Author Topic: Bicycle Parts made New  (Read 1381 times)

tyreon

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Bicycle Parts made New
« on: November 18, 2019, 05:27:40 PM »
I am wondering how much it would cost to get an extinct bicycle part made new? And were I would source a manufacturer? Some machinist?

It appears I can manufacture a snub nosed Smith and Wesson .45 using a 3D printer,so I guess I can find someone who could manufacture some seatpost saddle clamp I want.

What I am looking for is the Kore adaptor that makes taking a twin rail saddle a possibility. I have found this adaptor impossible to obtain or purchase.

Ideas?

Yes,I bought a new seat post. But the saddle clamp does not allow the saddle to be tilted a tad to how I'd like it.

A new saddle clamp in the existing seatpost? Madness? How easy is this!

Danneaux

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Re: Bicycle Parts made New
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2019, 06:16:11 PM »
It is actually pretty easy to commission parts to be made using an online vendor. The key is usually to first upload a CAD file of the design, get a quote and then proceed from there. Some firms offer free access to simple CAD programs so you can create and upload drawings of what you need for a quote. Costs are usually determined by aggregating production costs -- materials, setup, runtime -- then dividing per hour costs based on estimated production time.

Just Google "online machining" or "online 3D printing" and you'll find resources by country.

However, if all you need is a rwin-rail adapter, you'll find it cheaper and more quickly in a ready-made production part like this one:
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/saddles/breezer-brooks-saddle-sandwich-combi-twin-rail-saddle-adaptor/

If this comes close, then it might be possible to modify it to need using common hand tools.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 06:27:28 PM by Danneaux »

tyreon

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Re: Bicycle Parts made New
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2019, 07:56:42 PM »
Firstly Danneux,thank you for the reply.

Next,I think a may have misguided you. I have a monorail saddle on a folding bike. By twin rail saddle I meant...two railed saddle. You know,the ordinary saddle with rails either side.

At present I can alter my saddle fore and aft,and alter its elevation down/up. Howsoever,the saddle maybe a little unforgiving and I want to choose from a number of saddle options as is offered by the regular two-railed saddles available.

See the picture below:

http://www.enhancestyleteam.com/kore-i-beam-seatpost-adapter/

I just cannot buy this thing anywhere. So one option is to have something like it made.

Option two: Buy a new seatpost. Done. But herein the seatpost has a secured bottom clip that only goes someway to allowing me to tilt the saddle a tad,not a tad +3 or 4. Yes I can move the saddle fore and aft,and maybe down. But up,No.

I haven't measured the seatpost to see if I could dismiss the saddle clip fittings for another yet. And don't know if another would fit the seat tube diameter well. Then how easy would it be getting 'the set' seatpost set clip out!

Something easy turning out surprisingly complex.


tyreon

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Re: Bicycle Parts made New
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2019, 08:00:56 PM »
I see Bromptons pentaclip offers a great variety of saddling positions: fore,aft,up-and-down tilt.

Maybe commission something like it or the Kore adapter?

John Saxby

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Re: Bicycle Parts made New
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2019, 02:19:33 AM »
Quote
Maybe commission something like it

Here's a source that may offer some options:  If you're in the UK (the "tyre" suggests so), the vintage motorcycle clubs all have spares schemes which supply new spare parts for old bikes, made to antique specs in low-volume runs. There's an entire cottage industry turning out machined and cast creations using modern metallurgy and fabricating tools. I can vouch for the quality of the products, having restored an ex-comp AJS scrambler a few years ago.

I expect the officer in charge of a club's spares scheme could put you in touch with likely supplier(s).

Examples of the clubs would include the BSA Owners' Club, Triumph ditto, AJS & Matchless ditto, Norton ditto, and if you're feeling really flush, the Vincent OC.

Cheers,  John

Danneaux

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Re: Bicycle Parts made New
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2019, 05:01:27 AM »
Tyreon,

There's a KORE i-Beam mono- to twinrail adapter currently available from a shop in Malaysia here:
https://www.rodalink.com/my/catalog/product/view/id/11565/s/kore-rail-adapter-for-seat-post

Listed cost converts to a pretty reasonable price, so even if shipping were pretty steep it might be worth it. If delivery is only available locally, then perhaps a store in Puchong, Selangor (where Rodalink is located) might reship to you for a fee. I've found M'sian shops to be very accommodating of my distant ordering needs. A Google search shows these adapters are more common in Asia; I saw one available in Singapore on their version of Gumtree/Craigslist.

I have learned some new-in box Kore i-Beam seatposts included the adapter as well as the post for T-rail saddles, so it might be worth looking to see if you can find one of these on eBay. Last I saw, they were going for about USD$15, in the UK for about 20. Have you written Kore or the "D" or "T" brand maker of your bike? Either or both might have the adapters available. Looking at how the saddles sit and where you have a Folder, it appears to me a railed saddle on an adapter will stand more proud of the seat collar than the i-Beam/T-rail combo, so your folded size may be larger than original once you convert to a conventional railed saddle.

The piece doesn't look that difficult to reproduce...it needn't be as complicated as the KORE adapter. All you really need is an adapter shaped like this in end view:

)=====(

The vertical "fins" tying to the KORE mounting bolts in the "official" adapter appear to be for convenience in fitting rather than necessity. I really don't think you'd even need a machinist to make one...just a drill press and a chunk of aluminum. I'd take a 12.5mm/1/2in thick piece of aluminum and drill two 7mm/9/32in holes of the proper spacing through it vertically, then split it halfway through the holes' diameter and call it good. All you'd need to do is slide this "adapter" between the saddle rails and then affix the KORE side plates and...done. Looked at this way, you may have more flexibility in manufacturing options, as John suggests.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2019, 08:17:02 PM by Danneaux »

tyreon

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Re: Bicycle Parts made New
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2019, 09:12:36 AM »
John and Danneux ,a big thank you. I actually think you have me fixed here.

On the Rodalink contact: I did manage to contact one of their suppliers and they said they said they would get back to me: they didn't. Tried agin,and their website wouldn't allow me to buy the product. A friend(in Australia)contacted her relative in Malaysia who tried to contact Rodalink in Malaysia who still had no joy! So I've been around the world.

Very good advice from both of you. You know,I think I'm gonna crack this one.Still a mile to go,but I think I can see the finish line.

Ta