Author Topic: Snapped Stem cover plate  (Read 542 times)

Danneaux

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2017, 11:42:37 PM »
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An expedition bike is supposed to look like it has traveled somewhere.  Or, was this not your Nomad?
Comforting words, George, and largely in agreement, but if it had been the Nomad I would have come unhinged. "Fortunately", this was an old MTB I rehabbed into a lighter-weight Adventure bike and gravel grinder. I got the frame from a pawn shop and it was ehm, "cosmetically challenged". The rest of my bikes look as new, even the 47 year-old Raleigh Grand Sports.

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I had a bad crash in May 2012.  After two shoulder surgeries, I think my last physical therapy session was in April 2015 or so, almost three years later.g

You are very fortunate.
Boy, I'll say! Looking back at what Andy wrote, I fear the outcome was worse than he said...
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I ended up over the bars and was only saved by landing face first on a front Surly rack and my chest on the bars.
  :'( This can't be good, Andy. Are you okay? I can't imagine you got through that unscathed. I know you are a Brave Soldier (and have seen it myself), but I fear this left you the worse for wear. All healing thoughts your way.

All the best,

Dan.

pavel

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2017, 12:17:51 AM »
Andy ... I recommend Pub therapy.  Get thee some medicine, right away!

Andybg

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2017, 09:03:50 AM »
Thanks for the concern Dan.

All things considered I got off very lightly. My chest is a bit tender this morning where it hit the bars but nothing serious. The worst bit of damage I have done to myself is gashed my bum quite badly where I have slid off the front of the B17 saddle. That will teach me not to clench so much lol.

I am relieved that there is a reason for the failure, rather than it being one of those things that just happen. This way I can rebuild it with the right parts and forget about it.

I had been toying with the idea of removing the front rack - It is seriously heavy and rarely gets used. It will now be staying.

Cheers

Andy

Danneaux

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2017, 01:13:15 PM »
<Whew!>

Thanks so much for the update, Andy.  Very glad things weren't worse. All healing thoughts your way!

Yes, that front rack surely came in handy!

All the best,

Dan.

martinf

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2017, 06:05:17 AM »
I think I would be happier with a steel stem, at least for my "touring" Raven Tour.

Found this link:

http://www.kinetics-online.co.uk/framebuilding/custom-stems/

A bit pricey, but should have a service life of decades.

If the builder can make a quill stem version, it would be an option for my old derailleur touring bike. With a custom stem I could fit modern handlebars that have a larger diameter centre bulge - 25.4 diameter are getting harder to find and the shape and width options are limited.

I have had steel bars and stem on my old 650B utility bike for many years, the stem is fairly basic so quite heavy. The straight bars are made from lightweight Tange Prestige tubing and not much heavier than their equivalent in aluminium, they also seem a bit more comfortable.

Danneaux

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2017, 06:21:43 AM »
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I think I would be happier with a steel stem, at least for my "touring" Raven Tour....A bit pricey, but should have a service life of decades.
<nods> For sure. You're right about weight, too; a steel stem fabricated from good tubing is not so heavy compared to many aluminum offerings.

I made my own adjustable stoker stem for my tandem using cro-moly tubing, using TiG welding and fillet brazing for the joins. It is actually the portion that clamps doubly to the captain's seatpost. A quill stem sleeves into it and is held by its own wedge expander plus two clamp bolts in bosses. It has worked well for more than two decades and doesn't twist in its mounts yet is quickly and easily adjustable for the reach of various stokers.

Similarly, I made the hinged handlebar mast for my Folder from cro-moly tubing as well. It incorporates an elastomer to provide limited front suspension. Every time the bike folds, the handlebar clamp is released or tightened to hold the 'bars in place. Though I could have milled the part from aluminum billet, I felt much better fabricating it from steel in light of the expected flex cycles.

Steel is just so...reliable...and has such nice riding characteristics; steel is indeed very "real".  ;)

Best,

Dan.

mickeg

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2017, 12:10:15 PM »
Or, Titanium.  Who knows, you might win the lottery tomorrow.  Just what you need for your travel bike.
http://zinncycles.com/Zinn/components/travel-stems/




Danneaux

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Re: Snapped Stem cover plate
« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2017, 07:53:32 PM »
Yeah! I've seen those, George. Nice they keep the handlebar alignment and much quicker than removing and retorquing 2-4 cover plate bolts.

Best,

Dan.