Author Topic: Advice for handlebars  (Read 205 times)

Tokumeino

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Advice for handlebars
« on: May 04, 2018, 03:27:27 PM »
After http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=12815.0, an new thread about handlebars. I know that there won't be a single definitive answer to a question such as "Which handlebar is the best ?". Nevertheless, accurate requirements could narrow the obvious choices.

So... I'm still not decided whether I'l buy a Club Tour or a Sherpa. In either case, it would be lightly build, yet with a fork providing eylets for luggage. My most important usage is basically :
  • 15km (one way) daily commute
  • 1/3 in a high density city with usually heavy traffic
  • groceries once a week on average
My regular position in traffic is "FAIRLY RELAXED" as on the Thorn Brochure. I cannot be too straight because of back ache and so I'd prefer a not-rising handlebar.

Dropbars are nice in heavy traffic because they are narrow. But braking is not that much convenient, especially in case of an emergency, in the upper position. There are inline additional levers but yet, even if it is quite irrational, I've never felt comfortable with dropbars. Besides, aiming at a 1x11 transmission, even in Apex, with the DoubleTap thing, it is very expensive IMO. So I'm looking for something else, with regular levers and cheaper quickshifts.

When I let my arms drop, hands naturally perpendicular to my chest, I can measure 45cm between hands. It's quite like the max distance between my shoulder bones (then there is flesh arround). Yet, with 45cm, why to most handlebars are more than 56cm wide ? In traffic, when between a car and a bus, 5cm on each side is a lot ;)

I'm looking for something which is not flat (because the hands would not be in a comfortable position). I don't think that 5 is enough. But I'd like the dropbar to be narrower than 55m. And I'd prefer bars with zero rise Any Idea ?

When looking for alternative handlebars, I very quickly come to things like Modolo Yuma, Nitto North Road, but everything seems very wide to me. What do you think ?
« Last Edit: May 04, 2018, 03:39:41 PM by Tokumeino »

mickeg

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Re: Advice for handlebars
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2018, 04:41:54 PM »
Responding to your comment on the other thread, I also like those brake levers.  Photos of several of my bikes with those brake levers below.




Danneaux

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Re: Advice for handlebars
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2018, 05:46:34 PM »
I too have cross-top/interrupter levers fitted to the drop handlebars on my Nomad, but find I only really use them as a way to get my weight down and rearward when descending really steep downslopes on goat tracks. I fitted them for that purpose and they work brilliantly for me in that application. Otherwise, I find the regular levers give me excellent braking ("stoppies" are possible when riding unladen) from atop the hoods or on the drops and have not fitted them to my other bikes.

Best,

Dan.

energyman

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Re: Advice for handlebars
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2018, 05:55:34 PM »
I like the way the bar bag is fitted, never thought of using an adjustable stem  for that.

mickeg

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Re: Advice for handlebars
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2018, 11:25:17 PM »
I like the way the bar bag is fitted, never thought of using an adjustable stem  for that.

I had the adjustable stem and wanted to use a second stem for the bar bag bracket when I built up the bike, so it only seemed natural to give it a try.  And with that being adjustable, I could lower the bag and mount it closer to the steerer tube steering axis to reduce impact on handling.  You can see from the other photos that I usually use a second stem, but used the 55mm Thorn Accessory T Bar for my Nomad.