Author Topic: Tim James Davies  (Read 235 times)

Matt2matt2002

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Tim James Davies
« on: August 22, 2017, 09:41:59 PM »
Interesting clip for those of us who like the idea of long tours
https://vimeo.com/56736424
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Danneaux

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2017, 06:49:55 AM »
Re: Tim's expressed philosophy: I'm often astonished at how it seems I have everything I could possibly want or need with me on tour. It is hard to conceive of any real need for all the things left waiting at home...or, indeed, a home.

Anyone else feel the same on tours short or long?

Best,

Dan.

in4

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2017, 10:41:06 AM »
I had a brief look at that video too. A man who seems to have found great contentment on a bicycle. A few worldly goods and fuel for the legs, simple but priceless.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 11:56:43 AM by in4 »

jags

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2017, 12:39:25 PM »
yeah very good but he obviously has fantastic health  single  and enough money to keep him doing exactly wants to do.
life is not that simple .

jags.

j-ms

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2017, 02:17:07 PM »
Quote
Re: Tim's expressed philosophy: I'm often astonished at how it seems I have everything I could possibly want or need with me on tour. It is hard to conceive of any real need for all the things left waiting at home...or, indeed, a home.

I can relate to this 100%.

In a week's time it will be eighteen months since we sold our house, gave away most of our material possessions and started living the lives of permanent nomads.  I can't think of anything that I need that I am not carrying on my bicycle.  Back home (?) in South Africa we have an eleven year old Land Rover Defender and an off-road camper in storage.  There is hardly a day that goes by that I wonder what use we have for them.

We are fortunate that we have a small business that can travel with us.  The internet has made the world a smaller place and our tiny Mom 'n Pop software business does not need a brick and mortar office.  Not everyone is fortunate enough to able to work and travel at the same time as we do.  Indeed many people wouldn't want to. 

The only thing that ties us to "home" is our close family.  Skype and WhatsApp make it very easy to stay in touch and to maintain relationships (or develop them in the case of the grandchildren) but we know that occasional physical contact is also important.  We fly back to South Africa in November to be with the family but we are already planning where we will go to next.

You don't have to be single or have a lot of money.  Our daily costs are less living on our bicycles than they were living in a house and I have the most fantastic wife who enjoys living this life as much as I do.

« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 02:19:41 PM by j-ms »

jags

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2017, 03:02:32 PM »
Im truly glad for you it sounds like a fantastic lifestyle .but for me I have nothing left to sell im happy enough with my own life except of course me aches and pains.but yeah love to have the balls to tackle what you guys do.stay safe .

StuntPilot

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2017, 05:19:43 PM »
Great to see this guy enjoying himself. Perhaps as humans we are naturally a nomadic bunch. Its only recently in human history after all that we have settled in one spot and have grown our own food.

Maybe through cycle touring we awaken some deep almost genetic satisfaction from that movement and simplicity of life. New sights, sounds and places, and the human need for human interaction satisfied. Yes, it costs money to tour but less and less with experience and the shedding of modern 'cravings'.

As for doing without a house, a home, maybe not. Having a 'Summer pasture' and a 'Wintering ground' is perhaps a better compromise (whatever that may be). I think that humans need a ‘base’ to return to that they identify with as ‘home’. The nomadic peoples who still exist in some parts of the world can teach us a lot.

The vast possessions and complications of a modern western life are swamping our basic human needs, and modern society’s current dissatisfaction may indicate that such basic needs may not be being totally fulfilled.

Getting back to those basic needs and basic possessions are part of the joy of cycle touring. I found it took time to return to modern society after a long tour - what is all this stuff in my house for!

On my first three month tour a few times I had moments of deep despair and loneliness but listened. On the second three month tour I could sometimes feel those same feelings but they were more comfortable and as they rose I could deal with the feelings and continue to enjoy the tour. Perhaps on a much more extended tour as this gentleman has done, he has reached the point of dealing mentally with the conflict of simplicity vs. modern life. He seems very Zen!

I stumbled across one guy’s blog recently and read it from start to finish. Very enjoyable! Great touring tales and an insight to his time learning yoga and meditation in India. His insights into Buddism are interesting and could help on the road to living with fewer cravings! Many long distance tourers cite ‘Mindfulness’ as a very useful skill to practice while on the road for long periods of time.

Anyway a good read here …

http://cyclehacker.com
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 05:25:41 PM by StuntPilot »

jags

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2017, 08:01:03 PM »
Re: Tim's expressed philosophy: I'm often astonished at how it seems I have everything I could possibly want or need with me on tour. It is hard to conceive of any real need for all the things left waiting at home...or, indeed, a home.

Anyone else feel the same on tours short or long?

Best,

Dan.
Not me Dan i'm always happy to get back to the nest i just haven't got gypsy blood in me .
cycling blood yes love me bikes and me cycling around the lanes of Louth and Meath that will do it for me ,even if i were in  the best of health i don't think i could do a  massive big tour ,setting up a tent every day would seriously crack me up  finding stuff in panniers major hassle and don't talk to me about weather  man i sooner buy a rohloff bike  :'(
horses for courses as the man said  ;)

Danneaux

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2017, 09:55:17 PM »
Quote
...man i sooner buy a rohloff bike...
NOooooooooooo!  :o :) ;) :D ;D
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That's the beauty of it all, Anto; no right or wrong way, just the best way for each of us.  :)

All the best,

Dan.

StuntPilot

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2017, 11:49:13 AM »
Jags - the biggest thing that bugged me was getting my sleeping bag back in its stuff sack every morning! No problem with setting up or taking down the tent!

jags

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Re: Tim James Davies
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2017, 05:45:38 PM »
i though i was been clever on my last tour i made a list of were everything goes and  stuck the list  on the inside of each pannier it lasted one day  :'( :'(
so instead of having each pannier the exact same weight i was all over the place ,concentration of a goldfish  ;D
bikepacker was a feckin genius when it came to setting up and packing up,  he could set up his tent in 3 minutes  no problem but then again he's touring a lotta years .
even at home i can never remember where the hell i put stuff ,
still i  suppose it's all part of the fun  ;D

anto.
(geek of the week)