Author Topic: Should I replace Chain.  (Read 577 times)

Andre Jute

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Re: Should I replace Chain.
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2018, 05:59:45 AM »
I my experience using a chainglider is the most cost effective solution on a Rohloff geared bike.
It will keep your chain, sprocket and chainwheel in good condition for a very long time.

Not to mention that you can forego all that bending over the bike after every ride to clean the power chain, which to some of us is no longer a choice. Besides the Chainglider, the n'lock is another life-saving (in my case literally) convenience that save you bending even as far as the top of the rear wheel to close a ringlock or bit further to fit a D-lock. I'd go further and call them "the components that saved cycling".

I'll soon be presenting my Chainglider experience.

I'm looking forward to that, Matt. Save Dan's goodwill and make a new thread because you can bet that one will run and run, and many lurkers will be referring back to it for years.

Matt2matt2002

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Re: Should I replace Chain.
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2018, 01:28:43 PM »
Thanks Andre
I sure will start a new thread.
At the moment I'm packing for my Morocco trip on Monday - so will prepare data on return at end of August.
I took a quick look at the stats and have used the Chainglider for 3 years and 9 months, covering 11,000 miles.

Any advice for the kind of relevant info I should include?
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

Andre Jute

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Re: Should I replace Chain.
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2018, 10:09:30 PM »
Any advice for the kind of relevant info I should include?

I once worked with a film director who would answer any question about what he wanted with, "Don't deny me any riches," meaning he wanted each possibility scripted, which made an enormous amount of unnecessary work. I hated him and twice since refused to work with him.

I were you, I'd start by compiling a list of references to previous discussions on the board, including those on other subjects containing references to the Chainglider, as a sort of reference zentral and to avoid writing tedious iteration of material already covered, such as choosing the correct Chainglider components, or distinguishing between the series, all of which and much more already stands on the board. Also make a reference to Chaingliders that don't exist yet but would are wanted by a group of Rohloff riders, the 36-tooth chainring brigade; do this at the end of your brief section on matching Chainglider components to each other and to the transmission on the bike.

In the main section of your report we want to know why you took the decision to install a Chainglider, because your intention and expectation determines your assessment of the outcome. Follow that with a very brief description of each of your tours -- with URL references to longer descriptions elsewhere on the board, so we can understand the challenges you put to the Chainglider. Then its performance. Your stats will come in handy here; cyclists adore stats, especially the ones they understand. Finally, a succinct personal assessment, often seen in the form "why you would recommend it (or not) to a friend".

Don't do as I do and write descriptions; where you have a photograph, use it, and make your point in the caption; some of my most popular bicycle articles aren't articles at all but photo-essays with minimal text clarifications.

Enjoy your tour!

Brush2805

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Re: Should I replace Chain.
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2018, 09:15:20 PM »
Thanks for your thoughts on this issue. I will ignore my Thorn manual and fit a new chain, it doesn't seem very logical to remove a link in the chain, refit and trash the sprocket and ring. I should probably pay more attention to my chain wear and change before I get to this point in future. I have another question, for clarity will post a new thread.

macspud

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Re: Should I replace Chain.
« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2018, 01:52:22 AM »
Thorn say that a link can be removed because with some setups the new chain will initially need to be fitted  with most of the adjustment already used, in which case to get a full life out of the chain it must be shortened and the EBB turned back. This happens when chainstay length, cog size and  chainring size conspire to make it impossible to start a new chain at the start of the adjustment of the  EBB.
That is why it is good to measure the stretch to find out whether the chain is still within parameters or not, in your case not. You will find out where the EBB starting point is when you fit a new chain. Sounds like on your bike you're getting to use the full scope of the EBB without having to remove a link. With a different choice of sprocket and chainring that may not have been the case.