Author Topic: Danneaux's Nomad  (Read 83329 times)

martinf

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 563
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #525 on: July 02, 2016, 09:47:55 PM »
>I don't know what is wide for you Martin !
>Currently, i've Schwalbe Dureme in 2" and i think they are good on asphalt road.

I currently use 2" Supremes and 2" Duremes on my three 26" wheel bikes (2 Thorn Raven Tours and an old mountain bike).

In my opinion, Supremes are better than Duremes for road-only use, they have also survived careful use on tracks and paths, but I consider Duremes a better choice when tracks, paths and off-road riding make up a significant proportion of the riding mix.

Both Supremes and Duremes are lightweight tyres with flexible and relatively fragile casings/sidewalls, they roll easily compared to heavier tyres. I don't do real expedition touring, if I did I would choose a proper expedition tyre for reliability.

For off-road or expedition use I reckon 2.15 or 2.25 would be better than 2", but 2" is the widest tyre I can fit on any of my frames and still have reasonable mudguard clearance.

I also have a very old 650B wheel bike that I currently use on survey work. Until recently this had 42 mm tyres. The recently introduced "27.5" size is identical to 650B (Etrto 584 rims), so I took the opportunity of fitting 50 mm tyres which just fit my frame. This relatively small increase in width dramatically improved the capability of the bike on soft surfaces such as coastal sand.

As far as rim width is concerned, Andra 30 rims are designed for 25 to 57 mm tyres, whereas Andra 40 rims are designed for 37 to 62 mm. I have Andra 30 rims on my first Raven Tour, I think they are very good rims, but I believe Andra 40 would be even better for 2" tyres and larger.


Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7552
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #526 on: July 02, 2016, 10:41:32 PM »
Another Danneaux'mad update, lock edition this time 'round...

I was been pleased with my AXA Defender on Sherpa and moved it to the Nomad. Unfortunately, the Nomad's 19mm seatstays are really too large in diameter *and* spaced too far apart for any ready mounting solution to work with the AXA Defender, though I surely tried at some expense and effort. The AXA Defender now lives happily on one of my rando bikes made with standard diameter road bike tubing and 700x32C tires.

I looked at other ring-locks including the ABUS Amparo 4150 I have seen fitted to some Nomads, but I found it did not mount securely enough for me...the shackle is spring-loaded and caused it to "clock" around the chainstays when cocked or released. I think the Abus Amparo is a good lock, but its success depends in part on frame size and the seatstays on my Nomad are too wide apart where it would need to mount.

The solution for me came with Trelock's recent release of the RS 450 Protect-O-Connect Balloon edition ring lock, mounted on inverted Trelock ZR 20 Vario mounts. It fit my size 590M Nomad Mk2 to within 0.1mm -- spot-on, but only if I reversed the mounts top for bottom to pick up that wee bit of needed extra width.

The lock fits tightly and securely on the bike and has not moved or "clocked" around the stays at all in the last 6 months I've owned it. It clears the mudguards nicely and there is 14mm minimum clearance at the sidewalls of my fully inflated 2.0 Schwalbe Dureme tires. This will allow for much more mud clearance than the old AXA Defender. Wheel changes are a snap and mud clearance has not been a problem to date.

I again chose the key-retaining version so the key stays in the lock when it is unlocked. This means I won't forget it at home and the keyway is plugged against mud or dirt. I use a spiral wrap to hold the key to my wrist when off the bike. A little plastic clip also lets me snap it to a zipper pull or belt loop for extra security. It doesn't rattle in the lock while underway. I may shave the handle part of the key, as my baggy rain pants brush it lightly while pedaling.

Used alone, the ring-lock alone is not good security except for preventing snatch-grab or rideaway thefts -- the bike can still be carried away. For this reason, I also have three plug-in options:
a) Trelock's ZR 310 180cm x 10mm OD cable for securing the bike to a tree when I am riding in the backcountry, where I am unlikely to encounter people. This is the lightest but least secure option and allows me to secure the bike while using a primitive toilet or at a trailhead while I explore on foot. It stores on a Trelock mount atop my rear rack.
Weight: 430g/15.2oz

b) Trelock's ZR 355 Protect-O-Connect 150cm x 6.0mm diamater hardened chain with cover and storage bag. This is the one I am most likely to take touring, as it is a good compromise between lightweight, convenience, and security. It stores in my panniers inside a sturdy Cordura nylon bag. The bag also has velcro to attach it to a rear rack.
Weight: 1.63kg/57.4oz/3.58lb including carry bag.

c) Trelock's ZR 455 Protect-O-Connect 140cm x 8.5mm diameter hardened chain with cover and storage bag. I use it for securing the bike at home. it weighs a ton, but that doesn't matter as I rarely ride with it.
Weight: 3.0kg/106oz/6.62lb including carry bag.

Sorry, I did not weigh the lock and mounts before installation. Published weight for the lock alone is ~650g/23oz/1.4lb.

All three plug-ins use a 10mm plug that is secured when the ring-lock's hasp is thrown shut. Each is long enough to secure the front wheel *and* secure the bicycle to a fixed object even with loaded panniers. Each will also secure the anti-snatch cables on my Ortlieb panniers. The ring-lock's hasp secures a small-diameter cable run through the D-rings on my Ortlieb underseat bag and my saddle rails (thus also securing the Thudbuster LT suspension seatpost it sits on).

Why the ring-lock?
1) Where I live, snatch-grab thefts are a growing problem. I nearly lost the Nomad when I stopped at a bench to remove my 3/4 tights. With the ring-lock, I can quickly disable the rear wheel from rolling, making the bike unridable. This is also helpful when the bike must be left in the larger interior of a public restroom while I am using a stall.

2) Ring-locks with plug-ins effectively give me two locks for the price of one. If the plug-in is cut, I still have the wheel secured. If the wheel hasp is cut, the plug-in remains attached and secure.

3) The ring-lock secures the rear wheel nicely. It is really difficult for bolt cutter jaws to reach into the limited space where the hasp resides under the rim.

4) The ring-lock hasp provides a point to secure another cable or small chain,so I effectively have three locks for one key, not just two.

5) If I have to carry a lock anyway, the ring-lock and a plug-in are lighter than a heavy U-lock and cable or chain and the plug-ins allow me to tailor my options to the tour.

6) It is sometimes difficult to use a U-lock to properly secure a loaded touring bike. My panniers block most of my seatstays and make it difficult to use the "Sheldon Brown locking method" to secure the rear wheel to a post. I can thread the lock through a chainstay, but then it is oriented wrong. This means I still must depend on a cable or chain to secure the bike to a post, and sometimes it can be challenge to also capture the front wheel and my pannier anti-theft tethers.

I don't think a ring-lock even with a heavy-duty plug-in chain is as secure as a properly employed U-lock whose open space is filled in part by the detached front wheel. However, I think this is a better solution for me in general touring use where I need to accommodate and at least partially secure a full touring load when traveling solo.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2016, 01:16:16 AM by Danneaux »

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7552
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #527 on: July 02, 2016, 10:43:29 PM »
More pics of the Trelock RS 450 Balloon ring-lock mounted on my 590M Nomad Mk2...

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2016, 01:38:42 AM by Danneaux »

julio

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 257
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #528 on: July 03, 2016, 02:33:59 PM »
Thanks Martin for yours advises ! you're not the only one to advise me for a pair of Andra 40.

As well, i'm currently in a region of France, where there is a artisan travel bike manufacturer, he use this model of rims for his customers, and i think he told me by phone than he have some of this rims in stock..

Why did you say, "its difficult to find them" ?

Dan,

Can you tell me in which situation do you use this lock ?

i remember they're heavy locks .. and not really effective for someone who really wants your bike  :D 


martinf

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 563
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #529 on: July 03, 2016, 03:48:02 PM »
Thanks Martin for yours advises ! you're not the only one to advise me for a pair of Andra 40.

As well, i'm currently in a region of France, where there is a artisan travel bike manufacturer, he use this model of rims for his customers, and i think he told me by phone than he have some of this rims in stock..

Why did you say, "its difficult to find them" ?

Last time I wanted to buy rims they were not available anywhere locally (I live in South Brittany). An Internet search found only one online dealer in Austria who had Andra 40 rims, but they weren't in the 36 hole version I wanted.

I ended up getting some Sun Ringle Rhyno Lite rims at a good price, these are substantially lighter than Andra 30 and 40, so they probably won't be so durable, but should suffice for my planned use on utility bikes. At 27.4 mm outside dimensions they fall between the Andra 30 and 40 in width.

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7552
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #530 on: July 03, 2016, 06:23:28 PM »
Quote
Can you tell me in which situation do you use this lock ?

Hi Julien,

As it happens, I use the frame mounted ring-lock daily -- whenever I stop the bike and leave it even at arm's length while taking photographs, changing outer clothing, eating a snack or using the toilet. Theft is such a problem where I live, being able to lock the rear wheel is a great aid in discouraging someone grabbing the bike and riding away.

I use the plug-in cable to secure the bike to trees when I am camping in the forest, or while I am hiking at remote trailheads or when I am using a primitive forest toilet and could not prevent a theft. A friend lost his bike a week ago in just this situation. While he was using the forest toilet, a couple of guys drove up, threw his bike in their pickup truck and drove away. I got his call and drove him home.

I use the (lighter) chain while touring with a load because it allows me to secure both wheels and the frame and then secure the frame to a fixed object. It is difficult with loaded panniers to properly use a U-lock to provide maximum security as I would when riding the bike unladen. U-locks also do not go 'round things like trees very well.

I use the (heavy) chain at home to secure the bike in my storage.
Quote
i remember they're heavy locks...
They are heavy, though not as heavy as some really secure U-locks like the ABUS Granite when also combined with a chain.

I can't even begin to tell you how much it irritates me to have to carry a heavy lock to keep what is rightfully mine. Grrr.
Quote
...and not really effective for someone who really wants your bike
Agreed, though nothing is wholly effective when a thief is really determined. Where I live, thieves ride openly with bolt cutters and at least one bike they have liberated. The police no longer investigate property crimes or will even take a report for insurance -- you have to download a form if you need it. The jails are full and all but murder suspects are released after no more than several hours in custody. Nothing is proof against the portable angle grinder equipped with cutoff wheels. If the thief cannot cut through the lock with one, they will cut the frame in two and take the pieces with them so they can remove the parts and components at leisure to resell on eBay or Craigslist. On my riverside walk yesterday, I passed no fewer than 7 cut-in-two bike frames, all stripped of parts.

My goal with the ring lock and plug-ins is to keep the bike when it is most vulnerable in usage -- when I am more than arm's length from it for more than a moment, when I am touring in more remote areas, and when I am away from it briefly shopping in rural markets for groceries.  Beyond that, there is not too much the *solo* touring cyclist can do, though I could always supplement the ring-lock with one of my U-locks if needed...the U-lock typically weighs less than the heavy chain and even a bit less than my medium one...but then how best to secure both wheels and the frame with a full touring load? Touring with a partner is one of the greatest aids to security and theft prevention, but not always possible or desirable.

For now, the ring lock is proving both a great convenience and good security...partly because it is always ready and so easily activated and used so I really can't forget.

All the best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2016, 06:25:29 PM by Danneaux »

StuntPilot

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 423
    • Tour on a Bike
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #531 on: July 04, 2016, 12:00:44 PM »
Dan

I am shocked that people can walk around openly with angle grinders and not get stopped!  :o They would not last long on the streets here.

Interesting chat about the frame/ring lock you have found. I have the AXA Defender on my Raven Tour and love it. At the back of mind I have wondered about mud and clearance when using 2 inch tyres. I too use the ring lock at every opportunity.

I use Schwalbe Marathon Plus 1.75 tyres at the moment and the clearance is fine with the AXA Defender ring lock. Should I do a more off-road tour, then I would have to consider a ring lock with a wider opening like the one you now use. I use either the cable or chain depending on the tour. I only use the Abus Granite X-Plus 54 in cities. Too heavy on tour I agree.

http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/accessories/locks/product/review-abus-abus-granit-x-plus-54-300-39850/

Can you tell me the size of the opening in mm with your new ring rock Dan?

The AXA Defender has a 51mm opening and is rated security level 12. AXA have recently introduced a stronger ring lock called the Solid Plus which looks interesting too. It has a 58mm opening and a security level of 15 ...

http://www.axasecurity.com/bike-security/en-gb/products/locks/framelocks/axa-set-solid-plus-plus-pi150-removable/

Another anti-theft idea would be removable pedals. MKS of Japan have a great quality removable pedal, the MKS EZY Superior. It would be even better if it was flat one side and SPD the other ...

http://www.cyclocamping.com/Pedals__Clips__Straps/mks_ezy_superior_exim_pedals/EZYEXIM-149.aspx

Not cheap though.

Matt2matt2002

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1358
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #532 on: July 04, 2016, 01:28:26 PM »
Re Axa locks, I sold mine on when I fitted 2" Marathons to my Raven.
Miss it to bits so will take a look at the one Dan mentioned.

Mnd you, I took Dan's advice re the curly wrist attachment for the key and still managed to loose it in a supermarket!
Fortunately handed in to security.
I think it was a cheap nylon spring type.
Maty
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7552
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #533 on: July 04, 2016, 03:54:55 PM »
Quote
Can you tell me the size of the opening in mm with your new ring rock Dan?
I'm at the Coast till Wednesday morning, then will return to ship a frame/fork I just sold on eBay and will measure the lock and report the particulars then. As I recall, the opening in the Balloon model is around 72mm, but I will need to measure to confirm.

Please note I still love my AXA Defender and it now lives on one of my rando bikes. The gravel grinder/dirt rando will get a new AXA Victory. It is essentially a Defender with a restyled case, new colors and one real advance: The inner steel case is fully perimeter seam-welded. All Defender plug-in and mounts work with the Victory. The Victory also introduces a new, much easier mounting system that uses two worm-drive screw clamps per bracket. Mine will arrive soon.

Please note: I moved to the Trelock RS 450 Balloon on the Nomad because...
a) it was the only frame mounted ring lock that would clamp onto my size 590M's widely spaced 19mm stays as securely as I require (though in my particular application I had to invert the mounts to do it).
...and...
b) the Balloon model has a *much* wider opening for better mud clearance both vertically and at the critical point opposite the tire sidewalls. This allows the clearance you see in the photo above. As I recall, the AXA Defender had something like 4mm clearance, so the Trelock Baloon added 1cm per side. Again, this is from memory, so I will get exact measurements in a couple days.
Quote
Mind you, I took Dan's advice re the curly wrist attachment for the key and still managed to loose it in a supermarket!
Matt, as with many (but not all) ringlocks, the Trelock RS450 Balloon is available in versions that retain the key (NAZ) or allow removal (AZ). The ART security ratings are based on the lock design, but insurance compensation in the Netherlands is based on the key-retaining versions: If the lock is open, the key is in it and will go with a stolen bike. If the owner has the key, it is proof the bike was locked and thetefore eligible for compensation. It is expected there will be two keys with each lock. If the maker's key service is used to make n more, this is noted and cross referenced before compensation is paid. I always order a spare key to leave at home and take 1 on tour "because". Of course, one rides in my key-retaining lock (3 total).

Matt, I have added a small plastic clip to the key's ring that holds the spiral wrist holder. This allows the option to clip the key to a zipper pull or to a length of Spectra Cord 'round my neck while away from the bike.

Quote
I am shocked that people can walk around openly with angle grinders and not get stopped!  :o They would not last long on the streets here.
well...they walk around openly carrying bolt cutters and burglary tools, too. It really is something. The System here in my community is so badly broken, I have no words to describe it. Sadly, I don't see it getting better anytime soon. It is particularly sad because this social flaw is a stark, ugly contrast to Oregon's stunning natural beauty.

Best,

Dan.

julio

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 257
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #534 on: July 04, 2016, 06:20:13 PM »
Another Danneaux'mad update, lock edition this time 'round...


Why the ring-lock?
1) Where I live, snatch-grab thefts are a growing problem. I nearly lost the Nomad when I stopped at a bench to remove my 3/4 tights. With the ring-lock, I can quickly disable the rear wheel from rolling, making the bike unridable. This is also helpful when the bike must be left in the larger interior of a public restroom while I am using a stall.


Best,

Dan.

 :o


I'm planning to combine this lock, if i have to pass a night outside
https://www.bike-components.de/fr/Trelock/Schlaufenkabel-ZS-180-p33727/

With this sort of lock
https://www.bike-components.de/fr/ABUS/Faltschloss-Bordo-Granit-X-Plus-6400-Auslaufmodell-p21097/

But at day time, it's best to keep the bike near of you or find a solution where people are around (like that the potential thief don't know if the owner keep an eye on it)
« Last Edit: July 04, 2016, 06:53:37 PM by julio »

IanW

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 89
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #535 on: July 04, 2016, 07:49:47 PM »
I have used a number of different makes / models of ring lock over the years.
(AXA RL, Abus Amparo 4580, AXA Victory)

I marginally favour the AXA products compared to the Abus products of equivalent vintage
because Abus products seem to be a bit more show-above-substance
where AXA have been a bit more substantial.

I too prefer the key-retaining versions and use the captive key to also carry the other lock(s) keys.

And I have used a variety mounting methods including:
a) The plastic block + "J"-shaped hook bolt
b) nylon zip-ties
C) plastic-coated garden tying wire with insulatating tape over-wrap.
They all work adequately to a greater or lesser extent.
They are certainly easier to fit if you do not have the constraint of a seat-stay-bridge brake caliper nut or bolt to contend with.
But cantilever / V-brake bosses can be a hinderance too, but then there is this type of mount that can help
http://www.dutchbikebits.com/wheel-lock-v-brake-mounting-kit

This mount from AXA also provides considerable mounting flexibility
http://practicalcycles.com/products/334993--axa-flex-mount-flexible-fitting-bradckets-for-frame-lock-defendervictory.aspx

Regarding the "plug-in" additional chains / cables: I have mixed feelings about these
because they rely on the security of the ring-lock (i.e. single point of failure)
but they then typically then provide an extra point of attack (i.e. leverage) on this lock.
And the chains and cables with the proprietary plug are not that strong (e.g. only 6mm chain link diameter).

So I simply use a slightly heavier grade chain (8mm link diameter) with a large "eye" link on one end and then insert the regular-sized link on the other end of this into the ring-lock sliding locking bar.

At work I used to use a 12mm link diameter chain locked in with the ring-lock to the rear wheel AND to a U-lock to frame and front wheel.

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7552
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #536 on: July 04, 2016, 08:10:51 PM »
Hi Julien!

I agree, it is useful to employ at least two different means to secure a bike so the thief is required to bring two different tools to defeat them.

I used a Kryptonite Evo U-lock and 10mm cable to secure my Miyata on my 2008 tour of NL and BE and to secure AndyBG's Raven Tour on my 2014 European double-crossing.

However, I would be leery of depending on my 10mm cable here at home unless I used it in more remote areas. Cables are just too easy to cut with anything from clippers to utility scissors.

The link locks are a good idea, but the riveted joints are vulnerable to counter-pries and to joint-edge cuts by bolt cutters, which also snip through cables. In my sad little petri dish of bike theft, I come across at least one link-lock each week lying broken and discarded along the riverbank paths. Here is why:
https://youtu.be/opjDdMkpjXQ

In the end, any lock can be defeated and any lock is better than no lock, and if you have a lock, it really needs to be carried and used to be effective. If you travel with a companion, one can swap off on bike-watching duties. If you are solo, you can co-opt others to the task either casually or by creating a bailment-for-hire.

For example,  in Germany, I wanted to get a haircut inside a shopping mall. Outside, a group of pensioners were people watching and we became engaged through my answers to their questions about bicycle travel. They offered to watch my (locked) bike while I was gone. One came to tell me when they later had to leave. Ideal.

Other times, I found that nearby hotels would agree to watch the bike, placing it in secure storage for a small fee and a claim tag. In between these two options, I sometimes bought a beer for petrol station staff to stand casual watchor keep the bike in their office. In Turnu Magurele, a toilet attendant gladly volunteered to watch the locked bike while I was inside...good for a generous tip from me!

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2016, 11:04:42 PM by Danneaux »

JimK

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1583
    • Interdependent Science
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #537 on: July 04, 2016, 10:43:38 PM »
I'm using the Abus Bordo 6500 lock these days... a step up from the 6000. Hard to say with any of these. I am in a more urban area these days so bike theft is a real issue. I don't often leave the bike out of sight for very long... it's always a gamble!

julio

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 257
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #538 on: July 05, 2016, 01:43:13 PM »
I'm using the Abus Bordo 6500 lock these days... a step up from the 6000. Hard to say with any of these. I am in a more urban area these days so bike theft is a real issue. I don't often leave the bike out of sight for very long... it's always a gamble!


A bit like an adrenaline "surge" when you return to your bike   ???

JimK

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1583
    • Interdependent Science
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #539 on: July 05, 2016, 10:22:31 PM »
  an adrenaline "surge" when you return to your bike

got to say, I do experience a minor panic as I round the corner and, whew, it's still there!