Author Topic: Conversion chain to Belt Nomad MK2  (Read 4513 times)

jul

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Re: Conversion chain to Belt Nomad MK2
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2023, 09:32:06 pm »
[quote author=DIAGMONKEY
I would probably email to Thorn and ask them for advice, I would think they would have a good idea if adding a splitter would cause any problems with the frame. They do now sell some belt drive bikes and parts, so may have already worked out some good solutions. Looks like it could end up being quite an expensive conversion, best to as sure as you can that things will go smoothly before having the frame work done.
[/quote]

Yes, I agree and it's planned
« Last Edit: September 14, 2023, 09:35:47 pm by jul »

mickeg

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Re: Conversion chain to Belt Nomad MK2
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2023, 11:14:56 pm »
I do not recall if Pink Bunny did the Veer belt and if so what type of bike?

Julien,

You can avoid much of the trouble and expense of a Gates conversion if you wish to consider the "splittable" belt drive offered by Veer. No frame modification required.

Do a search of the Forum archives for "veer" (no quotes) and you'll see past posts about this. Company website here... https://www.veercycle.com/

Best, Dan

Found it.   A Mercury.
http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=14076.0


PH

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Re: Conversion chain to Belt Nomad MK2
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2023, 09:20:18 am »
Do a search of the Forum archives for "veer" (no quotes) and you'll see past posts about this. Company website here... https://www.veercycle.com/

Best, Dan
Just had a look at that and the linked threads with experience.  By my rough calculations it's nine times more expensive than using a chain.  450 V's 50 for chain, half sprocket and half chainring. I'm comfortable getting 20,000 km per chain so for the Veer to make economic sense it would need to last 180,000 km.  I know, I know, money isn't everything, I'm still curious, just not that curious. 
There does seem to be a big price difference between the consumer and OEM prices, the difference between chain and belt bikes is far less than between the drivetrain systems.  Maybe I'll satisfy my curiosity with a new bike!

mickeg

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Re: Conversion chain to Belt Nomad MK2
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2023, 12:54:23 pm »
Do a search of the Forum archives for "veer" (no quotes) and you'll see past posts about this. Company website here... https://www.veercycle.com/

Best, Dan
Just had a look at that and the linked threads with experience.  By my rough calculations it's nine times more expensive than using a chain.  450 V's 50 for chain, half sprocket and half chainring. I'm comfortable getting 20,000 km per chain so for the Veer to make economic sense it would need to last 180,000 km.  I know, I know, money isn't everything, I'm still curious, just not that curious. 
There does seem to be a big price difference between the consumer and OEM prices, the difference between chain and belt bikes is far less than between the drivetrain systems.  Maybe I'll satisfy my curiosity with a new bike!

When I built up my Nomad Mk II, I compared the Nomad against the Co-Motion Pangea (a bike make in Oregon, USA).  My shopping list included S&S couplers, Rohloff frame, steel, built for heavy touring with 26 inch wheels.  Co-Motion offered the belt option or chain, but I decided I wanted chain instead of belt.  I have commented many times that for touring, I want a 36T chainring (16T sprocket) and for unladen biking near home instead want a 44T chainring.  Belt would effectively lock me into a single gear range.

I chose the Nomad Mk II on price in that comparison.  And later when I chose to set it up with a suspension fork, I was happier with my choice.  I had not considered suspension fork before I bought it, but for a mountain bike trip, that was a big plus.  The Pangea would not work with a suspension fork.