Author Topic: Danneaux's Nomad  (Read 74656 times)

martinf

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #510 on: December 04, 2015, 10:41:17 PM »
I've got one of those big BBB bottle holders on each of my two Thorn Ravens. Not possible to fit two on the mounts inside the frame without interference  between the bottles, so the 2nd bottle holder is normal size. For the moment I don't use the 3rd set of mounts under the frame as bottles tend to get mucky in this position in local weather conditions, and I rarely need more than 2,5 litres of water.

The clip for the neck of the bottle is more secure if a strong O-ring of the right size is fitted over the hooks.

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #511 on: May 13, 2016, 07:48:20 PM »
Probably stupidly given my continuing battle with a heavy cold, I rode the Nomad into Oregon's Coast Range yesterday to the site of a salvage logging operation, where burned trees are collected for processing so they don't go to waste.

This has been a favorite destination for the last 37 years, usually alone but sometimes with my late father, who traversed these roads with me on a half-dozen loaded tours. The roads are steep -- my Austrian-made SkyMounti inclinometer's bubble was packed up at the top end of the scale, which only reads slopes to 20%. Grateful once again for the 36x17 gearing that results in a 15 gear-inch low.

I went light this time -- 6.5l of water and my rack-pack with a wind jacket and some food. The Thudbuster LT seatpost proved its worth for me once again when riding the Nomad largely unladen.

Heat reflected off the roadside rock walls, boosting the temperature to 33.9C, which dropped to 27.7C in the open. Hated to carry so much water, but the photos show the classic problem: I ride up high, while water is usually at the bottom of inaccessible valleys far below.

Soon's I can dump the head and chest cold, this will be a great destination to test the Carradice Minimalist setup on my way through to the Coast and then back again (double transits get bonus climbing points!).

Best,

Dan.

[A little hiccup in the connection meant I had to repost; sorry if it meant a double notification]

David Simpson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #512 on: May 13, 2016, 09:35:14 PM »
Dan --

When you do your trips on these logging roads, do you do a loop, or do you need to return on the same road? We have the same types of roads in my area (western Canada), and many of the roads are dead-end -- they go up the mountain to the logging areas, but do not necessary connect to any other roads. Some of the main roads do go through, but the trick is to know which is the main road when you come to a fork. I used to have a Jeep, and did quite a bit of back country exploring on these roads. My friend had a theory that at a fork, the dead-end "spur line" road would look twice as travelled, since people would need to return on that road. The main road would be the one that looked less travelled.

Just curious.

Nice photos, by the way. It's nice that the good weather has finally arrived.

- DaveS

mickeg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1312
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #513 on: May 13, 2016, 10:30:58 PM »
If you use a Thudbuster and a Carradice saddle bag supported by a rack, your Thudbuster would result in your saddle loops that hold the bag straps moving up and down relative to your rack. 

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #514 on: May 13, 2016, 11:55:42 PM »
Quote
When you do your trips on these logging roads, do you do a loop, or do you need to return on the same road? We have the same types of roads in my area (western Canada), and many of the roads are dead-end -- they go up the mountain to the logging areas, but do not necessary connect to any other roads. Some of the main roads do go through, but the trick is to know which is the main road when you come to a fork.
<nods> It is the same here, Dave. I spent a good part of all my summer childhood vacations in the BC/Vancouver Island area, and the two places look remarkably similar.

I think your friend had a good idea, but it seems to work the opposite here: The logging spurs tend to be temporary and dead-end, meaning the heavier use goes on the main access roads which connect to others in the road system or loop themselves. Below is a photo taken of the road system board posted for the area by the BLM. It is a rough guide and you'll note North is at the bottom, which causes all sorts of problems for people who don't notice or are unfamiliar with the area. It is correct for the way the map-board is oriented geographically, but all confusion would have been prevented if it had been oriented with North at the top *and* located on the North side of the road.

It can be a real trick keeping things straight between BLM (Bureau of Land Management), FS (Forest Service) and private logging-access roads...and all have their own numbering systems that may or may not be updated annually. I keep a good stock or both paper and electronic maps and use my GPS' tracking function and waypoints to make sure I can return the way I came -- assuming the satellites are not blocked by southern ridges or slot canyons. There is no cell service even on the ridge-tops and it would the Real Easy to get Lost without much effort. Even without getting lost, it can be No Fun making endless backtracks in steep terrain.

Quote
If you use a Thudbuster and a Carradice saddle bag supported by a rack, your Thudbuster would result in your saddle loops that hold the bag straps moving up and down relative to your rack.
A keen observation, mickeg, and one I am keeping in mind. If it has enough layback to clear the saddle at full travel, Thorn's 45 Saddlebag Bracket might be just the answer:
With shim: http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/thorn-saddlebag-bracket-1725-mm-extension-222mm-45-deg-prod22924/?geoc=us
Without: http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/thorn-accessory-bar-t-shaped-1725-mm-extension-45-deg-no-shim-prod28574/?geoc=us

If I relocate my motion-detecting alarm to the saddlebag bracket, there would be plenty of room below the TBLT pivot on the seatpost to clamp one of these. If I used cut-down Arno straps  http://www.amazon.com/CoghlanS-Arno-Strap-Blister-Pack/dp/B002YLK5IA ) or toe straps to secure the bag to the Thorn Saddlebag Bracket, it would be secured or released almost instantly, as the straps would only need to be loosened, not unthreaded. Without holes, the straps are infinitely adjustable and could be snugged up to remove all play. The bottom of the bag would still be supported by the rear rack, and the suspension function would be independent of the bag mount. One of many options I am considering.

All the best,

Dan.

mickeg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1312
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #515 on: May 14, 2016, 12:20:06 AM »
This past Thursday I was part of a group ride, one person had a Burley tandem.  The stem for the stoker plus a piece of cut down handlebar (or wood broom handle) would work exactly like the Thorn Tee Bar too.  So, if you are looking for other lengths or angles that Thorn does not make, there may be more options used by tandems for stoker stems.



Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #516 on: May 14, 2016, 12:30:55 AM »
Yep! I may end up fabricating a simple stub seatpost mount modeled after the adjustable stoker stem I TiG'd and brazed together for the tandem (photo below). Each bike's seatpost would get a stub base and I could simply transfer my own T-bar into it as I moved the bag from bike to bike. This would allow me to still use a conventional underseat bag when I didn't want or need to carry the Carradice Camper Longflap. The bag wouldn't require a quick-release as the mount itself would assume that function. If I make the mount in a "K" shape, it will keep the bag upright and obviate any need for a rack or bagman to support it

More about the photo...I spliced both tandem computers to run off a single (front wheel) pickup, so the readings are identical. Notice the captain's "rocker" type suspension seatpost. It takes the edge off smaller bumps already damped by sitting in the middle of a very long wheelbase. The rear telescopic sus-post was constructed half by me from a ready-made shaft rescued from a trash skip. I milled a new plunger and made a seat cradle, then created the combination spring/elastomer internal suspension elements and preload adjustment.

Still thinking about how best to mount the 'dice saddlebag to multiple bikes...

All the best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2016, 12:33:56 AM by Danneaux »

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #517 on: June 04, 2016, 05:11:26 PM »
Hi All!

While on a recent build-fest, I gave some thought on how to best mount my Ortlieb Medium Underseat Bag to the Brooks saddle on my Nomad. Ortlieb's mounting brackets don't usually work with Brooks saddles, but once in awhile there is a lucky combination of saddle setback that allows it, as happened for me with Sherpa and the Nomad whilst using long-layback rigid seatposts.

However, my luck ran out when I fitted a Thudbuster LT suspension seatpost to the Nomad...there just wasn't enough space left on the Brooks rails before they flared too wide to attach the Ortlieb bag mount.

I need the bag to fit close to the saddle to maximize vertical rack space, yet the bag must attach and detach easily and remain secure. Ortlieb offers an alternative two-piece strap mounting setup but it looks bad, allows the bag to wiggle about, and requires a third point of attachment to the seatpost, not possible with a Thudbuster...especially if the neoprene dust cover is used.

Wire-rope clamps and billet aluminum to the rescue! Rather than simply sandwiching the rails between two strips of aluminum stock, I decided to go with wire clamps for maximum security. The bag is held completely rigid to the rails on the very rough terrain I often travel with the Nomad. I seldom leave any opportunity for chance loss, so I have also secured the bag to the rails with a webbing strap and quick-release buckle. I was annoyed to find the Ortlieb mount uses Phillips-head machine screws, so I replaced them with 5mm allen bolts. The A2 (302) stainless shown are for fitup and will be replaced by A4 (316).

Now the photographs are done, the lot will be painted black to match the bike and vinyl thread caps will cover the exposed nuts; exposed bolt ends will be removed so I can use the space above the rails to store my saddle rain cover. Except for the aluminum bracket and plastic Ortieb mount, all hardware is marine grade stainless steel. Nylock nuts and Medium (blue) Loctite 242 will secure the lot. The Ortlieb bag and mount are unmodified so they can be used on another bike in the future if desired. The loaded bag has no discernible effect on the Thudbuster's suspension function.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 09:24:13 PM by Danneaux »

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #518 on: June 04, 2016, 07:41:21 PM »
For those of you who have PM'D me to ask why I prefer the Ortlieb Medium underseat bag...
It is truly waterproof so my tools won't rust.
Surprisingly lightweight yet robust for its weight.
Can be cabled to the saddle and bike for a measure of security while parked. I always carry a short length of small diameter cable to deter saddle/seatpost theft while the bike is parked and locked.
The mount is secure yet releases quickly.
It doesn't interfere with my legs while pedaling.
The roll top means it can compress the contents so they ride silently, without rattles.
It includes strap guides for redundant mounting on rough roads to prevent loss.
It is sized so all my most frequently needed tools and spares are ready to hand so I don't have to dig through my panniers when I just want to make a quick repair and be back in service soonest.  These include:
    Spare tube
    Vulcanizing and instant tube patch kits
    Spare quick-links for the chain
    Multi-tool incl. tire levers and chain tool.
    Spare mini-pump
    Nitrile gloves to prevent dirty hands that would transfer rim oxides, chain oil and grease to clothing, tent, mat and sleeping bag.
    Thorn combo BB eccentric bolt wrench/pin spanner/pedal wrench.
    Tire boot
    Cable ties
    Common spare bolts incl. Seatpost clamp bolt and SPD cleat bolts
    1m length of duct tape

So equipped, I rarely have need to access the other tools I carry, so I can leave them stored until it is convenient to make less common repairs in camp. This means I don't have to carry so many tools in my panniers, so space is freed for carrying other items.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 10:16:59 PM by Danneaux »

julio

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 203
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #519 on: June 30, 2016, 10:12:52 PM »
Hi All!

I'm installing my spare spokes in the Nomad's seatpost using the same plug I made for Sherpa (see: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=3896.msg18563#msg18563 ).

Some of you have wondered what size spokes are used on my 2012 Nomad Mk2. The actual lengths of my six Thorn-supplied spare Sapim spokes and Sapim Polyax nipples are:

(3) @ 238mm, butted 1.8/2.0mm, laced cross-2 for the Rohloff hub
(3) @ 260mm, butted 1.8/2.0mm, laced cross-3 for the SON28 (New-style) dynohub

...paired with 26" Rigida Andra 32-hole rims.

Best,

Dan.

Hi Dan,

Assuming i buy a pair of Andra 30..(and a Son 28 front hub)

Can i use the same length of spokes as you  ? (front and rear)


Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #520 on: July 01, 2016, 02:06:57 AM »
Quote
Assuming i buy a pair of Andra 30..(and a Son 28 front hub)

Can i use the same length of spokes as you  ? (front and rear)
Hi Julien!

You should be fine. I measured the spokes that came as extras with my Nomad and I used both DT Swiss and Park spoke rulers, so the numbers should be accurate.

One thing of note: The SON 28 I use on my Nomad is the SON28 New, now commonly referred to as the "SON28".

According to Peter White ( http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/schmidt.php ), this current SON 28 New (with ball-shaped hub center) has a flange diameter of 54mm.

The SON28 Klassik (older model with barrel-shaped hub center, still available) has a flange diameter of 70mm.

Best,

Dan.

martinf

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #521 on: July 01, 2016, 06:15:17 AM »

Assuming i buy a pair of Andra 30..(and a Son 28 front hub)


If you plan on using wide tyres and doing expedition riding, the wider Andra 40 rims might be even better than Andra 30, and only slightly heavier.

But they are difficult to find.

julio

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 203
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #522 on: July 02, 2016, 11:27:44 AM »
I don't know what is wide for you Martin !

Currently, i've Schwalbe Dureme in 2" and i think they are good on asphalt road.

If i'm planning to go in Africa on dirt roads for example, "Marathon Mondial" tires will be a good choice i think but..

Should i stay in 2" or 2.15  ? or more wide ? ( i didn"t find a biggest size than 2.15 for the Marathon Mondial tires)

Dan, Thanks for your advises   

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #523 on: July 02, 2016, 05:41:39 PM »
Quote
Currently, i've Schwalbe Dureme in 2" and i think they are good on asphalt road.
<nods> I have found them to be a very good all-'round tire for pavement and use on mixed surfaces.

Where I have found them to be problematic is while riding on the very rough, sharp-edged ballast rock used on logging roads in my area. They are irregular in shape, ungraded, and tend to collapse around the tire. The Dureme's sidewalls are a bit fragile for this sort of thing. Not a real failing given the overall mission of the tires. i like them enormously and have found them to be an ideal compromise. However, I do make sure I ride with care on that particular surface. "Regular" gravel and bad roads have not been a problem for me.

I had really good luck with the 2.0 Marathon deluxe tires fitted to the Raven Tour kindly loaned me by Forum member AndyBG for my 2014 tour. Their sidewalls seemed a bit more robust than the Duremes', but they rolled well under load. I only had one flat in ~9,000km; it was caused by a long roofing stable I picked up outside Giurgiu, Romania. Not a bad thing, it caused a chance meeting with the homeowner whose lawn-edge I was using to make repairs. We became friends immediately and I have stayed in online contact with his lovely daughter.  :)

Quote
If i'm planning to go in Africa on dirt roads for example, "Marathon Mondial" tires will be a good choice i think but..

Should i stay in 2" or 2.15  ? or more wide ? ( i didn"t find a biggest size than 2.15 for the Marathon Mondial tires)
The Marathon Mondial is sort of the definitive expedition tire, and for good reason. It is very durable, but it is also heavy and this can be noticeable when riding unladen...not so much when loaded to the gunwales.

If you go too wide on your tires, you may have problems with mudguard/fender clearance when traversing actual mud -- it can cake onto the tires and cause rubbing that will slow or stop your progress, as it did me in Romania and again in rural Belgium and Germany. It was not so fun getting off the bike and into mud well over my shoe-tops to remove enough mud for the wheels to turn...only to repeat the operation 100m later. Pushing the bike doesn't really help that much. My hat is off to Shimano for making pedals and cleats that reliably dis/engage in such conditions. If you find yourself in such conditions, use a stick instead of fingers to clear the mess, 'cos the edge of the mudguards is sharp against wet fingers.

Remember also, tire profiles are roughly 1:1, so a wider tire is also a taller tire. If you fit fatter tires, you will likely need to raise your mudguards by removing some spacers. The tightest point for mud clearance will generally be under the mounting bolt heads, inside the mudguards.

So, the takeaway here is if you fit larger tires, make sure you have adequate mudguard clearance for use in really poor conditions.

A general caution: Though the Nomad is capable of carrying enormous loads reliably and well, cycling is always more pleasurable with "less". I speak as someone who introduced a visiting Dutch friend to cycle-camping. He had not really camped and wanted to carry all the amenities with him (we had a folding kitchen sink, so yes we took that as well...and his Dutch Army tank driver's boots for hiking, and...). Well, why not? The fully provisioned bike with us aboard and the trailer in tow weighed in at 272kg/600lb. My homemade trailer weighed 57kg/125lb alone. We did fine riding even on steep grades on gravel Forest Service roads using 26x1.5in road slicks. It would have been more pleasurable grinding uphill if we had also fitted a winch...or carried less.

I rarely load my Nomad with cargo weighing above 25kg for "normal" tours, but when desert touring for extended periods, then I add the 26.5kg of water and extra food, because there is little fresh water available and no stores for resupply. It is not practical to pre-cache supplies thanks to the heat and animal predation. For the occasions when I have taken a full load, the Duremes proved both wide enough and strong enough for my needs.

Even so, the desert heat demands I carry more stuff...a folding, vented Korean fisherman's hat for shade when stopped, and a folding chair to get me off the scalding hot pavement at lunch breaks. Pulling off hot tar that has solidified on the skin is no fun...the skin comes off with it. Lycra shorts melt, too. You have to carry what you need for the demands of a given tour.

Of course, terrain, riding style, user preference, and a hundred other variables come into play, but the general maxim still holds -- carry less to enjoy more.

I remember riding on my last long tour and realizing that at any given moment, I was *not* using ~95% of my carried items. The trouble is, the ~5% I did use varied, sometimes within the hour as weather changed.

All the best,

Dan.

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7283
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Danneaux's Nomad
« Reply #524 on: July 02, 2016, 08:30:16 PM »
Just in from riding logging roads. The bike got its usual post-rode cleanup and looks spiffy once again. No hub leaks, oil misting, or anything untoward visible between my wipe-downs. The Purple Extreme oil does reduce "dusting" of the chain and keeps things considerably cleaner than "wet" oils.

The bracket I made for the Ortlieb Medium Underseat Bag works with my rack-pack to leave more room in the big bag. Before, they were mutually exclusive. The bracket is now acid-etched and painted satin black to match the saddle rails.
Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2016, 12:01:51 AM by Danneaux »