Author Topic: bikepacking trips  (Read 618 times)

jags

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bikepacking trips
« on: November 30, 2016, 10:57:17 AM »
http://www.dreammodels.dk/cykelrejser/


just seen this on facebook.

jags.

bobs

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Re: bikepacking trips
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2016, 03:40:30 PM »
Has it got you dreaming Anto

Bob

jags

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Re: bikepacking trips
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2016, 03:44:59 PM »
ah i'm always dreaming Bob  ::)

bobs

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Re: bikepacking trips
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2016, 05:07:00 PM »
Here's something to fuel your dreams,

http://www.bikepacking.com

jags

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Re: bikepacking trips
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2016, 05:41:26 PM »
Cheers Bob i think good and all the bikepacking stuff is i would rather have  racks for holding my gear.i rode deep section rims  on my look kx light (on loan) certainly there were light and fast but in a cross wind they were lethal ,so those frame bags are a big no no for this ould bird.
the light weight gear is great tho, make sense to go as light as possible .

anto.

mickeg

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Re: bikepacking trips
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2016, 06:25:19 PM »
I did buy a really cheap frame bag that I can put on my Nomad.  I did use it as a day pack to hold extra water, tube, tools, etc on some day tripping while I was pretending that my Nomad was a mountain bike.  See photo.  And my handlebar bag is not much smaller than the roll of stuff they usually hang from their handlebars.

But while I was out doing that, I was car camping.  I met several bikepacking groups that were trying the bikepacking thing on the same trails that I was day tripping on.  Every single group of bikepackers I met had run out of water before they made the destination or had to take a detour during the day to get more water.  A couple of them looked dangerously dehydrated and one of them I gave some water to even though he was less than a km from a clean water source because I was not sure he would make it that far.  The ones I met took the ultralight thing to an extreme that I thought was bordering on unsafe.

The bikepackers I met loved that experience.  I however would have been cold, hungry, thirsty and quite unhappy.  To them the biking was the experience.  To me, using a bike as my transport was part of the experience too but enjoying the location when off the bike was a key part of my experience.  To them, the clothes that they wore on the bike was totally adequate.  To me, I like to change into clean clothes after I make my destination.  If you want to minimize your weight so much that you have a large cup that doubles as a pot and a spork for your entire collection of cooking and eating utensils, bikepacking is for you.  But if you are like me and want to eat with fork and separate spoon while you can drink out of a mug while using a separate bowl or plate for your food, then you will be like me and put your cooking gear in your heavier panniers.

I can understand the bikepackers, but I have different ideas on what makes a trip enjoyable.

jags

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Re: bikepacking trips
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2016, 06:55:02 PM »
oh mick i do like my comfort especially camping ;)
i'm a total fred when it come to sleeping under the stars i love the idea of it but the reality is a lot different.but yeah i have a pretty good camping set up, love to buy a much lighter 4 season tent but honestly don't think that will ever happen..

change of cloths is number one on my list when my days cycling is done ,shower clean cloths coffe /tea food relax  buy a lottery ticket well u never know your luck. ;)

anto.
 

John Saxby

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Re: bikepacking trips
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2016, 03:13:26 PM »
Quote
I have different ideas on what makes a trip enjoyable

With you there, George.  On my trip in the Rockies & Cascadia this past summer, there were a few days when I ran low on water, and although I was never in trouble, I like to have a wide margin in these matters.

I did meet a couple of parties who had had trouble with the weather on the eastern slopes of Mt Washington, a combination of cold, wet, and insufficient food, and while they managed OK, their experience was a reminder that even on tarmac, you can quickly find yourself in difficulty in the mountains. Same goes for desert and semi-desert terrain.