Author Topic: Going tubeless (conversions)  (Read 424 times)

in4

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Going tubeless (conversions)
« on: January 15, 2020, 10:00:52 PM »
[Split from another topic when the content wandered... Dan.]

In response to a topic...
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Just found this little write up from a new Nomad owner which some of you may find interesting:https://www.reddit.com/r/Touringbicycles/comments/dgxoia/new_thorn_nomad_mk3/
... posted by Brummie here...
http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=13682.0
Ian asked...
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Are those tubeless tyres available for Mk2 Nomad's?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 01:10:26 AM by Danneaux »

Danneaux

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Re: Going tubeless (conversions)
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2020, 12:06:00 AM »
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Are those tubeless tyres available for Mk2 Nomad's?
Ian,

There's nothing about the model of bike that is a requirement; rather the possibilities are in the rim and tire components. Conversions are possible with varying degrees of success -- it depends on the components used.

Here's links to a couple of videos that explain what's involved:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuEiBSAKWLI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zI9DM34LHAo

All the best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 01:06:16 AM by Danneaux »

in4

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Re: Going tubeless (conversions)
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2020, 12:24:08 AM »
Many thanks, Dan. Heading on over to You tube now
Ian
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 01:06:33 AM by Danneaux »

Danneaux

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Re: Going tubeless (conversions)
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2020, 01:02:14 AM »
There's some conditions that affect successful use in the field...

1) The sealant used in tubeless tires doesn't last as long/work as well in extreme heat -- at least based on the conversions I've done for friends. This is why I have held off on converting my Nomad's rims for my desert tours. Temperatures on the dry lake beds can reach 51C/124F ambient, 60C/140F at the surface and this tends to dry the sealant out (it can even loosen vulcanized tube patches). If you're a Formula One racing fan as I am, notice the air vs track temperatures posted on the TV screen next time you watch. The differential can be surprisingly high, and tires are right down there on the surface, so they are affected most. This might be a factor if you choose to tour Australia in the heat of summer.

2) When mounting tubeless tires, it is helpful to have an inflation system that can deliver a high-pressure "puff" of air to fully seat the bead. There are "charger" floor pumps that do this, a few hand pumps, and of course co2 cartridges. You can also get 'round all that with a few tricks. One closest to what I use is shown in a video at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE3h4nmDdOo Of course, a valve with a removable core is required, but this is pretty much standard procedure when going tubeless.

3) It is still helpful to carry a spare tube or two in the event you develop a puncture and your sealant has dried up, particularly if you are dealing with a big hole. Getting back on the road again quickly is then a matter of removing the tubeless valve and substituting the tube with its attached valve. Remounting the tire can be a little more difficult because you have the tube volume in there as well, but not too bad. You can then remove the tube and refit the tubeless valve after refilling with fresh sealant at your convenience. Of course, carrying a plug is also a convenient way to fix a hole that is too large for the sealant alone to close.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 01:06:44 AM by Danneaux »