Author Topic: Repairing Punctures  (Read 1537 times)

Tiberius

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Re: Repairing Punctures
« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2017, 05:50:15 AM »
Has anyone experience of glueless patches either as a permanent repair or as a stop gap whilst out on the road? Whilst on the road I always carry a spare inner tube and have used a traditional puncture repair kit when I get home.

Id.

From what I can gather, from a number of cycling forums, the glueless patch kits are generally frowned on by the cycling community. These patches are considered to be unreliable.

However, that is not my experience. I have used this little kit for a number of years and I have not had one single failure.


http://www.wiggle.co.uk/park-tool-puncture-repair-kit-super-patch/?lang=en&curr=GBP&dest=1&sku=1260769680&kpid=1260769680&utm_source=google&utm_term&utm_campaign=UK_PLA_Accessories&utm_medium=base&utm_content=mkwid%7CsAC0UnO8T_dc%7Cpcrid%7C67090793102%7Cpkw%7C%7Cpmt%7C%7Cprd%7C1260769680uk


I do carry spare tubes but for puncture repairs I use the little Park kit EXCLUSIVELY...I never carry a 'traditional' repair kit anymore as I simply don't need to.

As ever, preparation is everything....plenty of cleaning with the sandpaper. Then on with the patch and press for 30 seconds or so. Job done.

I have a serious lack of patience with anything that is unreliable. If these things didn't work I wouldn't use them....simple as that.

This is just my experience, others WILL disagree..... :)












martinf

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Re: Repairing Punctures
« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2017, 08:44:14 AM »
I tried glueless patches a few years back after recommendation by the mechanic at my LBS.

They worked, but I didn't see that there was much gain in time over the traditional glue and patch system, which has always worked very well for me.

I used to patch tubes until it was "patches on patches", nowadays I discard tubes after a few patches.

Anyway, I have far fewer punctures nowadays, the tyres (mostly Schwalbe) are more puncture resistant than those I used 20-30 years ago (mostly Michelin). Probably just the evolution of bicycle tyre technology rather than anytthing to do with the brands.

When I do get a puncture (most often on one of my Bromptons with lightweight Kojak tyres) I have 4 different ways of dealing with it :

- if slow puncture close to home, pump, ride, pump, ride, and repair comfortably at home.
- if not a slow puncture or a long way from home :
      (i) if rain or cold or inner tube badly damaged, remove wheel, remove tyre, replace inner tube. Preferably in a bus shelter or similar if I can find one.
      (ii) if rear wheel, remove most of one side of the tyre WITHOUT removing the wheel, patch with traditional glue patches, refit tyre. Saves mucking about with the chain. On a bike with a Chainglider I actually find it easier to deal with a rear wheel tyre or tube replacement, as the front part of the Chainglider keeps the chain tidy, but I haven't yet had a roadside puncture on any of my 3 Chainglider equipped bikes.
      (iii) if front wheel, remove wheel, remove tyre, patch with traditional glue patches, refit tyre.

In all cases, before patching or changing the tube I check the inside of the tyre, visually and/or by touch, to remove the thorn, glass fragment or metal fragment if it is still there. This is obviously less thorough when I patch a rear inner tube without removing the wheel, but has worked OK for me so far.


sd

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Re: Repairing Punctures
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2017, 02:07:12 PM »
I had a horrendous experience once with a puncture. I have a kalkhoff pedelec with a Shimano 8 speed hub. The bike is for pulling a trailer, mainly for the dog when she is working. I could not get the wheel off, in fact I knackered up the gears (not a major repair) I now have the knack of getting it off (small screw driver) but getting it back in again is still a real problem. I used to use slime in inner tubes but that was useless as it still punctured and you couldn't repair it. Turns out you are not supposed to repair it just pump it back up again and it repairs itself? Is that right? Either way while it was in the shop I had them put the gunk/slime in. I ended up pushing it 4-5 miles home that night with the trailer attached (14.5kilos) and the dog walked.
I have marathon plus on for the summer and schwalbe spikes for all the winter. Hopefully the slime and a co2 gas pump for any punctures will sort it. I don't need to be sorting out punctures on rear tyre with shimano hub gears on dark winters night. So much easier with Rohloff.
PS I just use Wilko patches or any other with red bit around the outside. Will go out and squeeze the air out of the tube glue in a minute!

sd

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Re: Repairing Punctures
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2017, 02:36:29 PM »
PS any other things I can do, to not get a puncture or to repair it without taking of the back wheel. An example
 http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bicycle-Bike-Tire-Liner-Puncture-Proof-Pad-Inner-Pad-Anti-Thorn-Protection-2Pcs/252948588413?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&var=551972929270&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649
I will be changing to spikes as soon as we get a temperature of 4c or less and they will Stay on for the winter. I think i have felt pad running around the inside the tyres on one bike.

sd

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Re: Repairing Punctures
« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2017, 08:00:29 AM »
Look at the reviews for the slime tyre liners. They cause punctures😨

https://www.evanscycles.com/slime-tyre-liner-00120650