Author Topic: Rohloff Cable Protection  (Read 557 times)

Templogin

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Re: Rohloff Cable Protection
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2018, 11:28:27 AM »
Thanks, Dan, Martin and Andre.  There is some very useful information in there.  I will add it to the notes I am keeping so far, in the section Words of Wisdom!

Thanks again

Andy

PH

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Re: Rohloff Cable Protection
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2018, 03:08:55 PM »
Andy,
Based on my own experience with the same cable routing, I don't think the exposed portion of the cable runs on your wife's bike will pose any problems.
I had the same cable routing for more than a decade and it was never a problem, the cables won't attract much dirt, assuming you're using mudguards.  A tip to make disconnecting the cables easier when removing the wheel is to replace one of the grub screws in both the male and female sections of each connector with a cap head screw.  This makes no difference to the connection but makes it a lot easier to get hold of and disconnect, particularly on the roadside, in the freezing rain...
I have since had my hub converted to external shifting (In order to use a disc brake) and have to say I preferred the internal in all respects other than wheel removal.

Templogin

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Re: Rohloff Cable Protection
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2018, 04:54:51 PM »
Thanks PH.  More useful infon in there, which I will add to my notes.

Andy

martinf

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Re: Rohloff Cable Protection
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2018, 08:40:05 PM »
I imagine that on most bikes the Chainglider "arms" will need to be shortened. Finding a bike on which either factory length of Chainglider fits out of the box would be mainly a matter of luck.

I was lucky on my first 3 Chainglider installations - 2 large Thorn Raven Tour frames and an old 650B frame with reasonably generous clearances.

No shortening of the Chainglider needed, but I did need to remove the red button on the rear part of the Chainglider on the 650B frame to prevent the Chainglider from rubbing on the seatstay.

4th and 5th installations needed shortening. Both these bikes were small "ladies" frames - the Raven 390 step through that I am currently building, and an old 700C twin-lateral frame with fairly close clearances for 28 mm tyres.


lewisjnoble

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Re: Rohloff Cable Protection
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2018, 12:25:56 PM »
Sent you a p m . . . .

Lewis
 

Danneaux

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Re: Rohloff Cable Protection
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2018, 10:24:45 PM »
Back to the OP's second question...
Quote
the cables to the Rohloff travel along the top tube, then when they travel along the chain stays they are partially exposed.  Partially exposed brake cables were one of the things that caused problems on the Dawes.  If you have covered the exposed cables, what did you use as a solution?
Andy Blance addresses the matter of cable protection with Rohloff internal gearboxes in the latest Thorn Mega brochure on page 18 [emphasis mine]: http://www.sjscycles.com/thornpdf/thorn_mega_brochure.pdf
Quote
Above and Left, the original and still current, Rohloff Hub, with internal gear cables. We fit this to our Ravens. The Rohloff-specific gear wire, which runs from the quick release bayonet fittings, to the hub is 0.9mm stainless steel and is sealed from the elements by concertina tubes.  The cables above the bayonet fitting, are conventional 1.1mm stainless steel gear wires, which run in brake outer above the adjusters.  Between the bayonet and the adjusters, the gear wires are unprotected from the elements, water runs downhill, which is why the perfect cable routing for this hub runs under the top tube.

All the best,

Dan.