Author Topic: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?  (Read 1194 times)

PH

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2018, 01:57:04 PM »
My Mercury isn't the lightest build, I could shave maybe 1.5 kg off it, lighter tyres and tubes (Which I'll probably do for the summer anyway) change the rack, maybe a different saddle, swap the Carradice saddlebag...
OK - the madness has started, evidenced by me quoting and talking to myself...
Invested some of the sale proceeds from the SOMA into the Mercury, sold the SS rack and bought a S/H titanium one, swapped the cheap inner tubes for some lightweight ones (Also now carrying lightweights as spares) swapped the front tyre from 35mm to 32 (Needed changing anyway) 80 spent for just under 465g off the bike, just over half a kg including the carried tubes, that's probably the best G per I'm going to get. Kept the front wheel off the SOMA so when I don't need the dynamo there's another 320g to be saved. Also under consideration a multi tool to replace those tools carried and I'm still pondering the rear rim, that'll probably be it for the bike, anything further either compromises the durability beyond my level of acceptance or costs a lot of s for just a few Gs.
Looking at luggage next, probably make my own without too much regard for longevity.  Then the camping kit, big saving there could be the tent, but I like the space my 2.2 kg one gives...
Aim is for bike and kit to come under 22kg and a few kg off the rider to make it a nice round 100kg.

Constructive suggestions always welcome.  The discussion on how much difference it makes can be left for another time... 

« Last Edit: June 09, 2018, 01:59:40 PM by PH »

John Saxby

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2018, 05:43:19 PM »
Paul, a few thoughts:

   > multi-tool: I've found that most multi-tools are relatively heavy. But:  Filzer make a very tidy, light & compact kit with a ratcheting handle and 6 or 8 insert bits.  You can set aside the not-v-heavy rigid plastic case -- I use a Ziploc bag. Gerber also have a well-made light & compact multi-unit, with pliers, knife, etc.

   > tubes:  I've found that Schwalbe's XXL are light (~95 gms) and very good quality.

   > tires:  You may not need any just now, and we're in trade-off territory in any case.  The fastest & lightest I've ever used are Compass tires.  Mine are the 26 x 1.8 Naches Pass with standard casings. (There is an extra-light).  I've found them fast-but-fragile.  Maybe they'd suit for your Audaxes, but you might lose on the tube-changing swings whatever you gain on being quickly over the road.

   > camping gear:  More trade-offs here, as you probably already know, and personal preferences too. (As the saying goes, "Cheap, light, durable. Pick any two.")  New-generation gear and clothing can be light, durable, and of course pricey.  It's also less bulky, and that's also desirable on a bike.  On tents:  The best combination of weight-space-ventilation-compactness-quality which I've found is my current Tarptent Moment DW.  It's also reasonably priced, at around US$300. I bought the optional nose-to-tail crossing pole, and have found it invaluable, at the cost of another 6 or 8 ounces. (This converts the tent to sorta-free-standing, and ensures that the fly doesn't sag against the mesh inner.)  Doing it all again, I might buy the two optional carbon poles, instead of the standard alu -- sometimes, I find that the alu hoop pole in the centre, the main structural part of the tent, binds on the fabric channel into which you insert it to pitch the tent.  Another detail point on tents:  as a rule, the length of the bundle when wrapped depends on the length of the segments in the poles.  That determines whether you must mount the tent on a rack, or whether you can tuck poles and fabric separately or together into your panniers or a frame bag. 

   >  sleeping bag, mattress, etc. One variable is: how much rain do you expect?  In damp conditions, a sleeping bag with the new variety of synthetic fill might be my choice over down. You do have a slightly heavier bag as a result, but the new synthetic fills are much lighter than the older ones.

   >  luggage:  Given the notes above, and that you have a light ti rack, I'd suggest  Arkel Dry-Lites (or similar) as rear panniers, and frame bags elsewhere.  On handlebar bags:  There's an outfit in Massachusetts, Dill Pickle Gear, which makes a lovely bar bag, but I'd have to pay at least Cdn$300 just to save a pound. Here's the link, just in case: http://www.dillpicklegear.com/store/  (I think I'll opt for a Ground Effect rain jacket instead--same cost/weight calculation.)

Hope that's helpful, Paul, and enjoy the continuing arithmetic ;)

Cheers,  John

Danneaux

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2018, 06:20:53 PM »
Quote
Constructive suggestions always welcome.  The discussion on how much difference it makes can be left for another time... 
Hi Paul!

I've found a lightweight kit I put together and described here works nicely for overnighters between my longer day rides with minimum weight and bulk:
http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=11787.msg85858#msg85858

Tent shown in this link is a Terra Nova Laser Competition 1...one of numerous variants on the original Hilleberg Akto 1 design:
https://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/all-tents/laser-competition-1-tent-ss16/

Total weight including the bag itself is 6.41kg/14.1lb complete except for food, which is variable. Main weight savings comes from the single-bag approach (replacing panniers and racks) and the fairly lightweight sleeping and cooking kits. Tools are minimal (mostly a good bike-specific multitool with a spare tube and two instant and solvent-type patch kits with a mini-pump) because the bike is well proven and in good shape. Little things help save weight and bulk at minimal cost to convenience -- instead of of my larger Swiss Army knives, I take a tiny SAK Classic with a P-38 can opener on the key ring, sufficient for most needs during the intended timeframe for use. Toiletries are a small rock-type deodorant crystal, a spare contact lens and drops bottle and my travel toothbrush and travel-size toothpaste, several adhesive bandages and a small tube of antibiotic ointment. Cooking gear: Stove is a beer-can penny stove with a nesting cup set with lid, stand, windscreen and mini-lighter. That's it. A real contrast to my expedition packing list and everything in between.

Of course, everyone has their preferences for a specific use and trip -- this scheme certainly does not fit all my own needs -- but it is yet another way and something in it might prove helpful to you.

Best,

Dan.

DAntrim

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2018, 11:06:14 PM »
Hi Paul

For a lightweight tent I use the Mini Peak II with tarp pole and a groundsheet comes in at 1900gm, the internal space can fit the bike, equipment and myself if needed - link below.

http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelters-1/WF126-139.html

Carlos

aggs

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2018, 10:44:20 AM »
Using a Terra Nova Laser here, 1kg and good for one person, was very tempted by an a secondhand  Hilliberg  but in reality the Terra Nova is pretty good for the amount I use it and used the money saved I recently bought a secondhand  down sleeping bag of ebay . ( was actually brand new!)  which saves a lot of weight, although Hilliberg are better made and vent better inside, we use a 3 man one for car camping and I have a another Terra Nova 2 man ( another ebay bargain! ) for cycle  camping with the Mrs.
The old Karrimor paniers are really light (but not waterproof) one of mine has probably done over well 20,000 commuting (mainly) and camping miles, and being packed today for another camping trip, bought circa 2001, certainly had my moneys worth!
I find shoes the biggest hassle, as it nice to have proper shoes to walk in for eves. but lightweight , comfortable and not too bulky and waterproof! shoes are hard to find that meet all criteria! .  Last trip just wore my cycling shoes with spds  and polythene bags incase the grass was wet in the campsite!!

I have also got more confident in using battery lights , which saves weight on using the dynamo hub etc, as the run times are pretty good now , but the old habit of having a hub and lights at all times is hard to break!

Refining the camping kit is an art, a challenge and probably the place where the biggest savings can be made and could be debated forever!!  Some great kit comes up on ebay , but need to be patient and wait. Its amazing how people buy stuff, do not use it much then sell it!   Most lightweight kit is v. expensive.

Tend to use bike packing bags when travelling on my own and panniers for more touring type trips with the Mrs, and I tend to carry nearly everything so use the odd bikepacking bag too as well as the panniers.   Sounds like you are investing the frameset money wisely. Happy Cycling


« Last Edit: June 10, 2018, 10:54:45 AM by aggs »

PH

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #20 on: June 10, 2018, 08:17:16 PM »
Thanks folks, plenty of food for thought there.  I'm mulling over it, I'm immediately impressed by Dan's 6.41kg!
I'd love to try compass tyres, it's just the expense, I use the same bike to go to work Mon - Fri and can't see me either swapping tyres for the weekend or getting the benefit from them in the week...
My tent is TN Solar 2.2, I love it, it suites me perfectly, I just wish it wasn't over 2kg. I like TN, not least because the HQ is just up the road from me. I've spent a couple of night in a laser, it's not for me, couple of reasons but the deciding factor was I just don't like the canvas that close to me face (The Solar has near vertical ends) for the same reason I'm not considering the Mini Peak.  A lighter tent is going to be a compromise, if I ever make that choice and there's no certainty I will, it's be for a substantial weight saving, not just a few grams, something no more than half it's weight.
I sleep very comfortable, using a down quilt (830g) the mat is an Exped Synmat UL. though it's on it's way out with faulty baffles, my third such mat to go this way.  I'm open to suggestions for anything lighter than it's 600g, though I'd want reasonable insulation. 
The rest is clothing and bits and pieces, I think the biggest weight saving would be the discipline to leave some of t at home!
I may reply to some more of the points made when I've had chance to look at some of the ideas, please keep them coming.

jags

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #21 on: June 10, 2018, 11:15:49 PM »
do you use the toggle bag to inflate the synmatt ,i never had a problem with mine not that it was used to often  ::)

PH

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2018, 08:15:01 AM »
do you use the toggle bag to inflate the synmatt ,i never had a problem with mine not that it was used to often  ::)
I use the schnozzel pump that came with it, is that the one you mean?
https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/sleeping-mats-c58/mat-accessories-c60/schnozzel-pumpbag-ul-p9415

I've had about 80 nights on this one, it is a very comfortable mat, easy to inflate and warm.  The baffles delaminating is a well known issue with this sort of mat, not just Exped, the first of my three was a Big Agnes.  It's time to try something else.

aggs

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #23 on: June 11, 2018, 09:43:55 AM »
Had baffle go on my Exped, they have a 2 year guarantee and I got it replaced no questions asked.
Brand new for tomorrows trip so hope its going to be ok.
, although not such an issue in summer conditions   Must move a bit gentler on it this time, maybe they are not made well enough?

Quilts are great for summer camping , although I made a "mistake" by getting a double one, I bought it when we hired some really light sleeping bags for a trip to France, and had the quilt as a backup on colder nights.
In hindsight I wish I got single ones , but they are good and event the double one packs small and is light at 700g, but never gone quilt only yet!! 



PH

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Re: Anyone riding Audax on a Mercury?
« Reply #24 on: June 11, 2018, 09:56:01 AM »
Had baffle go on my Exped, they have a 2 year guarantee and I got it replaced no questions asked.
Brand new for tomorrows trip so hope its going to be ok.
, although not such an issue in summer conditions   Must move a bit gentler on it this time, maybe they are not made well enough?
My current one is a warranty replacement, though it's now well over two years old.  There is a problem with the design that there's no way around (I used to work with the type of HF welding techniques used, though on completely different products) it doesn't mean every one will fail, but it's no surprise to me when they do.
I've been using the quilt for around ten years, I never did find a sleeping bag I slept comfortably in, the quilt has been great.  It's big enough and designed so that it can be made into a rectangular sleeping bag (Which I haven't done) or just draw the foot end into a box (Which I do in cold weather).