Author Topic: Best Touring Tent  (Read 20328 times)

Danneaux

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2012, 06:43:15 AM »
My! What a wonderful tent, Pete! Looking at it initially, I was a bit concerned the head- and foot ends might come down enough to wet-out a sleeping bag at either end, but your nice diagram and link to the video show a nicely boxed inner tent and plenty of room in the inner tent. Extremely versatile, too. A good one, for sure! I'm glad you shared this, and I'll keep it in the back of my mind as a possible future replacement once mine bite the dust.

I like having the taller hoop at the head end of mine, but seeing yours in action, a central location is also nice and makes possible some configurations that wouldn't be possible otherwise. Boy, that vestibule is a gem, and the fly retracts for entry-exit as if by magic with that little windowblind-like red cord.

Back for another look at the video and supporting material you included; great post!

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2012, 06:50:01 AM by Danneaux »

Relayer

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2012, 09:50:48 AM »
Thanks Dan and Julian for the very helpful replies.

Altogether this thread has really got my enthusiasm for camping going again, and more than a little desire to try out cycle camping sometime.  I can't wait for springtime and I will definitely give the Hydra an airing, one way or another, this year. 

mylesau

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2012, 03:08:20 PM »
A little to the side or perhaps above the topic :P

I was a tent person, and still have one, but am sold on hammock camping.  They offer 2 stories of living space and allow you to sleep 'with' your bike...  I've never had a problem finding trees, posts or something to string up from.  I've no doubt I could use it as a bivy if I every really had to.

I've had it pour rain all night with about 6 inches of water flowing under me - glad I wasn't in a tent that night...  The photo on the side of the hill doesn't show the real slope - I could not have slept comfortably in a tent in that location.

Not knocking tents, but my preference goes to the hammock now - great for 'stealth' camping in the bush/scrub etc.








Danneaux

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2012, 04:27:12 PM »
Hi Myles,

I'm really intrigued by your hammock-tent solution; it really does allow for many possibilities beyond a tent, especially with the amount of water you encountered. What a fine-looking camp! I especially like Picture No. 3, where there is a "garage" for you and the bike.

Myles...as a hammock user, perhaps you can answer a couple questions that have always intrigued me...

1) Is it hard to enter and leave the hammock, especially when wet? Is there a special technique, or is it one of those things that becomes obvious when you have and use a hammock?

2) Do you sleep "flat" inside, or is there a parabolic arc, as with a regular hammock? If it is flat inside...how is that possible? Is there a suspended sub-floor of some sort?

Best,

Dan.

mylesau

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #34 on: February 11, 2012, 04:56:28 PM »
1) Is it hard to enter and leave the hammock, especially when wet? Is there a special technique, or is it one of those things that becomes obvious when you have and use a hammock?
No not at all.  You simply sit down in it and then swing your legs up.  It makes a very good seat and allows you to cook etc. whilst sitting down - very comfortable.  I have a full tarp over the hammock so it offers much more dry living space when it's raining than a typical low tent (you can stand up).  My hammock, a Warbonnet Blackbird (highly recommended), has bug netting over the top, which zips up completely to keep out  all the creepy crawlies.

2) Do you sleep "flat" inside, or is there a parabolic arc, as with a regular hammock? If it is flat inside...how is that possible? Is there a suspended sub-floor of some sort?
Yes you do sleep very flat.  The key to it is that you lie diagonally, not lengthways.  No sub-floor required.  You do need either a foam mat or what is called an under-quilt (a bit like a sleeping bag) to keep your butt/back warm.

Be very careful with the following links - once you start reading about hammocks you may get hooked!

Just Jeff's Hammock overview - a starter.

Hammock Forums - there is so much information here that it will truly make your head hurt!!!  All very good guys and a huge amount of information re everything hammock.

Shugemery's youtube channel - a real character, offering some very good video's of all things hammocks and a few other bits and pieces.  Shug is an entertainer by trade, so some of his videos are a bit off the wall, but good value :)
« Last Edit: February 11, 2012, 04:59:42 PM by mylesau »

stutho

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #35 on: February 11, 2012, 08:13:36 PM »
mylesau,

I too now love to hammock, I use DD hammock and tarp  I was just wondering what tarp you were using and how much weight you total system comes to.  Mine is a little heavy

Hammock inc. suspension 1kg
Tarp 0.75kg
 

mylesau

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2012, 02:33:09 AM »
I too now love to hammock, I use DD hammock and tarp  I was just wondering what tarp you were using and how much weight you total system comes to.  Mine is a little heavy

I ordered my tarp from Brandon, known as the Warbonnet guy on the Hammock Forum, to go with my hammock.  He doesn't make the exact same one any more or has changed the name, it is very similar to the Edge Tarp, but mine was a little larger I think.

I'm not big on weighing things much any more - have everything down to where I want it.

Taking the weights off the Warbonnet site:

Hammock: 765 grams (includes suspension system - straps - much quicker/easier and protect the tree)
Tarp: 285 grams (add Spectra lines - next to nothing, and a couple of pegs)
Top and Bottom Quilts: 600 grams x 2 - Jacks R Better - Hudson River

So complete, with very cosy sleeping quilts - 2.25 kg plus pegs.

I don't take both quilts in Australia - just one plus a silk sheet.  I bought two quilts for when I'm in New Zealand - they are good for well below 0 Celsius.

Danneaux

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #37 on: February 12, 2012, 07:57:23 AM »
Finally found a couple videos of my USD$60 1-person tent (closeout price; full retail was about USD$149 as I recall). It is possible to get a good, well-made inexpensive tent, though it is a real rarity in the marketplace, especially with quality zippers, seamless floor, taped seams, no-see-'em mesh and high-quality shock-corded alu poles. In response to those who have contacted me, a number of these are still available on the 'Net and US eBay for around USD$75-$100 new with shipping included.

I'm not the guy in the video and he doesn't tension it properly in his demo (wrinkles, strain), but it gives the general idea. It is not "lopsided" as the reviewer says, but intentionally asymmetrical to ensure a large side vestibule. Very easy entry-exit. It is not clear from the videos, but when the fly is open, the inner tent is still covered. The fly can be half-zipped for ventilation while it is raining. Vestibule is unfloored and spacious. Room for my helmet in the tail cone, HB bag by my head, rear panniers go in the side vestibule with ease, leaving plenty of room to roll in/out of the tent's full-length side entry.

Coleman Xponent Dakota 1 (made with uprated specs for Dick's Sporting Goods chain)
Video: Quick view of this tent: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgefQesrd7o
Video: Install the rainfly and easily slip inside: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xCDSwSKrjI

Similar-design competitors:
- Black Wolf Mantis 1: http://www.blackwolf.com.au/product-details.php?product_id=138&category_id=2&refine=fHx8Nnx8QnwxdG8y
- Gelert Solo 1 (very inexpensive, but beware; its fiberglass poles have been known to crack): http://www.gelert.com/products/solo_tent

It is fascinating to learn more about tent alternatives like hammocks and, of course, tarps. I have spent some time looking at ways to use a trailer as the base for a shelter as well as for hauling gear. Several people locally have done so, but none was really successful as a tent alternative.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2012, 09:22:58 AM by Danneaux »

AndrewC

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #38 on: February 12, 2012, 01:32:53 PM »
I've had a Hilleberg Akto for about 10 years, during which time I think I've spent nearly a year living in it, including 2 x 4 week trips.  It's durable, pleasant to live in and pretty bombproof. I've many friends with Nallo's who are also happy with their tents.

However, the Akto is quite low and when sitting down I need to crane my neck. As I get older this has become more & more uncomfortable, so it's been retired.

For a _very_ windy 2 week tour of Northern Scotland I used an MSR Hubba HP, which performed very well. My review is here http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=48829.0

I also use a Golite Shangri-La 3 which I reviewed here. http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=36550.0  I've recently bought the 3/4 groundsheet and separate insect net from Oookworks, but have only used the tent with the groundheet for 2 nights in January, so haven't formed a proper opinion of it yet.?

energyman

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #39 on: February 13, 2012, 10:40:31 PM »
Nallo GT or nothing !

jags

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #40 on: February 13, 2012, 11:53:39 PM »
ok great tent but man way to expensive :o :o

Pavel

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #41 on: February 17, 2012, 06:28:35 PM »
ok great tent but man way to expensive :o :o

The Thorn bike ... expensive next to my fuji touring lemon!  I think I will save my pennies for a Nalo GT.  At the rate my pennies are a rolling in, that means I may have their new improved 2018 models  :D.

Quality lingers long after the pain of price disappears!

Edit ... I knew I got that quote wrong.  I looked it up and it is by John Ruskin (was he a Thorn aficionado?)

“The bitterness of poor quality Lingers long after The sweetness of low price is forgotten.”

« Last Edit: February 17, 2012, 06:31:38 PM by Pavel »

Relayer

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #42 on: February 18, 2012, 09:47:42 AM »
Pavel, I like your version much better, now added as my signature   :D

pedalende73

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #43 on: March 08, 2012, 10:21:42 PM »
I was told the Hilleberg was an expensive alternative due to what you really get, so I was looking around some time and ended up with Exped Orion Extreme.
My requirements were: good height, freestanding, durable, good ventilation and not at least, green colour.
After some weekend-trips so far in winter/spring-conditions I must say I am very satisfied. Just noticed one thing: if you are taller than 190 centimeters the length of the innertent will maybe not fullfill your needs.

Happy camping :-)

jags

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #44 on: March 08, 2012, 10:29:44 PM »
this tent gets a fantastic review and thumbs up from a lad inthe fell club  very experience tourer and tent dweller  ;D ;DHelsport Fjellheimen 2 camp tent. looks class. and a lot less money than the nallo gt2.