Author Topic: Notes from a short tour of the extended neighbourhood of East & Central Ontario  (Read 183 times)

John Saxby

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Well, "notes" is a bit generous.  Last week I finished my ride from Ottawa to Toronto and back, and the usual mountain of Domestic Admin--plumbing repairs, tree trimming--awaiting me has shoved the story to the side of the table for the moment.  Below are a few photos, mostly of water and sky 'cos that's the prevailing scenery.

My outward route went N and W of Ottawa through the highlands of Madawaska, Hastings, and Haliburton, to Orillia (west of Lake Couchiching) to Barrie, at the western end of the the long arm on the west side of Lake Simcoe, due N of Toronto. I took the commuter train into Toronto, to avoid the northern 'burbs. After a few days in TO, I took the commuter train eastwards out of the city to Oshawa. In Oshawa, I picked up the Waterfront Trail which runs between Niagara Falls and Montrιal, along the N shore of Lake Ontario and then the St Lawrence River.

I had 10 days of riding in all, a distance of about 900 kms.  Only one morning of grotty weather--the very first day, Sept. 4, was cool, damp-wet-rainy. After that, the five days of my outward (westward) journey were sunny, and cool with stiff headwinds; and the four days on my return leg were sunny and warm with slight tailwinds.

More to come on the route and the stories.

jags

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Class ,well done John super photos.

anto.

energyman

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Magic - thanks.

Thomas777

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Glad you got out for a short tour!!
Tom

Andre Jute

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"Early morning mist over Bay of Quinte from Adolphustown campsite, Sept 14.jpg" is so evocative.

John Saxby

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Thanks, Andre.  That's my favourite.  I was stumbling around, watching the tea water, etc., etc., then looked at the lake and said, Oh jeez, gotta get the camera!"  Sometimes you're just lucky.

This park, BTW, was the landing point of loyalist refugees coming to Upper Canada (as it would become in 1791) after The Great Unpleasantness between 1776 and 1783, just across the St Lawrence. A hundred years later, in 1884, a monument was erected to mark their landing.  These were European refugees: just west of here is Mohawk territory, sans monument.  The settlement of Adolphustown was founded by Quakers of German descent from Pennsylvania, who migrated in the mid-18th century.

It's a beautiful spot, and the fee per site for cyclists is just $13. The tenting area was an orchard until just recently, so I gathered a few apples for dessert.  They were lovely.

Andre Jute

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    • Andre Jute
Don't believe anyone who tells you spring and summer are the best seasons in Ireland. It's definitely autumn. Today was 18 degrees Celsius, with a light wind and intermittent sunshine, ideal cycling weather. Rode a circle from home into the countryside, back into town at another point, and thence home. Out for two hours which is just right when you have things to do.

Funny you should mention apples and history, John. My pedalpal brought apples, presumably from his own orchard (I didn't ask -- he's an organic nut), and for a break we stood on a bridge and tried to guess if Robert Boyle's* land grand extended up the river, as a side issue to a discussion of whether there had been a tow path beside the river when the clock and bell in the tower of the church at Newcestown were barged up the River Bandon. (We heard about that from the barkeep in Newcestown, together with other fascinating history, on another ride.) I wouldn't eat the apples from my own orchard, because they're likely to have fallen in my foxes' and hedgehogs' lavatory...

*Yes, the Boyle of Boyle's Law. Besides being a scientist of note, he was also an aristocrat and major royal land grantee.

David Simpson

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My pedalpal brought apples, presumably from his own orchard (I didn't ask -- he's an organic nut),
...
I wouldn't eat the apples from my own orchard, because they're likely to have fallen in my foxes' and hedgehogs' lavatory...

Andre, that would make your apples even more organic than your friend's apples.

- DaveS

Andre Jute

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[Laughing aloud]

Andre Jute

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From my blog:
A year or three ago John Saxon, a chum from the Thorn cycling forum, published a photo of the backyard of his friends from just over the mountain where I was born, the mountain separating the two towns strikingly prominent in his photo. I promised to paint the scene but, when eventually I finished the painting, it was wretched, not fit for consumption by man or beast. If you think I'm joking, even my cat sneered at it. I've earned my living in the arts for too long to be sensitive to the vagaries of critics and, having been a critic myself, am only too familiar with the constant struggle to keep criticism pure from contamination by external considerations. But my cat keeps my knees warm in the winter, which no critic has yet offered to do, so I pay close attention to her opinion. Between my cat and I we buried that painting.

All the same, not wanting to offer John an explanation that starts, "My cat and I..." in the tones of Her Majesty's Yule tidings from herself and her Corgis, I was glad when he published another inspiring photograph, albeit from another hemisphere and a different continent.

John's first photo and my discarded painting are of the Karroo at Prince Albert in South Africa, the Karroo being a semi-desert area though John's friends live in a charming green spot on a river. John's second photograph is of the Bay of Quinte in Ontario, Canada, an entirely different milieu. Not that either painting is representational, because I can't be bothered with those when a superior camera fits in your shirt pocket and adds only a few grammes to your cycling paraphernalia.

As you can see, it's the inspiration that counts, with the two images serendipitously influencing the final outcome.

Andre Jute: Early morning mist over Bay of Quinte, watercolour and gouache on grey Ingres paper, A4, 2017

There's more about this painting on my blog.

John Saxby

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Super stuff, Andre! I'm flattered that you've used both of those photos.

As for your cat's opinion: don't take it personally. You know the joke, eh?- "Dogs have owners; cats have staff."

I've yet to finish my notes & photos from this tour--just too much Stuff Going On--but I have the rough notes and the photos are edited, so I just need a few hours to assemble the lot.

Had a superb ride up into the Gatineau hills today--21°, sunny and breezy--and I have a few photos with splashes of Proper Foliage, along with some landscapes which look like The Holy Ground (in my imagination at least.)  Will post those tomorrow on your "Rides of 2017" thread.

Cheers,  John