Author Topic: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3  (Read 2672 times)

Danneaux

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Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« on: July 29, 2019, 07:35:20 PM »
Thorn's Instagram and SJS Cycles announced a new Nomad Mk 3 today.

Some changes and refinements I noticed...
New paint options: Gunmetal Imron, Red Imron, British Racing Green Imron. I don't see Matte Black or Tonka Yellow listed as options. Logos and labels have been updated to match rest of the current line.

A new right dropout with a 2-bolt adapter that allows either a smooth face ("dropout blanking plate") for Rohloff use or an optional derailleur adapter for preference or emergency. I spotted a cable stop on the underside of the right (drive side) chainstay in one of the Instagram photos.

Both the main frame and the Mk3 (rim brake only) forks have removeable/reversible v-brake bosses sized to fit either 26in or 650b wheel sizes. SJS Cycles notes, "Sufficient clearance for use with mudguards and 26" tyres up to 2.35" or 650b tyres up to 60b". Forks "...Available in three different offsets to suit the corresponding Thorn Nomad Mk3 frames".
...and...
"Actual offset in millimetres provided to allow fitment to other makes or frames.
- Offset A = 48 mm
- Offset B = 53 mm
- Offset C = 60 mm"
Not sure if they are a suitable retrofit for Mk2 frames.

There is a new disc fork that is Boost compatible with bolted through-axle and room for very big tires. the double-plate crown in the IG photo looks wider than the one on my Mk2 Nomad.

Not confirmed, but the head tube looks a little taller -- extends further above the top tube -- than the one on my Mk2 Nomad, more like on the later Raven compared to the older Raven Tour. This would leave more room for Thorn's bolt-on steering limiter (designed to increase stability while parked and to prevent a headlight from bashing the downtube): https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/frames/thorn-steering-lock-limiter-striker-for-37-mm-head-tubes-1-18-inch-steerers/?geoc=US

Looks like there are different/additional downtube cable guides compared to my Mk2 Nomad.

There may be other refinements, but I spotted these at a glance and thought I'd share. IG photos below.

Best,

Dan.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2019, 03:44:22 AM by Danneaux »

mickeg

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2019, 02:40:43 AM »
I initially was a bit bummed on the large jumps between gears on my Nomad with Rohloff.  If I had a derailleur hanger for a chain tensioner I might have considered setting up a half step gearing system.  My two derailleur touring bikes have half step gearing plus granny (triple cranks), so I am used to the half step concept.  But I got used to the big jumps between gears on the Rohloff, no longer interested in that.  My point is that I might have got the derailleur hanger option for my Nomad if it was available, but now no longer interested.

I wonder if they still put the brakes on the back side of the fork?  I found several reasons to be frustrated with that, I would have preferred that they built the fork like everyone else with the brakes on the front.

The gray color looks very nice.  I like the new graphics too.  The gray looks exactly like the gray that I had on my 1989 Jeep Comanche Pickup Truck.  I drove that truck for 17 years.

If the headtube is taller, that could complicate putting on suspension forks.  I bought a new old stock RockShox (spell?) XC32 100mm suspension fork for my Nomad size 590M about five years ago.  The steerer tube was uncut and it was a bit shorter than I wanted but I found most other forks that I looked at had a steerer tube that was even shorter.  If my headtube was longer, I would have had more frustration in the process of trying to fit a suspension fork.

I see the rear frame disc mount is in the same place and same type, not the newer flat mount and not on the left chainstay.  Some bikes now put it on the chainstay to reduce interference with rack mounts. 

One of the photos that shows the rear dropouts shows air holes into the tubing.  When I built up my Nomad, I applied Frame Saver to the insides of the frame although I suspected I really did not need it.  But with those air holes (intended to allow the air in the frame to stay at atmospheric pressure during welding) will allow water to get into the frame, that makes treating the inside of a frame more important.

The photo that had the headtube in it, in the background there was a belt for belt drive.

I have no desire to switch to through axle on any of my bikes.  But, when I built up my Titanium bike two years ago, the rear dropouts were attached to the frame with a couple small screws, one set of dropouts for 135mm conventional dropouts or I could have gotten dropouts for 142mm through axle instead.  (I got 135mm conventional.)  It looks like that option does not exist on the new Nomad, so the only through axle option would be the fork.

Dave Whittle Thorn Workshop

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2019, 09:44:20 AM »
Quote
If the headtube is taller, that could complicate putting on suspension forks.  I bought a new old stock RockShox (spell?) XC32 100mm suspension fork for my Nomad size 590M about five years ago.  The steerer tube was uncut and it was a bit shorter than I wanted but I found most other forks that I looked at had a steerer tube that was even shorter.  If my headtube was longer, I would have had more frustration in the process of trying to fit a suspension fork.

The Mk3 doesn't take suspension forks at all, hardly anyone went with suspension forks.

Quote
I see the rear frame disc mount is in the same place and same type, not the newer flat mount and not on the left chainstay.  Some bikes now put it on the chainstay to reduce interference with rack mounts.

Flat mount limits rotor size, on the chainstay cable pull brakes can get water and dirt trapped in the cable outer.

Quote
One of the photos that shows the rear dropouts shows air holes into the tubing.  When I built up my Nomad, I applied Frame Saver to the insides of the frame although I suspected I really did not need it.  But with those air holes (intended to allow the air in the frame to stay at atmospheric pressure during welding) will allow water to get into the frame, that makes treating the inside of a frame more important.

The new Nomad frames are ED coated inside to prevent corrosion, the holes are necessary to make sure the excess ED coating drains when they are removed from the tank. Some people choose to seal these with Araldite when building up the bike, we can if you wish.

Quote
I have no desire to switch to through axle on any of my bikes.  But, when I built up my Titanium bike two years ago, the rear dropouts were attached to the frame with a couple small screws, one set of dropouts for 135mm conventional dropouts or I could have gotten dropouts for 142mm through axle instead.  (I got 135mm conventional.)  It looks like that option does not exist on the new Nomad, so the only through axle option would be the fork.

Yes we wanted to stick with Q/R for the rear, the main customer base for our Nomads still want Rohloff and Rohloff say the Q/R version of their hub still functions the best with the least issues.

Any other Q's just ask!


PH

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2019, 01:37:51 PM »
Looking good, if I ever need an expedition style bike, I think that has all the boxes ticked.  I like the idea of being able to run a derailleur if needed, though the chances of needing to are rare.  Not so sure about the movable V brake mounts, not for any practical reason I just dislike the clutter of unused fittings.  The Imron paint on my Mercury has proved itself to be the best finish on any steel frame I've had, good looking and tough, usually the choice is one or the other. 
I know someone using an original derailleur Nomad from around twenty years ago, I see them on it every week and though not many components are original, it's still going strong.

lestat_12345

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2019, 01:42:44 PM »
Does anyone know when the Nomad MK3 will be available for sale? I would just be interested in buying the frame and fork as I already have a Nomad MK2 from which I would transfer all the components. I am also interested in finding out what the estimated retails cost of such items would be.

Dave Whittle Thorn Workshop

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2019, 03:54:30 PM »
Quote
Does anyone know when the Nomad MK3 will be available for sale? I would just be interested in buying the frame and fork as I already have a Nomad MK2 from which I would transfer all the components. I am also interested in finding out what the estimated retails cost of such items would be.

Will show on the website in about a week, we have them physically here now though if you wanted to call sales and discuss 01278 441505

Danneaux

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2019, 03:29:26 AM »
More photos are attached below for those who can't see them on Instagram.
Quote
I wonder if they still put the brakes on the back side of the fork?  I found several reasons to be frustrated with that, I would have preferred that they built the fork like everyone else with the brakes on the front.
It appears you got your wish, George, as the brake bosses are now on the front of the v-brake fork and the crown appears to be very like one used previously on the Sherpa.

Most intriguing of all is the news the Nomad Mk3 is now belt-drive capable(!).

To summarize from the Instagram photos:

Belt-drive option via a split in the right seatstay above the dropout-spanning brace. The seatstay split looks like an overlapping slug closed by two opposing allenhead socket screws in two threaded wells.
3 new Imron paint options and a new logotype; frame tubes ED coated inside to prevent corrosion, vent holes can be filled.
New right dropout that is derailleur capable with a bolt-on adapter in place of the blanking plate.
New downtube and right chainstay cable guides.
No longer suspension-capable/no sus-fork option.
Extended head tube which will likely result in fewer spacers.
New disc fork that is Boost compatible for use with through-axles (keeping the standard q/r for the Rohloff in the interest of reliability) and a wider bi-plate crown; Accommodates tires up to 2.35" or 650b tyres up to 60b.
New v-brake fork fork with reversible mounts to accept 26in or 650b wheel sizes. Rearframe also has reversible/removable v-brake mounts to do the same. Threaded brake adapter holes can be plugged with allen bolts.

Related items:
Thorn Dropout Kickstand Adapter: https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gear-spares/thorn-dropout-adaptor-with-kickstand-mount-18-mm/?geoc=US
...for use with OEM Pletscher ESGE KS18 Comp 18 Flex Stand: https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/oem-stock-bike-build-only/oem-thorn-esge-ks18-stand-blacktitan/?geoc=US
  Thorn Steering Lock Limiter & Striker for 37 mm Head Tubes & 1 1/8 Inch Steerers: https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/frames/thorn-steering-lock-limiter-striker-for-37-mm-head-tubes-1-18-inch-steerers/?geoc=US

[Credit for all photos and text, @ThornCycles Instagram account]

Best,

Dan.


Danneaux

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2019, 03:30:29 AM »
...and more photos and text descriptions...

Best,

Dan.

Danneaux

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2019, 03:33:08 AM »
Announcement of belt-drive option... (red arrow).

Best,

Dan.

Tiberius

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2019, 06:12:22 AM »
Well that ticks a lot of boxes for me.

Versatile dropouts, disc brakes, belt drive compatible, kick stand and I even like the colour.

Hmmmm, is it 'Goodbye' to my Surly Troll ??

mickeg

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2019, 12:37:39 PM »
I did not see in the photos how to put on a belt, but I would prefer chain anyway, I can wait for a better photo on that.

The only other box that is not checked is the three bolt holes in a row for a Salsa Anything cage on each fork blade.

I am surprised that a Tubus rear rack is being installed in one of the photos instead of a Thorn rack.  But what surprises me the most is that it is not a Logo.  I like the way the Logo mounts the center of gravity of the load lower on the bike.

...It appears you got your wish, George, as the brake bosses are now on the front of the v-brake fork and the crown appears to be very like one used previously on the Sherpa.
...

Yeah, I had considered buying a Tubus Smarti rack for my Nomad when the Tubus Tara did not fit very well, the horizontal bar was far from horizontal on the Tara.  I also like to hang my panniers a few inches higher than standard low rider racks for when I am off road.  Then I realized that the Smarti would likely not work out so well with the brake bosses in the wrong place.

I have a small little rack on my Sherpa mounted on the canti brake bosses, that won't work either.

Initially I planned to run canti brakes, but there is no way to put on a cable hanger.  I did have canti brakes on the rear for a while, but later changed to V brakes when I found that Tektro made a brake that had a long enough arm (110mm) to clear the fender over my 57mm wide tire.

And fitting the fork into the S&S case would be easier if the brake bosses were on the same side of the curve of the fork blades.

Soon after I built up the Nomad it seemed almost every month I was coming up with one more reason why the brakes on the back were even more frustrating.

But now that CSS rims are no more, I would be more inclined to consider a disc for one wheel. 

I built up my Lynskey with a disc on rear and rim brake on front, having one disc brake for rainy days would be nice.  My heavily loaded Nomad with rim brakes front and rear was hard to stop one day in Iceland when a bus passed me and the bus driver then realized he was passing the road he wanted to turn on to, so he hit the brakes very hard, which meant I had to hit my brakes very hard too.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2019, 12:40:31 PM by mickeg »

brummie

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2019, 08:50:19 PM »
Think I'm gonna need a larger shed..
 

Dave Whittle Thorn Workshop

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2019, 09:17:24 AM »
Quote
But what surprises me the most is that it is not a Logo.  I like the way the Logo mounts the center of gravity of the load lower on the bike.

I've ridden a bike with a Vega then the same bike with a Logo with 25kg of panniers, the logo lowers the bags but also puts them further back often moving the centre of gravity behind the rear wheel and turning the bike into a wheelie machine up hills.

il padrone

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2019, 02:31:44 PM »
Eight years on and my Thorn Nomad Mk2 is still running the Pletscher Multizoom clamp-on kickstand and very happy with it too..... despite Thorn telling me that it would void any warranty if I used a kickstand  ::)

mickeg

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Re: Thorn announce Nomad Mk 3
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2019, 04:36:19 PM »
Eight years on and my Thorn Nomad Mk2 is still running the Pletscher Multizoom clamp-on kickstand and very happy with it too..... despite Thorn telling me that it would void any warranty if I used a kickstand  ::)

Only six years for me, I built up my Mk II in 2013.  And I was not aware of the warranty issue until after I had installed my Greenfield stand.  In the up position in the second photo.

A friend of mine broke a Greenfield like mine while on a tour with his Cannondale touring bike.  But he can be pretty hard on equipment, I only use my stand where the bike feels pretty stable and does not lean too far over which would put more stress on the kickstand.