Author Topic: Do you really need a buffer battery?  (Read 5613 times)

JimK

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2013, 04:22:17 AM »
I wish you luck.

These days my work is writing software to control grid connected batteries that can supply maybe 250 KW for 15 minutes or that scale of thing anyway. Not so very hard to trash a couple hundred thousand dollars of batteries, it turns out. I will need that luck!

il padrone

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2013, 10:41:50 AM »
Oh crikey!! I thought you had said you didn't understand the complexities of batteries and electricity  :o :-X

JimK

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2013, 03:19:15 PM »
you had said you didn't understand the complexities of batteries

Nothing quite like cracking my head up against reality to discover how little I understand!

Andre Jute

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2013, 07:14:44 PM »
Oh crikey!! I thought you had said you didn't understand the complexities of batteries and electricity  :o :-X

Yeah, and here I was teaching my grandmother to suck eggs!

rifraf

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2013, 04:38:34 PM »
OK, my battery has arrived and the good news for me is that unlike some who left their feedback on the Amazon site, mine is not DOA but working well in that I've charged it up and utilised it to charge both my phone a few times as well as my Petzl Tikka XP2 head lamp with usb rechargeable battery.

Today I got the call from the bike shop that my wheel had been built up from the parts I'd dropped off.
These were a Son28 center-lock disk hub, Velocity Dyad rim and 36 Sapim  spokes.
I'm a little less than happy with the build due to him taking it upon himself to not cross the spokes so that they touch.
Hmmmmm they cross but dont touch like my front wheel on my Ogre which is built up of identical parts (albeit 6 bolt disk Son28).
I'm not sure how to articulate better I'm afraid as I'm a rider (on occasion) and not a bike mechanic.
I'm worried the wheel wont be as strong as a more traditional build.

Wow, doesnt the dust show up well on my printer :o
« Last Edit: December 05, 2013, 04:43:07 PM by rifraf »

JimK

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2013, 05:04:17 PM »
yeah it is pretty wild, all these patterns for lacing up a wheel. Cross-3, Cross-4, Cross-2, and I don't know what all. Looks like a nice wheel though, for sure! I know Rohloff is pretty fussy about how they want wheel laced. Not sure about SON. My guess is that your wheel will work just fine.

rifraf

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2013, 05:33:48 PM »
yeah it is pretty wild, all these patterns for lacing up a wheel. Cross-3, Cross-4, Cross-2, and I don't know what all. Looks like a nice wheel though, for sure! I know Rohloff is pretty fussy about how they want wheel laced. Not sure about SON. My guess is that your wheel will work just fine.
Its been made a three cross as requested, no issue there.
It more that the spokes on my other same spec wheel, touch, where they over-lap each other, close to the hub and on both sides of the wheel.

Danneaux

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2013, 06:51:07 PM »
Hi Rif'!

Fine-looking setup there in all, and so glad the battery is working as advertised -- Yay! Such a disappointment when things occasionally are DOA on opening the package (sometimes happens to me and it feels like Santa has suddenly gone on-strike).

A bit hard to tell from the photo, but it appears the builder did not "weave" the spokes at their last crossing. If it were one of my wheels, I would redo it. Have you mentioned this to him? It's possible he got distracted during lacing on a busy day and never noticed it. It can be redone, but it would depend on how willing he is to do so, as it means rebuilding the wheel except for the initial step of lacing from the hub.

Best,

Dan.

mickeg

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2013, 12:18:00 AM »
I sort of agree with Dan, but it looked like a few of the spokes were laced differently from some of the  others.  Can't tell for sure from the photo.  Can you provide a photo with more pixels similar to the first photo?

rifraf

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2014, 12:55:20 PM »
I sort of agree with Dan, but it looked like a few of the spokes were laced differently from some of the  others.  Can't tell for sure from the photo.  Can you provide a photo with more pixels similar to the first photo?
I too agreed with Dan and I arranged for the wheel to be rebuilt by someone else.
I think Dans description of the spokes not being weaved is probably the closest.
Sorry the message  board restricts pixels or so it appeared when I tried to download the above ones.
Anyway, the wheel has set me back the price of a second build but I think worth it for the piece of mind.
I picked it up yesterday.
Now I need to acquire the Extra-wheel trailer frame, Ortlieb rear roller panniers and another E-werk.

Danneaux

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Re: Do you really need a buffer battery?
« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2014, 06:36:29 PM »
Hi Rif'!

So sorry the wheel required the expense of another build, but well worth it for peace of mind Out There.
Quote
Sorry the message  board restricts pixels or so it appeared when I tried to download the above ones.
No restriction on download size, but a 512MB limit *per post* on uploads to the board.

There's several ways 'round this. One is to store your photos at a host and then link to their location using HTML tags in your post. This way, the viewer's browser reaches for and inserts the photo for viewing. To come in under the limit on attachments, photos will almost always have to be reduced in size. I've posted the details on how to do this quickly and easily here: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=4313.0

Sounds like you're on your way to a wonderful charging-trailer setup.

All the best,

Dan.