Author Topic: thorn chainguards  (Read 3849 times)

Danneaux

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2014, 03:26:49 AM »
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There is so much anecdotal evidence now about clean insides on Chaingliders with 3K+ of use, I'm starting to wonder what magice plastic the thing is made from. And whether it actually "glides" on the chain, or on some thin layer of air.
Andre,

Hebie's representative advised me to use a thin coating of light grease on the chain to minimize friction and noise inside the Chainglider (don't have one on my needed size, so I haven't tried this). I'm guessing the factory lube on a fresh chain is very close to a light grease for this purpose and accomplishes the same end. Thin grease might be worth trying for those who clean their chains in a solvent tank and then wish to recapture the "quiet effect" inside a Chainglider.

Best,

Dan.

John Saxby

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2014, 04:01:38 AM »
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I think there should be between 3mm and 6mm of movement.

Thanks for your well-advised note of caution, Andre.  You're the village elder in these matters--strictly from the POV of 'glider experience & wisdom, to be sure :-)  -- so I'll take note of your suggested 3 - 6 mm of play.  I've disassembled my 'glider for cleaning, so will try to be a bit more precise than just "wiggling" my chainring case when I reassemble it all.

PS on the matter of being an elder statesman:  You could be an experienced fundi rather than an mzee, if you wish. either one's a pretty good State of Being, I reckon.  I was grumbling a little while ago, on a skype with our daughter, about some major irritant, probably some SUV driver trying to kill me, I can't recall, and she said, knowing what the Proper Order of Things is in Africa, "Dad, you're an mzee now--you don't need this kind of thing."

Andre Jute

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2014, 06:55:33 AM »
I'm golden, John, definitely golden. Fundi! Love you too, man.

I like Mick and Dan's bash guards; they are aesthetically so much more pleasing than anything one can buy.

Dan, the representative of Hebie by the nature of his job must master a large, diverse catalogue of stuff. His refusal to believe something that Rolloff published on their own site after you told him of it persuades me that he hasn't yet found time to master the Chainglider. Until he does, I have no hesitation in believing I know more about it than he does, and, anyway, in general, I would on most subjects prefer the collected wisdom, experience and common sense on this forum to the dicta of someone junior and young enough to be answering emails for a great manufacturer and distributor. Returning to the Chainglider's innards, experience in use shows me no need whatsoever of additional grease or oil inside the Chainglider, and when I do, if ever, add anything I intend trying a stingy few dropa of Oil of Rolloff, a chain lubricant I've found very, very good before, and I'll be putting it on the chain, not on the surface of the Chainglider, which I can see and hear doesn't need assistance. Of course, when one of us hears from these people, it is good to share, so I don't want to discourage you; but I hope you'll take no offense when I say I attach higher credibility to the information you extracted from the engineer's desk (via his wife, i seem to recall) at Tout Terrain.

Danneaux

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2014, 07:22:20 AM »
Congratulations on your attainment of Superhero status (2,000 posts), Andre.

Best,

Dan.

Andre Jute

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2014, 07:31:29 AM »
Congratulations on your attainment of Superhero status (2,000 posts), Andre.

Good heavens! I hadn't noticed. Thanks, Dan.

John Saxby

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2014, 10:10:46 PM »
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Good heavens! I hadn't noticed.

The numbers just tick over unnoticed when you're having fun, Andre.  Well done!  :-)

Slammin Sammy

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2014, 06:10:12 PM »
Congrats, Andre! A truly Herculean effort - nearly an order of magnitude more posts than I.  :)

Dan, this probably calls for a new thread, doncha think?

And just watch out when you see him entering a phone box. You know the mild mannered, erudite Andre Jute is transforming into... Superhero Andre!

Whew!  :D ;)

Andre Jute

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2014, 12:29:26 AM »
"Superhero" sounds a bit like I'll be wearing my underjocks over my trousers from now on... The cost of fame is dignity.

Here's a superhero novel, written by Dakota Franklin, Andrew McCoy and me, that y'all can download free of charge in any format you want click the link or the cover:

Gauntlet Run: Birth of a Superhero

« Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 12:45:59 PM by Andre Jute »

JimK

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2014, 02:53:34 AM »
Hey this is non-stop action for sure! But even better - I was just driving north on US-206 past I-78 just about a week ago! Netcong!

... and quoting Jacques Ellul! Too much!
« Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 04:06:51 AM by JimK »

Andre Jute

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2014, 01:01:50 PM »
Hey this is non-stop action for sure! But even better - I was just driving north on US-206 past I-78 just about a week ago! Netcong!

... and quoting Jacques Ellul! Too much!

You'll enjoy this. The borough motto of Netcong is:
All roads lead to Netcong.

Honest. Makes you wonder what the cycling is like.

JimK

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2014, 03:37:10 PM »
That was my first time up in that little corner of New Jersey. I had gone down to Princeton to sell some books & figured I might as well do a little exploring on the way back so I hiked a bit of the Columbia Rail Trail, starting in Long Valley. I've been in some obscure parts of New Jersey before, but Netcong definitely qualifies!

But it is easy to sympathize. They're a tiny village. Not only does I-80 go through, which... I was going through around 6PM on a Sunday. I guess it was folks going back to the city after their weekend in the Poconos, but the road is like 5 lanes wide and just jammed with cars speeding and dodging between lanes... I was heading east to pick up I-287 and get back home. Anyway beyond I-80, US 206 and US 46 go through there. That little village is like a mega-interchange. They're tucked into a little valley. The sound of the traffic, all night long! I can see how it might feel like "All roads lead through Netcong!" I guess the official version is more poetic or something.

julio

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #26 on: November 04, 2017, 07:12:09 PM »
Hi all,

I'm planning to buy a alloy chainguard like this one
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/chainsets/thorn-high-quality-alloy-chainguard-for-110-pcd-rings-up-to-38t-black/

Acutally my chainring is an 40 teeth, but my next will certainly have 38 teeth.. someone can advise me which chainguard size do i need ?

As well, can i reuse my chainring bolt ?

mickeg

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #27 on: November 04, 2017, 11:00:03 PM »
Hi all,

I'm planning to buy a alloy chainguard like this one
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/chainsets/thorn-high-quality-alloy-chainguard-for-110-pcd-rings-up-to-38t-black/

Acutally my chainring is an 40 teeth, but my next will certainly have 38 teeth.. someone can advise me which chainguard size do i need ?

As well, can i reuse my chainring bolt ?

Did you read this (which I pasted here from the SJS link that you posted):

   Details
   This chainguard fits in place of an outer chainring on a double/triple, can be made to fit as well as three rings by using longer
   bolts and  4.6mm spacers if the crank has enough space between the arm and the outer ring. If in doubt ring for advice.


So, do you plan to remove one chain ring and install that instead?  If so, you can re-use your chainring bolts.

julio

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #28 on: November 05, 2017, 04:05:27 PM »
Ok but i don't want to change my chainring now, so i don't know if i can use a chainguard up to 38 t with my actual chainring 40 t .. ?    :-\

martinf

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Re: thorn chainguards
« Reply #29 on: November 05, 2017, 07:20:14 PM »
You didn't say what you wanted the chainguard for:

1 keeping trousers or legs clean
2 stopping the chain jumping off the chainring (IMO very unlikely with a Rohloff)
3 as a bashguard to protect the chainring from rocks

For 1, the Hebie Chainglider works OK, and also protects the chain, in my experience prolonging chain life and reducing the need to clean chainring/sprocket and chain.
The Chainglider works best with a narrow chainring like the Surly stainless steel. And only with some combinations - AFAIK 40T doesn't work, but 38T x 16T and 38T x 17T do work.
I don't think the Chainglider will work well as a bashguard.

For 2, I used an old chainring with the teeth cut off and filed smooth. This worked with a single chainring and rear derailleur. It would probably have worked with the teeth still on, but looked better without. Mine was 4 teeth bigger than the chainring.

For 3, an old chainring several teeth bigger should work (I reckon at least 6), or a purpose made chainguard like the Thorn. I may be wrong, but I think the one designed for a 38T ring would be too small to properly protect a 40T ring.

To fit a Thorn chainguard to a Rohloff bike, the best way is probably to get a longer bottom bracket axle, double chainring bolts rather than single, fit the chainguard in the outer position and the chainring in the inner position. If you have enough space between crank and chainring you might be able to fit the chainguard outboard of the chainring, so just need spacers and double or triple chainring bolts.