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

Andyb1

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2024, 04:35:00 pm »
...
After a 20 mile ride I removed the plug, put a little plastic container between the spokes and left it to drain, occasionally turning the wheel a little either way and also leaning the bike sideways.   Got quite a lot out, not far off 125ml.  Then flushed it.  Seemed better to add flushing oil once I had got as much oil out as possible,

I assume you meant 25ml, not 125.

No, I meant 12.5ml.
It was difficult knowing exactly what volume came out as a little spilled, but when I later poured the drained oil into the empty little bottle that the new oil had come in there was around 10ml.  The hub is 1 year old, does not leak, so I guess 12.5ml of oil was originally in it?

UKTony

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #25 on: February 15, 2024, 07:26:48 pm »
 Iím assuming that the 10ml you got out was before you flushed so didnít include cleaning oil. If your hub is a year old then it predates last October when Rohloff  announced it was acceptable to halve  the amount of new oil that should be put into the hub, at the recommended service intervals, to 12.5ml. Therefore  I imagine that the hub would have had  25ml  rather than 12.5ml put in after manufacture and before sale to you a year ago. . Rohloff say that about 12ml of oil will always stick to the  components inside the hub so on that basis the 10ml you extracted sounds ok to me.

Andre Jute

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Re: First oil change
« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2024, 05:05:49 am »
I was under the impression that the oil is synthetic and hence not varying in composition. Color could be from additives.

Synthetic or organic, generally speaking all oils have some additives, so your point would apply in both cases. It's a very good point though, because the other thing obvious to me is that Rohloff wants to keep control of the oil put into their hubs precisely so that they can first discover that the filters in the hub will not be destroyed by either the native "extras" in the oil or the additives the oil company chemists used to make the oil and its derivatives potable for modern machinery, and even human application.* That was the import of my remark about relative amounts of sulphur in oils sourced from different parts of the globe.

* In having some kind of a growth cut off the back of my hand, I discovered something amazing about one oil by-product, Vaseline. The surgeon insisted I put Vaseline on the three inch long scar sewn up on the back of my hand. To my amazement it worked, in that together with the Mohs stitching (praised by the nurse who took out the stitches, who previously worked in cosmetic surgery) it has caused the scar to become entirely invisible. Vaseline by smell seems related to the kerosene I burn in the heating boiler, but I've now replaced my lifelong skin cream, Johnson's Baby Lotion, with Vaseline. All the same, I'm not about to try Vaseline as a packing for the EXT box on my Rohloff...
« Last Edit: February 16, 2024, 12:29:44 pm by Andre Jute »