Author Topic: Do I take a lock on a world tour??  (Read 9266 times)

Danneaux

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #45 on: March 12, 2018, 08:21:15 PM »
Bestbikelock.com did a test of the ABUS Bordo 6000-series link-locks, though the model they tested was not the combination model. Their results and review are here:
http://thebestbikelock.com/folding-locks/abus-bordo-6000-review/

The problem where I live is the portable electric angle grinder. They go through *any*thing (especially bike frames), given the opportunity. If complete bikes cannot be stolen, they are stripped quickly of their components. For example, I was dismayed on Friday to drive past two intact bicycles parked in our downtown here on my way to anappointment. 45 minutes later, I walked past them on another errand and saw the results below. All this in daylight (10:00-10:45) with heavy pedestrian traffic on the sidewalks in the busy business district.  :'(

Sadly, theft of all kinds is just a horrible, horrible problem where I live. This article from the local newspaper helps explain why:
http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/36509124-75/eugene-police-disregarded-about-one-third-of-daily-service-calls-in-2017.html.csp

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 08:57:01 PM by Danneaux »

mickeg

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #46 on: March 12, 2018, 11:07:19 PM »
Thanks for the link of the review.

If I have to park a bike in an area where I need a better lock, I am inclined to ride my Bridgestone instead.  I have ridden my Nomad downtown here a few times but when I did I parked it where there was a lot of visability and foot traffic.  The downtown and campus areas are the only parts of my community with a lot of bike theft, other areas are pretty safe.

If I recall correctly, your part of Oregon is considered the bike theft capital.

Of your two photos, that first bike is not much of a bike, why would they want the saddle?  Second photo, yeah the thief had a set of allen wrenches so they could take the stem cap off and slide the stem off the steerer tube, probably just cut the cables so they could get the brake levers and shifters in maybe less than a minute, and even the chain is missing.

***

When I toured Iceland, that entire island was so safe that I had only a very cheap cable lock.  Sometimes in campgrounds I did not bother to lock up the Nomad at all because it was so safe.

Danneaux

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #47 on: March 12, 2018, 11:48:52 PM »
Quote
If I recall correctly, your part of Oregon is considered the bike theft capital.
<nods> Yes, George, it is just terrible. Pretty much anything left out is subject to theft. What a sad state we've reached here.  :(

Out in the waning sunshine at the moment, about to hit the logging roads. A week of rain is forecast starting tomorrow. That won't keep me off the bike, but this is much more pleasant.

All the best,

Dan.

John Saxby

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #48 on: March 13, 2018, 12:15:36 AM »
Stealing a bike is such a low thing to do. I can understand stealing a car, robbing a bank, etc., but stealing a bike...

I guess it's a matter of the market for spares, and the need for quick cash.

mickeg

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #49 on: March 13, 2018, 01:51:49 AM »
Stealing a bike is such a low thing to do. I can understand stealing a car, robbing a bank, etc., but stealing a bike...

I guess it's a matter of the market for spares, and the need for quick cash.

My neighbor that is a bike mechanic works at a shop near campus of a large university.  He told me that several years ago there was a rash of thefts of high end bike parts.  On bikes with expensive brifters someone would cut the cables, pull off the stem cap, loosen the stem and slide it off the bike and be gone with it, leaving the bike behind.  They suspected he was selling off the brifters on Ebay or something like that.  Fairly new ultegra or dura ace brifters could sell for a lot at that time on Ebay. 

martinf

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #50 on: March 13, 2018, 09:43:02 AM »
If I have to park a bike in an area where I need a better lock, I am inclined to ride my Bridgestone instead.

When possible, if riding in what I consider high theft risk areas I either:

- use my old utility bike, with 3 locks, a frame lock to immobilise frame-rear wheel, a heavy chain to lock front wheel and frame to a post or similar, finally a small cable lock to lock my old home-made pannier bags to the rack. This bike has low theft value - well worn leather saddle more than 30 years old, obsolete 5 speed hub gear, old TA cranks, pedals from about 1980, etc.

- or I take my lightest Brompton folder, and carry it with me wherever I go (into the shops I visit, or to meetings, etc.)

I do have a reasonable quality Abus Granit Futura 64 U-Lock, which I use occasionally for parking one of my Thorn bikes, for example when shopping on tour.

Matt2matt2002

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #51 on: March 13, 2018, 08:59:13 PM »
Not a world tour ( yet 😉 ) but just back from my 4/5 week tour of Ethiopia.
I used a no name combo cable and rarely left the bike out of sight. At night the Raven was tucked up cozy with me in the guesthouse bedroom.

It's a risk factor game of chance. Reduce the odds as much as possible within the boundaries of personal beliefs.

Best security I had was am armed guard outside a bank I visited when changing money. But he wasn't portable. 😂
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

Pavel

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Re: Do I take a lock on a world tour??
« Reply #52 on: May 07, 2018, 06:29:12 PM »
Perhaps rather than locks, it may be most effective to buy a rear trailer and visit your local animal shelter for you new Pit Bull traveling companion. Make sure to pick up a six foot leash and a water bowl on you way home.