Author Topic: Best Touring Tent  (Read 20340 times)

mickeg

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #105 on: September 24, 2017, 06:00:07 PM »
Above on page 6 in the middle of the page I described my new Big Agnes Scout Plus tent.

Soon after that I found another fantastic clearance price on the Big Agnes Super Scout tent.  That is a very similar design, it is a single wall tent designed to use two trekking poles instead of providing tent poles with it.  But the Super Scout has a enourmous vestibule.  Super Scout weighs a bit more at 1320 grams than the Scout Plus which is 1035 grams.  And as I noted above, I had to cut my own poles.  But this thing can be used to store massive amounts of gear.  The vestibule is about 7 feet or about 2 meters long.

I am keeping both tents, I will decide on future trips which tent to use based on how much space I anticipate having for the tent, is the extra ~~300 grams of weight a concern, potential for wind as I suspect that the Scout Plus (described and pictured on page 6) will hold up better in wind, etc. 

Big Agnes still makes the Scout Plus with a different color, but they appear to have discontinued the Super Scout.  And they make one without a vestibule but I would never buy that one.  As I noted in my previous post on page 6, these are single wall tents with potential for significant interior condensation.  I would never suggest either of these tents for two people for that reason, but as a solo where I can stay in the middle taller part of the tent, it works ok. 

It is a tradeoff between condensation in a single wall tent or using a heavier double wall tent that is more bulky when packed.  I still have my older double wall tents and expect at times to use them instead where weight is not an issue.

A couple photos of the Super Scout.  There are two tents in the first two photos, I am referring to the tent with a light gray roof that is much longer than the other dome shaped tent.  The third photo, I am looking out the tent door towards the vestibule where I have a bunch of gear scattered about.  I added a clothesline in the vestibule by adding a line to two existing sewn-in loops, I have a few items hanging from the line in the second and third photos.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2017, 06:05:59 PM by mickeg »

Danneaux

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #106 on: September 25, 2017, 01:40:07 AM »
Goodness! I realize I seem to be at the extremes here...

For over 30 years, my father and I each used Early Winters Pocket Hotel 3-layer single-wall GoreTex bivy-tents...24in/0.6m high at the entry, 19in/0.48m in the middle and the foot section like a sock, weight complete with stakes at 1kg each. Dad used his right up till he was 74 years old. Said getting in and out of the low little tent kept him limber. He was age 90 in the photos below.

In 2010, I upgraded to a larger 1-person Coleman eXponent [sic] Dakota 1 tent with side entry. Luxury, as I could at last sit up at the waist while inside and didn't need to crawl in and out on my back. I bought mine (three at the price) for USD$60 each on a half-price closeout sale. Good quality with polyester floor and fly and DAC aluminum poles.

The small tents work for me because I only use them for sleeping. If it is daylight and raining, I'm usually riding or standing around outside doing something like cooking. I can just store all my bags in the side vestibule of the Coleman when the fly is rigged. See: http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=3942.msg90686#msg90686

Both were a real contrast to my Dutch pal's Tatonka Alaska 3 DLX we used together on a 2008 tour of Netherlands and Belgium. That tunnel tent had a vestibule nearly as large as the sleeping compartment and measured 14.5ft/4.4m long. Current cost is a tick over 700.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2017, 07:21:05 AM by Danneaux »

julio

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #107 on: September 25, 2017, 04:04:58 PM »

Julio,

 Also bear in mind that with the Rainbow, you have to purchase the alu or carbon support poles. (Or use your own trekking poles.)

John


John,

To buy the alu or carbon support poles is only if i want to have a freestanding tent, but it's not essential i think..

On the other hand, i need to apply this : http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/practical/LC103.html

To sealing seams ...


mickeg

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #108 on: September 25, 2017, 04:44:21 PM »
Goodness! I realize I seem to be at the extremes here...

For over 30 years, my father and I each used Early Winters Pocket Hotel 3-layer single-wall GoreTex bivy-tents...24in/0.6m high at the entry, 19in/0.48m in the middle and the foot section like a sock, weight complete with stakes at 1kg each. ...

I never used a bivy, but I would not say you are at extremes.  I used to use a couple different one person tents that I could not get my gear into.  But after a lot of camping at campgrounds where people are wandering about, I decided I really need to get my gear more under cover.

First photo is a one person tent (2070 grams), small vestibule that I can get a good amount of gear into, but it still is pretty tight.  The photo is from a trip where we had vehicle support to haul gear, so my bike lacks racks in the photo.  Second photo (1670 grams), the vestibule is too small for more than two panniers.

I still have the tents in the photos, but expect to only use them where I have no potential theft concerns.

***

There is mention of trekking poles for putting up tents, above.  I bought a long 11mm aluminum pole (on Ebay, shipped from China, took a month) and cut it into several poles of the correct lengths to substitute for poles for my new Big Agnes tents that are considered trekking pole tents.  For biking that is the way to go, I can fold the pole to a pannier friendly length.  I also bought some trekking pole rubber tips that fit over that 11mm pole to put on the ends.  Works great.

julio

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #109 on: September 26, 2017, 03:46:11 PM »
Where it was on the first photo ? lovely landscape   ;)

mickeg

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Re: Best Touring Tent
« Reply #110 on: September 26, 2017, 03:59:47 PM »
Where it was on the first photo ? lovely landscape   ;)

If the question is about my photo in the post above yours, that was on the White Rim trail, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA.