Author Topic: Travel tips -- what're yours?  (Read 840 times)

in4

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Re: Travel tips -- what're yours?
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2017, 01:48:24 PM »
Great photo of the Nomad, all hidden away in a suitcase Mickeg. Makes the appeal of S&S couplings that much greater.

mickeg

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Re: Travel tips -- what're yours?
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2017, 02:12:08 PM »
It is possible that as a foreigner [please, I do mean this in a nice way], a foreigner (who is subject to far more rules and regulations) than anyone inside the EU understands...you might have been more sensitive to many situations than someone who is an EU national ?

Throughout the EU, there are no border checks for EU nationals...and no problems taking photos of border crossings :)

There are rules in place regarding military and other installations but these are on a country by country basis, and no-one in their right mind would stand outside of (say) an Army Base and start taking photos...

I am in USA.  Sometimes the Canadian border can be a bit hard to find in the wilderness.  I go on a canoe trip each fall in the designated wilderness in USA called the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, which borders on the Quetico Provincial Park in Canada.  There were no guards, fences or anything else around when I took these photos of the border markers.  Guards there do not exist.


mickeg

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Re: Travel tips -- what're yours?
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2017, 02:36:09 PM »
Great photo of the Nomad, all hidden away in a suitcase Mickeg. Makes the appeal of S&S couplings that much greater.

Saved me a lot of money for air fare by not having an oversize bike box.  I think it was about $300 USD in savings for that trip.  But the cost (in addition to the purchase price of the higher cost frame) also included about $250 USD for the case and a couple hours in each direction for disassembly/packing and unpacking/re-assembly.

Savings are highly dependent on which airline you use and how much you can save.

I built up the bike so I am comfortable with the mechanical aspects of it, but those that are less mechanically inclined might not be as interested.  When you are even taking the water bottle cages off the frame, fork out of the frame, etc., it could be less appealing to some.

The Nomad is a heavy bike, that with the weight of the case and you are close to the weight limit.  I had a few bike parts in the green bag.  The rear rack (Tubus Logo) did not fit in the case with the Nomad, that was also in the green bag.

A big advantage of avoiding the oversize box is that I can take a taxi to and from the airport.  Taxis in my community do not have the capability to haul a bike box sized box, thus I would have to rely on the very few friends that have a large enough vehicle to ferry me to and from an airport.  The ease of getting to and from an airport without a bike box I am concluding can be almost as important as the lower air fare cost.

And if you have a coupled bike but you travel with someone that does not, you still may have the difficulties of worrying about how to get to and from an airport when one of you can't use a normal taxi.  My last trip, I traveled with someone that does not have a coupled bike.  We ended up driving several days to and from the starting point instead of flying, in part because his bike is not coupled. 

pavel

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Re: Travel tips -- what're yours?
« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2017, 04:44:40 PM »

I am in USA.  Sometimes the Canadian border can be a bit hard to find in the wilderness.  I go on a canoe trip each fall in the designated wilderness in USA called the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, which borders on the Quetico Provincial Park in Canada.  There were no guards, fences or anything else around when I took these photos of the border markers.  Guards there do not exist.


That's because the indigenous population of Beaver, Otter and Moose are Don't watch CNN and are relatively happy and content as a result of their completely not modern lives.  Perhaps there's a lesson there?

Now of course while it's stricktly correct that there are no Border Guards as in other civilized places along the 49th, however, I'd argue that they are just as well guarded. Those clouds of fanatical Mosquito and black-fly hordes strike terror to modern evil doers used to only moving about in behind Air-conditioned glass. It's effective.  :)

I thought I'd post a slightly off topic link to a google search engine result of one of the places in around that region. I was exceptionally lucky that I got to start camping via a canoe trip at age two and a half.  I still have one memory of it.  By age 8 my parents were taking me camping and canoeing in the general region of the boundary waters on the Canadian side. I got to spend whole weeks exploring Killarney Provincial park, Manitoulin island and especially the Bruce peninsula, which I consider one of the most beautiful places anywhere in the world - but of which many have never heard of.  I present the beauty of the Bruce Peninsula - https://www.google.com/search?q=bruce+peninsula+state+park&num=40&client=safari&rls=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiYs8uMq4HUAhUFQiYKHf8VAKUQsAQIVA&biw=2315&bih=1320#imgrc=E0KozcAynijklM:


So; perhaps my tip is "share your outdoor passion with the future generation". Best done by example - of course.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 04:56:42 PM by pavel »