Author Topic: Anti corrosion ?  (Read 238 times)

Tokumeino

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Anti corrosion ?
« on: May 04, 2018, 05:22:58 PM »
Hi, not sure whether this matters a lot or not but websites such as All City's advertise anti-corrosion treatment :

Quote
In Electrophoretic Deposition, or E.D., coating the frame or fork is placed in a paint bath where an electric charge is applied. This fuses a thin layer of black satin coating to the tubes inside and out. This coating acts as both a rust preventative inside and a primer out.

I think that Soma frames also start to include such a coating.

Is there such a thing with Thorn frames ?

David Simpson

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Re: Anti corrosion ?
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2018, 05:26:07 PM »
I believe the workshop prep includes the coating.

https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/frames/frame-workshop-prep

Edit: This is a spray-in coating. You may be referring to some electrolysis coating?

- DaveS

mickeg

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Re: Anti corrosion ?
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2018, 11:41:55 PM »
I bought my Sherpa frame used.  The previous owner told me that he applied Frame Saver to it.

I bought my Nomad new, I put Frame Saver in all the tubes that I could.

I do not know if you can buy it in France, this is what I used.
https://velo-orange.com/products/weigle-frame-saver

There may be other products like it.  I have also heard of people putting linseed oil in frames to coat the inner tubing.

I do not know if it really did anything, but I felt better that I had done something to help reduce corrosion from occurring.

Andre Jute

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Re: Anti corrosion ?
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2018, 07:37:38 AM »
I have also heard of people putting linseed oil in frames to coat the inner tubing.

Linseed is a drying oil, a very hardy painter's medium, 100 years plus of protection. Natural volatile elements evaporate and would leave a thin, very even wax-like layer inside the tubes. Can't do any harm. To my mind superior to cheap wax of unknown origin and composition mixed with petroleum derivatives, which is what most 'frame protestors' are. Walnut oil, available at the supermarket, is also a good choice for the same reasons as linseed oil.

mickeg

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Re: Anti corrosion ?
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2018, 11:45:21 AM »
If you have never used linseed oil before, if you have any linseed oil soaked rags when you are done, they can spontaneously combust.  Google it for more info.  Be safe.

Andre Jute

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Re: Anti corrosion ?
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2018, 11:52:35 PM »
Thanks, George. I was tapping away on a tablet, so my message perforce had to be short.

Yes, don't keep around rags used to mop up spilled linseed oil, especially if they're cotton, unless you have facilities for keeping them under water, which is what oil painters do. They can combust spontaneously in the presence of oxygen, that is, air.

However, sprayed- or painted-on linseed oil is safe enough not to be considered a hazard even by the nanny-state EU, and I don't know of a single fire starting on a painter's canvas in half a millennium. After the linseed oil has dried the residual layer is perfectly safe. Drying is a slow process that goes on for years but the residual layer after the volatile components have evaporated generally feels touch dry within a handful of days and oil painter practice is to varnish over linseed-mixed pigments from six months upward, when an oil painting is "presumed dry".