Author Topic: OEM2 plate orientation  (Read 1682 times)

buffet

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OEM2 plate orientation
« on: December 24, 2020, 08:53:38 PM »
I have recently installed a Rohloff on my Kona Unit using OEM2 plate and Monkey bone, cables route via seatstay. Now that Iím looking at the permitted OEM2 setups, I donít see any variant resembling my setup. Could the gurus here glance at the pic of my setup and tell me whether it is ok?  (everything works fine btw)

PH

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2020, 09:43:23 PM »
Looks fine to me.
If we forget for a moment that it's a sliding dropout and treat it as a normal vertical, the important thing is that where the OEM2 plate secures to the bolt, or Monkey Bone in your case, is behind the dropout.  Rohloff advise that the torque may rotate the hub out of the dropout otherwise.  I've just fitted a Monkey Bone to my folder, the manufacturer placed the hole for the securing bolt forwards, so either they didn't know or Rohloff have changed the advise, I rode several thousand miles in happy ignorance! I can't think of any reason why the sliding dropout should behave any different to a fixed one. 
Maybe the reason you can't find anything similar on the Rohloff website is that they'll assume anyone with sliding dropouts will go for an OM1 plate and a Rohloff specific slider, which is probably what I would have done. 
I know a couple of people with seatstay cable runs, though I can't remember what dropouts they have, the only caution is to not let water run down the cables into the box.  couple of things you might do - a few wraps of insulation tape on the cable a cm above just to break the flow, and pack the heads of the hollow screws with waterproof grease.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2020, 09:45:18 PM by PH »

buffet

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2020, 07:18:22 PM »
Thank you, PH. The reason I haven't gone for OEM1 plate is the proprietory version of Kona's sliding dropouts - looks so similar to Paragon, but it's not compatible. And Kona is not making a Rohloff-specific slider, only the conventional QR-type and Thru-axle type.

buffet

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2020, 03:38:23 PM »
One post from MTBR on the subject got me paranoid - it claimed that one of the reasons for gear slippage could be lost freewheel springs, which one could loose when changing axle plate orientation on the external mech.

It seems like this explanation is not 100% accurate: when you change the axle plate (OEM/OEM2 whatever) orientation on the external gear arm, after unscrewing 5 torx20 bolts, you actually remove the axle plate, but you do not expose the springs. Those springs are only exposed when you lift the whole external gear arm from the hub, which is a step that is not necessary for the change of axle plate orientation.

If you were to convert from internal gear mech to external one, then it's a different story - you do have to lift the internal mechanism and expose the springs before putting the external mech on.

Long story short: am I corrrect that if you are changing the external mech axle plate orientation (transferring Rohloff to a new frame or changing your cable routing), then you do not have to worry about those springs coming loose, flying off, whatever?

The image shows the external gear arm with axle plate removed. The springs in question are actually behind those pegs that I've circled in blue color, they protect the springs from getting lost when the axle plate is removed.


PH

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2020, 04:01:39 PM »
Long story short: am I corrrect that if you are changing the external mech axle plate orientation (transferring Rohloff to a new frame or changing your cable routing), then you do not have to worry about those springs coming loose, flying off, whatever?
Yes that's correct, on your gear change you would need to remove the transfer box to expose the springs. 
This video about how to convert from internal to external shifting, shows this clearly (Is that where your image comes from?)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGNFZjavXcI
« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 04:07:32 PM by PH »

buffet

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2020, 05:24:03 PM »
Thanks, PH. Yes, I took a screenshot from that video, because I forgot to take a picture when I removed the axle plate from my hub.

GamblerGORD649

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2020, 06:55:52 AM »
I was also playing around with the 3 nutted bolt plates I got. Needed to pick one.
So I had the 5 screws out, then picked it up the wheel and the rest fell off. LOL. So the springs and the 2 gears dropped on the floor. I then spent a half hour figuring out the way the 2 gears need to be lined up. Plus the damn disc won't slip off over the shift box and bolt sticking out. The 2 springs will need to be changed sometime.

Captain Bubble

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2021, 10:04:25 PM »
I wouldn't mount the gear cable box in that position. You are asking for trouble with it filling up with water and corroding the inner cable within which will go into the cable casing and likely over time cause additional resistance to the gear shift. I would mount it so the gear shifter cables run along the left chainstay under the bottom bracket and up the underside of the down tube.

Captain Bubble

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2021, 10:09:20 PM »
Looks fine to me.
If we forget for a moment that it's a sliding dropout and treat it as a normal vertical, the important thing is that where the OEM2 plate secures to the bolt, or Monkey Bone in your case, is behind the dropout.  Rohloff advise that the torque may rotate the hub out of the dropout otherwise.  I've just fitted a Monkey Bone to my folder, the manufacturer placed the hole for the securing bolt forwards, so either they didn't know or Rohloff have changed the advise, I rode several thousand miles in happy ignorance! I can't think of any reason why the sliding dropout should behave any different to a fixed one. 
Maybe the reason you can't find anything similar on the Rohloff website is that they'll assume anyone with sliding dropouts will go for an OM1 plate and a Rohloff specific slider, which is probably what I would have done. 
I know a couple of people with seatstay cable runs, though I can't remember what dropouts they have, the only caution is to not let water run down the cables into the box.  couple of things you might do - a few wraps of insulation tape on the cable a cm above just to break the flow, and pack the heads of the hollow screws with waterproof grease.

But this only applies to vertical drop outs not horizontal ones. The Rohloff manual is quite clear on this. In any case how could the hub be twisted down wards out of a horizontal drop out? It's not going to happen.

PH

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2021, 10:52:33 PM »
But this only applies to vertical drop outs not horizontal ones. The Rohloff manual is quite clear on this. In any case how could the hub be twisted down wards out of a horizontal drop out? It's not going to happen.
Err, did you miss the sentence before?
Quote
]If we forget for a moment that it's a sliding dropout and treat it as a normal vertical, the important thing is that where the OEM2 plate secures to the bolt, or Monkey Bone in your case, is behind the dropout.
I was answering the question asked, that's the context.

rualexander

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Re: OEM2 plate orientation
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2021, 11:31:26 AM »
I wouldn't mount the gear cable box in that position. You are asking for trouble with it filling up with water and corroding the inner cable within which will go into the cable casing and likely over time cause additional resistance to the gear shift. I would mount it so the gear shifter cables run along the left chainstay under the bottom bracket and up the underside of the down tube.
Mine has been fitted in a similar orientation to the OP for ten years.
Only suitable orientation due to chainstay torque arm and rear rack making other options unviable.
No problem with water or corrosion, just stick some grease inside it.