Author Topic: Kevin Sayles 2nd hand Thorn EXP Project  (Read 1038 times)

martinf

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Re: Kevin Sayles 2nd hand Thorn EXP Project
« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2020, 11:04:50 PM »
I used a hacksaw to cut, holding the stays in a bench vice. Then files to smooth and round off the cut edges. I also bent the stays to fit the mountings better, again using the bench vice and a large adjustable spanner.

If you have a bench (or old table or similar) one or two C-clamps might work as a substitute for the bench vise, or you could take the stays to a friend or acquaintance who has a bench vise.

But I second John's advice, my bench vice was one of the first tools I bought when I first set up home 40 years ago, it has been extremely useful for all kinds of things, not just bicycles.

leftpoole

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Re: Kevin Sayles 2nd hand Thorn EXP Project
« Reply #16 on: May 01, 2020, 12:18:18 PM »
Hello,
Yes indeed a Record or similar brand bench vise costs not a great deal and over a short time will recoup its worth.
Best to all,
John

John Saxby

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Re: Kevin Sayles 2nd hand Thorn EXP Project
« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2020, 02:05:21 AM »
'Kay, Phil, here you go:

Below, a photo of my Record 4" No. 3 vise, Made in England.  (!!)  It has a rotating base -- the long bolt head protruding from the base of the vise, immediately below the "Record" name, is one of two which fix or release the vise.

(Full disclosure: Having recommended a vise with rotating base, and indeed having purchased one, I have to confess I've never used this feature.)

Look at the slightly open jaws, and facing you, is one of my pair of magnetic work protectors. These items have a band of ~1/8" thick ribbed red dense-but-slightly-soft rubber which grips the work.  The jaws of the vise are knurled -- OK for anything where it doesn't matter if the surface is marred, but not what you want for holding a steel or alloy bike rack.

What will you use vise and magnetic inserts for?  Well, just last week I had to cut a couple of 2" sections of 3/4" x 3/4" angle alloy, and then drill each with 4 holes to accept wood screws. The two bits of angle alloy were fastened to two old but quite lovely kitchen-counter bar stools, whose legs and seats were flexing far too much.

I could not have done this repair without the item you are looking at. (Plus a good hacksaw and 3/8" electric drill, of course.)

Why would I repair two old wooden bar stools?  Well, there's a story here that Andre will enjoy if he's reading this:  We were leaving South Africa in 2006, after spending three years in Pretoria, where my wife was working at the Canadian High Commission. Not far from her office was a small woodworking operation, which advertised "Furniture Made from Antique Oregon Pine".  I asked the owner where he got his wood. He said--get this--that his wood came from the ceilings and floors of old houses in Jo'burg and the wider Rand which were now being knocked down.  They had been the first houses built in the area after the goldmines were established in the 1880s -- that is, in the 1890s.  I also asked him about the "Oregon Pine", because I had noticed that the grain is more like a northern pine, denser than the southern pine grown in places like South Africa or Georgia and the Carolinas in the U.S.  He said he thought it had come from Oregon.  Could be--that pine in native to the Pacific NW of North America, though it seems a long way to ship it, across the Pacific & Indian Oceans...  In any event, we bought four chairs and three cabinets, and they grace our kitchen, dining room, and living room.  And my vise keeps 'em there.

Now, to help you with rough-and-ready repairs, take a look at the nice flat surface of the moving body of the vise, just above the "Made in England" casting:  I use this as an anvil to hammer flat anything that's fairly thin and needs to be, well, flattened. For this I have a very useful 2-lb bench sledge hammer.

Good luck, eh?

Cheers,  John

onmybike

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Re: Kevin Sayles 2nd hand Thorn EXP Project
« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2020, 02:08:43 AM »
I asked the owner where he got his wood. He said--get this--that his wood came from the ceilings and floors of old houses in Jo'burg and the wider Rand which were now being knocked down.  They had been the first houses built in the area after the goldmines were established in the 1880s -- that is, in the 1890s.  I also asked him about the "Oregon Pine", because I had noticed that the grain is more like a northern pine, denser than the southern pine grown in places like South Africa or Georgia and the Carolinas in the U.S.  He said he thought it had come from Oregon. 

John, in the Australian goldrush in the 1850s pre-fab housing was a common thing and flat pack dwellings were shipped to Oz from all over the British Empire but also from the US. The British houses were frequently made from tin and iron components - products of the industrial revolution. The US houses were made of west coast timbers and (I think) either shipped as preassembled walls etc, or simply as pre-cut and labeled timber planks. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the later South African gold rush followed a similar pattern and used the same supply chains.

Syd

Edit: Just found a nice story on gold rush kit homes here: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-03/tiny-kit-homes-helped-solve-melbourne-gold-rush-housing-crisis/9680898
« Last Edit: May 03, 2020, 02:15:02 AM by onmybike »

John Saxby

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Re: Kevin Sayles 2nd hand Thorn EXP Project
« Reply #19 on: May 03, 2020, 02:13:21 PM »
Thanks, Syd -- hugely interesting detail of early globalisation!  The imperatives of gold generate all sorts of innovation, eh?  Good to know that the three Melbourne dwellings have been preserved.

I had thought that I might have been looking, not at west-coast pine, but pine from the Ottawa Valley or New Brunswick. Both of those sources are relatively close to SA, and the Ottawa Valley was past its peak, but still producing a lot of timber.  I expect that the knowledge of the supply chains from the mid-19th century would have survived, as you say, and the west-coast pine was still there.

The house we live in in Ottawa was built in 1907, originally a frame (timber) house, later covered with brick.  It's quite modest, but there's a lot of BC fir in its interior construction. That lumber is highly prized today because it's comparatively scarce. A friend who's a builder reckons that whoever built our house probably bought a load cheap from BC.

A nice detail in our SA furniture is the old rectangular nailholes, all filled as part of the reclamation process, but still visible.

Cheers,  John

Philly69

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Re: Kevin Sayles 2nd hand Thorn EXP Project
« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2020, 09:44:15 AM »
I purchased a large Kevin Sayles  2nd hand Thorn EXP frame last year for 120 including postage. It comes with the original drop handlebars and it's a Prototype model from around 2000. I was informed by the seller that it belonged to the now sadly deceased Audax cyclist David Lewis http://www.ukcyclist.co.uk/david-lewis

David mentions in the website link, buying 2 Exp's: "I had bought two Expedition Touring bikes from Thorn Cycles, took them to Sri Lanka with me and Anne & I undertook a three week bike tour of as much as the island as was accessible at that time." A strange coincidence is that my mate bought Anne's Exp off her. What are the chances of that??

Anyway, the bike needs a bit of TLC. I'm planning on keeping the frame paint job as is and just sanding down the flaky paint/rust spots and repainting with enamel paint. I want to replace the handlebars with straight one's which will mean changing the brake levers, grips and shifters. Any recommendations here?

I've already removed the BB which had a lot of play in it. I'll keep the XT crankset + derailleurs although I'll probably upgrade the jockey wheels and chainrings and get a new chain and cassette.

I'm debating whether to replace the forks with originals as the one's on it at the moments aren't original. Judging by the fact that there's a Mavic 317 on the front instead of the Sunrim Rhyno it came with originally, I suspect the bike has been in a crash. I've checked the head tube and there doesn't seem to be any damage to the welds.

I'll keep the SKS mudguards which are in OK condition except for a bit of a crack on the rear one.

The idea is to keep the bike looking a bit tatty so as to deter thieves, as I already own a mint condition Thorn Raven Tour. Any thoughts on this little project welcome.