Author Topic: Chain reversal  (Read 3368 times)

Matt2matt2002

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Chain reversal
« on: May 09, 2014, 11:10:05 am »
I am about to buy a new chain for my Raven.
I will keep the old one and perhaps do a swop every so often to even out wear on the chains.

How do I mark the chain so that I know which way is which?
Am I correct in thinking the chains can be 'flipped' in the same way the front and rear drives can?

Matt
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

julk

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Re: Chain reversal
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2014, 12:22:51 pm »
Matt,
if you have the right size chainring and rear sprocket invest in a chainglider.
This could then be the last new chain you need to buy…
Julian.

Andre Jute

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Re: Chain reversal
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2014, 02:37:58 pm »
 
+1

Andybg

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Re: Chain reversal
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2014, 02:44:35 pm »
Unless you have changed the gearing matt it was a 38/17 so could take a chainglider although I am not sure if the chainring is thin enough - you may need to change to a surly ring

Andy

Matt2matt2002

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Re: Chain reversal
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2014, 11:25:51 pm »
OK. You've got me thinking about the glider.
But back to the chain question. How best t keep track of chain side/direction between swops?
M
And, no, Andy. I haven't changed rings. Although you kindly gave me a very large spare front one. With such a slack chain I thought it may be a handy swap. But too large, without adjusting the BB
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

sd

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Re: Chain reversal
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2014, 04:51:27 pm »
Matt,
if you have the right size chainring and rear sprocket invest in a chainglider.
This could then be the last new chain you need to buy…
Julian.

I am really struggling with this one. Assuming Rohloff how and why will the chain last forever. I assume you are not including the chain wheel and sprocket? Next what is chainglider? Could you supply a link to a chainglider?  Thanks SD

sd

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Re: Chain reversal
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2014, 05:05:49 pm »
Sorted found a chainglider. Can I assume by keeping the chain clean reduce ware? And the same will apply to the sprocket/chainwheel? Is it noisy? How will changing chains regularly stop the chain wheel/sprocket waring out ignoring dirt? I am a fan of investing to save!
PS The following is straight forward bragging!!

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/301177226491?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

http://msgbikes.com/bike-specifications/santos-custom-built-travelmaster-2-6-alu-shimano



julk

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Re: Chain reversal
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2014, 10:37:38 pm »
In my experience the wear on a chain is mainly caused by dirt/grit/water thrown up by the wheels which sticks to the oil on the chain and making a very effective grinding paste. It also results in a lot of work trying to clean it all off and replacing components as they wear.
The other cause of wear is the chain shifting sideways in a derailleur setup.

Running a hub gear or single speed eliminates the chain shifting wear.
Enclosing the chain in a chain case keeps it clean and thus eliminates the main source of wear.

I would expect using a chaincase like the chainglider to make the transmission components last 4 times longer, but I have not had one long enough to prove this.