Author Topic: Are tubeless tyres worth it?  (Read 3711 times)

energyman

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Re: Are tubeless tyres worth it?
« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2021, 10:18:54 AM »
 ;D   Dan, you are Magic !!  :):):):)

JohnR

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Re: Are tubeless tyres worth it?
« Reply #31 on: September 12, 2021, 05:03:06 PM »
On the fitting JohnR, Jan Heine at Rene Herse recommends fitting tubes first as standard practice with their tyres, which have very flexible carcasses and are notorious for being hard to set up. Except that he doesn't do any miles on them with tubes - just fits them, inflates the tyre till it locks to the rim, deflates, unhooks one side, removes tube, refits the side, add sealant, amd inflates. Seems to think it always works.
My limited experience suggests that a folding tyre needs time on the rim with a tube in order to get rid of the kinks in the sidewall where the tyre had been folded . A gap of a few mm caused by one of these kinks will let the air out faster than it can be blown in. Warmth and sunshine might help in this process which, in my case, are better obtained when the bike is outside (depending on the weather) than being in the garage. I had found that one 27 mile ride wasn't enough to get the tyre into shape but it seated OK after another three rides.

I've often had one side of a tyre seated on the rim but there's a gap on the other side too big for my inflation system to overcome. I suspect that some tyre - rim combinations work better than others.

geocycle

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Re: Are tubeless tyres worth it?
« Reply #32 on: September 12, 2021, 06:27:18 PM »
On the fitting JohnR, Jan Heine at Rene Herse recommends fitting tubes first as standard practice with their tyres, which have very flexible carcasses and are notorious for being hard to set up. Except that he doesn't do any miles on them with tubes - just fits them, inflates the tyre till it locks to the rim, deflates, unhooks one side, removes tube, refits the side, add sealant, amd inflates. Seems to think it always works.
My limited experience suggests that a folding tyre needs time on the rim with a tube in order to get rid of the kinks in the sidewall where the tyre had been folded . A gap of a few mm caused by one of these kinks will let the air out faster than it can be blown in. Warmth and sunshine might help in this process which, in my case, are better obtained when the bike is outside (depending on the weather) than being in the garage. I had found that one 27 mile ride wasn't enough to get the tyre into shape but it seated OK after another three rides.

I've often had one side of a tyre seated on the rim but there's a gap on the other side too big for my inflation system to overcome. I suspect that some tyre - rim combinations work better than others.

Yes I agree. I had to replace a tyre and could not get the new one to seat properly despite having one of those pumps with a high pressure chamber. After several fruitless attempts and much swearing I put a tube in. I left it on for a couple of days but didnít ride on it. I then carefully removed the tube through one bead with the wheel horizontal across a bucket, I put the valve in and fitted the bead. It inflated first time. I then removed the valve core and added sealant, reinflated and all has been well.
 

Moronic

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Re: Are tubeless tyres worth it?
« Reply #33 on: September 13, 2021, 01:18:36 PM »
Thanks John and Geocycle good info for when I'm due for new rubber.