Author Topic: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft  (Read 1900 times)

Danneaux

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Hi All!

Friday's UK Guardian (5 October 2012) has an interesting article on bike component theft, aimed primarily at the commuting market. The CTC's Chris Juden is cited and quoted, but it was the reader comments I found most interesting. The article appears online here:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/bike-blog/2012/oct/05/bike-theft-insurance-cover?INTCMP=SRCH

Certainly thought-provoking, though more about theneed to insure rather than practical tips. It is certainly too bad such thefts occur, but there is real wisdom in the idea of keeping a beater for commuting/parking purposes, with any spares (tool kit, pump, etc) carried in your take-away bag, briefcase, backpack, or purse. Unfortunately, commuting is the primary form of cycling for many of us, and a great way to get daily exercise; what a shame to do it on a beater. Still, might well be worth detaching the computer, pump, or whatever when leaving the bike alone for the day. But...what about the Brooks saddle? Pitlocks, Atomic-22, or similar! Even better...indoor, secure parking!

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2012, 02:54:58 AM by Danneaux »

Matt2matt2002

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2012, 11:17:47 AM »
A pal of mine did a long tour from UK to Pakistan and took a bike cover.
I was amazed but he maintained it was for security rather than keeping the bike dry.
He never had any problems.
Not sure what, if anything that proves but an interesting idea to ponder.
What would the various classes of thief make of a covered (and padlocked) bike.
Guess they would have to spend some of their valuable thieving time lifting the cover and this may put them off - to a degree.
All these 'security' questions involve the what if / what kinda thief factors, but i think it a worthwhile consideration.
Thoughts folks?
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

Danneaux

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2012, 04:56:46 PM »
Quote
Thoughts folks?
Hmm. Merit either way.

I have a picture in my head of a kid on Christmas morning, motoring through the wrapping paper to get at the gift inside. And, pocket knives are not uncommon.

On the other hand, the few bikes I've seen parked under covers were remarkably *un*remarkable with the covers removed, and seemed to be low-end bikes owned by fussbudgets who didn't want them to get wet while parked.

I can't imagine hauling the extra weight and bulk of a cover with me while touring...it is a single-use item really good for only its intended purpose. Still, its a matter of personal preference and your friend had no problems -- can't argue with success; it worked for him!

Maybe a cover would be more viable for a commuter bike parked in one place all day...

Best,

Dan. ("Cover me!" could have new meaning...)

Andybg

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2012, 05:57:16 PM »
It does make me shake my head. The solution advised to theft being an issue is get insurance.

I rarely leave my bike unattended for long and if I had to I would definetly use an old banger of a bike.

When I was at uni, I had my gazelle repainted one colour, took of all the markings and even the bar tape. It make it look a bit scruffy but kept it safe for the 5 years there.

It got stolen about 15 years later along with about 10 other bikes of mine when someone broke into my factory I used to have.

Most of the bikes were junk so it shows that sometimes thieves will take anything.

I do believe though that in a capatalist society theft should be taken far more seriously.

The police dont care about it.
The courts hardly punish people for it.

Line em up against a wall is my view on them.

Danneaux

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2012, 06:02:38 PM »
Quote
Line em up against a wall...
...and plug 'em, pardner. 'Worked for cattle rustlers, back in the day. Same here, agreed.

Best,

Dan. (...who lives where there is still a lot of open-rangeland, and rustlers are dealt with accordingly).

JWestland

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2012, 11:27:51 AM »
The painting trick works, so does the beater trick but that means you always drive to work on a shitty bike, which is a waste of fun as most of my cycle is commuting.

The Dutch way is: Lock back of bike, lock bike to stationary object also. This...kinda works as all bikes are rust buckets.

The only guarantee is Paid Parking (very common in NL, very rare in the UK) OR use two very expensive locks (NYForgetabboutit or another extreme D-lock) And hope the commercial thieves with the hydraulic locks aren't out.

That won't stop your wheel getting buckled in the bike parking or the drunks wrecking it, so don't bring your best carbon number to work  ;D

As for insurance, in UK I believe they only pay out an equivalent...so after a few years when your bike is stolen, you get second hand value and then have to hunt for the same/a similar bike. I don't think therefore it's much use for my Thorn, or my Charge. I mean they will get me 200 no doubt as the Thorn is 8-10 years old ;)

The Raleigh nobody wants anyway lol. Cycling has not arrived yet in Belfast, else my Thorn front wheel would have been "jocked" already  ;D
Pedal to the metal! Wind, rain, hills, braking power permitting ;)

richie thornger

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2012, 07:39:29 AM »
Slightly off topic but ever since I have fitted Home made brake bands To my bike I have started to leave my bike unlocked in those situations where you are in a shop but can still see it. Not in a city though i may add. Those little rubber bands are fantastic for on the train too.
As heavy as my locks are I will still be taking the 2kgs on my trip with me. Big u lock to
something solid and long thick cable that goes through the wheel and frame and hooked onto my pannier inside the tent when im sleeping. :)
I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal labotomy

JWestland

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2012, 10:32:39 AM »
Home made brake bands? I am intrigued :)
Pedal to the metal! Wind, rain, hills, braking power permitting ;)

richie thornger

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2012, 01:32:23 PM »
Brake bands as in click-stands so as not to confuse anyone. http://www.shop.click-stand.com/product.sc;jsessionid=C4A31160D5ED425CE19EA1581126BEBE.qscstrfrnt06?productId=8&categoryId=1
I bought the plastic toggles from ebay and used some elastic camping pole rope. The toggles should hold tight with the interlocking teeth but I chucked a good load of superglue in there too just to make sure.
They have so far performed flawlessly which is more than can be said for my home made click-stands.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal labotomy

richie thornger

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2012, 01:50:28 PM »
Getting back to the article. I live 25 miles North of central London. A massive difference in attitudes to so many things does this tiny distance make.
I have a lot of friends who live and work in London. The cyclists fall into two categories.
People who cycle to work and use it as their main form of transport or people who use the bike for pottering around on or fitness.
Nobody I know has a decent bike for commuting/transport, everyone else who does not leave their bike for very long has much nicer rides.
It is just a given that if you leave your bike for more than a few hours its going to be gone, or bits missing.
Brick Lane on a Sunday morning is where you go to buy your clunker and if you wait long enough it turns up there again!
My normal trick is to cycle into London and get the train home when I've had a few too many beers.
I would never leave my Thorn in town out of sight. The only times were both during the Olympics in the secure bike parks.
Luckily just 30 mins up the road where I live, people wouldn't know a Rohloff Hub from any other back wheel.
 
I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal labotomy

JWestland

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Re: _Guardian_ article on protecting your parked bike from parts theft
« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2012, 02:57:17 PM »
Sounds like the Dutch way, get crappy commuter and if it gets stolen, well you know where you can buy it back  :P

Here in Belfast it's not so bad, but only cos it's not really a bike city yet. Once your bike gets stolen from under your arse, cycling has arrived!

Do Not leave overnight at Central Station though and mountainbikes are more likely to get stolen. Confuse thieves with SPDs and weird tourers  ;D
Pedal to the metal! Wind, rain, hills, braking power permitting ;)