Author Topic: Chain Cleaners  (Read 2840 times)

tt2cycletours

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Chain Cleaners
« on: June 05, 2014, 06:49:27 PM »
Hi,

My Parktools chain cleaner has finally fallen apart; it cracked a while ago..  :(  Lasted several years but still dissapointing.

Any advice on a chain cleaner made of metal so the degreasers don't destroy it.

Alternatives??

:)

Daniel Beckham

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2014, 02:16:26 PM »
I see this has not been responded to and is probably too late, but you never know this may help.

I have used a couple of Muc Off ones which are OK but the cleaning ability is limited. Nothing beats removing the chain using a quick link and cleaning in a tank (like the one Machine Mart sell) or a tin filled with de greaser and scrub with a washing up brush on all sides before running under the tap and drying off. Thoroughly clean the chain wheels using degreaser and or brake cleaner and clean the rear cassette with a stiff brush and a thick boot lace pulled in between the cogs. Clean each jockey wheel and re fit the chain before oiling each link individually. I find the Muc Off wet lube works the best and is nice to apply.

tt2cycletours

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2015, 07:26:20 PM »
Thanks for the reply; interesting approach.

I usually keep it on the bike and use the chain cleaner twice (a new lot of finishline degreaser).  If I eliminate any grit sound I consider this OK although I wonder if I should follow your method.

I have started using quick links - very convenient.

Danneaux

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2015, 08:06:22 PM »
Thanks, Daniel, for catching this unsanswered query; nice.  :)

As a data point, I prefer an all-metal ExploSafe solvent dash tank instead of a chain-mounted cleaning device. I just remove the chain and place it on the spring-supported screen, then dash the platform and chain into mineral spirits. The platform then rises above the solvent and the excess can drain into the bottom tank. A couple-three dashes does a remarkable job removing most grit, but I use an old battery-powered electric toothbrush and one of my sister's old mascara brushes to clean any remaining deposits in nooks and crannies. A shot of compressed air removes any remaining solvent, leaving the chain clean and dry, awaiting lube. The old solvent goes to the solvent recyclers when it gets too grungy.

This has worked well for me the last 35 years. Much easier and faster now quick-links have been invented.

Best,

Dan.

Bill C

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2015, 05:46:07 PM »
i use 2 old pop bottles
clean worst of muck off the chain with some old towel while it's still on the bike
remove chain thread it into one of the pop bottles add 1/2 a pint of paraffin replace bottle lid and GENTLY swirl the paraffin around the chain, once the paraffin has removed most of the crud empty and strain it through a funnel with an old bit of t shirt as a filter into a receptacle, then once filtered put cleaned paraffin back in bottle and readgitate, repeat till no more grit is in the paraffin
cut top off bottle to remove chain then wipe it off with clean rag,
finally add 1/2 a pint of panelwipe into the second bottle repeat the process
then hang the chain for an hour or so to let the chain dry/panelwipe evaporate
then it's all clean and degreased ready for lubing and reinstalling

the paraffin and panelwipe can be reused a few times if filtered properly

if the chain is really ganked then i run it through an ultrasonic cleaner while it's still in the paraffin bottle stage

doubt anyone else will take to it but it works for me  ;D

as for lube i like tf2 extreme wet

Danneaux

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2015, 07:15:15 PM »
Quote
i use 2 old pop bottles...it works for me
...And works *great*! I've sometimes done this on a long tour, and it works fine.

It also works with citrus-based cleaner in the bottles of parrafin/mineral spirits are not available. One bottle is much better than none, not as good as two.

I've also sometimes stopped by a car-repair shop and asked nicely if I could use the mechanic's dash tank. Never bee refused; most are intrigued enough it is hard to dissuade them from "helping".  :D

All the best,

Dan.

Matt2matt2002

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2015, 10:32:15 PM »
As a chain-glider user, I cannot possibly comment on this thread.
 ;D
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

Danneaux

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2015, 10:47:34 PM »
Quote
As a chain-glider user, I cannot possibly comment on this thread.
Well!

 ;D

All the best,

Dan.

tt2cycletours

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2015, 10:17:05 PM »
Just to say thanks for the info - I really thought I had nailed the process with my expensive Parktools chain-cleaner... maybe not ;)


John Saxby

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Re: Chain Cleaners
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2015, 10:53:36 PM »
The, ah, "solution" I liked best was the recommendation (on a crazyguy thread on the subject) to use straight lemon juice.  Might require touring along the Med to ensure a steady supply, but smells good to me.  Mind you, like Matt, for me as a 'glider guy it's a cow's opinion (i.e., a moot point)  :-)