Author Topic: Wasatch Nomad  (Read 4080 times)

JimK

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2016, 11:12:32 PM »
Got a good bit further up Farmington Canyon Rd today. This lady passed me and I asked her how high she was going and she said she'd already done one loop and maybe she'd get to the tower this go round. She stopped to take off a layer - it was cool in the morning with a bit of rain but then it was getting hot plus of course a 13% grade will warm a person up - so I asked, just to be sure... a loop? Like across the top and down into Bountiful? Oh yes, the response. Wow! There be titans on these roads!

The base of the hills is at 4400 feet elevation. We got up to about 5650 before declaring victory and heading back down for lunch. The fork up top is at about 7200 feet, and either way you go, loop or tower, you'll be over 9000 feet. Well, the good news, after the pavement stops the gnarly 13% stops too and it's more like maybe 6%. Still in gear 1 but a nice comfy 3.7 mph instead of the 2.4 mph struggle.

The loop (someday?!): https://ridewithgps.com/routes/14391337




Danneaux

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2016, 03:01:48 AM »
Terrific photos, Jim, and a nice writeup. I'm so glad you're getting a chance to enjoy these new surroundings on the Nomad. It must be pretty close to ideal for your needs.

Also magnificent is your beard! After 22 years with a moustache, I recently joined the Naked Lip Brigade and am still trying to get used to feeling the breezes above my mouth and below my nose. Seemed a good time to do it and so get an even suntan over the summer. You've taken up the torch, Man! Well done.

Take care, and enjoy all you can during your stay.

All the best,

Dan.

John Saxby

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2016, 03:21:44 AM »
Great stuff, Jim, and wow! What. A. Growth.  I recognized the bike, but not the guy behind it  ;-)

Great country, isn't it?  Bet you hardly miss the trees!  The canyons are special -- great downhills :-)

Cheers,

John

JimK

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2016, 04:40:32 AM »
Wendy made some off-hand comment about what would I look like with a beard, and that pushed me over a cliff that I didn't even know was there! I've let my beard grow a few times in the past. This time I am playing with mustache wax. Wendy is still in a bit of shock over the size of the fire started by such a tiny spark!

Coming back down the canyon I kept my speed pretty low mostly. Loose surface plus big drops over the edge! At the bottom I felt my rims - plenty warm! And that was just 1200 feet!

Yeah one thing about the absence of trees is the presence of views! And there are a few trees too! Things are nice and green here now. I wonder how it will be in August!

John Saxby

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2016, 05:54:59 PM »
We used to visit Marcia's parent regularly in July or August.  Temps regularly went above 100 F, "but it's a dry heat", to flip around a Canajan mantra. I used to do my hiking in those temps, but that was usually in the shade of the forest -- more trees & shade on the northern & eastern slops of the Wasatch, as you may know, and it gets bloody hot & dry descending in the afternoon.

Watch out for the inversions in the SLC bowl, as well.

Be very careful in that weather, Jim, lotsa water, with hydra-lite (or similar) tabs.

Your beard will shade your lower neck & collarbone, though!!  :-)

Best to you, Wendy and Dante,

John

JimK

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2016, 10:43:57 PM »
Thanks for the tips, John. A week ago we were out on a hot day and wow it was really getting too much. We found a spot of shade and cooled off for a few minutes. Around 97F but that sun is intense and probably the pavement is quite a bit hotter.

My main water additive is: https://www.amazon.com/EMERGEN-C-ELECTRO-MIX-Lemon-Lime-4-2/dp/B002HWRY5S/

but I also use: https://www.amazon.com/NUUN-Multi-Flavor-Tubes-Hydration/dp/B00AMKBX04/

and I just starting trying: https://www.amazon.com/Orgain-Organic-Hydration-Powder-Coconut/dp/B00UKPU9YC

probably the best though is just starting early in the day! The afternoon heat can really be just too much!

Danneaux

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2016, 12:48:53 AM »
Jim,

When desert touring, I usually awaken at 4:50am and am on the road about 15 minutes later, stopping to make and eat breakfast about 20mi/32km down the road to ensure I'm up and at 'em and moved on before the heat of the day. It can be miserable sleeping till the sun is really up and then starting once the pavement is heat-soaked, raising temperatures further.

Good to remain well-hydrated throughout the day and replenish those electrolytes as you're doing.

Looking forward to more of your adventures.

All the best,

Dan.

JimK

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2017, 05:04:32 AM »
back on the bike today! Just a mile, from the storage unit to the new apartment here in Utah. I left my bike here when we left in August - we went back to New York so the young man could finish college. Now he is a college graduate, electrical engineering, and ready to start back at work here in Utah. Lots of snow on the ground... and we have PODS containers arriving to be unloaded on two consecutive weekends... but that little mile felt great, and I will surely be looking for ways to sneak out!

Danneaux

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2017, 05:50:29 AM »
Excellent, Jim!

Near or far, there's no bad rides.  :)

All the best,

Dan.

jags

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2017, 11:27:51 AM »
class what a country. ;)

JimK

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2017, 01:52:11 AM »
ah, first tiny ride: https://ridewithgps.com/routes/18578195 out and back, just 13 miles. Sunny and a bit below freezing with a gentle breeze. Big snow coming so it may be a while before I can get out again!

JimK

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2018, 09:34:05 PM »
My original grips were getting quite worn and I was thinking that bar ends could be a nice way to reduce stress on my wrists and maybe help me get a bit lower in headwinds. Plus my pedals - plastic - were looking worn and the reflectors mostly fallen out. So... new pedals, new grips!


Andre Jute

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #27 on: February 01, 2018, 11:44:21 PM »
Every little thing helps to make yours look like one serious bike, Jim.

Matt2matt2002

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2018, 12:06:30 AM »
 Nice to see the Chainglider. Snap.
I've had one in my Raven for 2+ years.
Happy with yours?
Never drink and drive. You may hit a bump  and spill your drink

JimK

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Re: Wasatch Nomad
« Reply #29 on: February 02, 2018, 02:52:56 AM »
Another bit of maintenance today... I'd notice my chain was dirty and a bit dry. The chainglider wasn't fitted together snugly - up around the chainrings somehow there was a gap. So I took the whole thing off, brushed the worst of the dirt off the chain, oiled the chain, and snapped the chainglider back on. I was careful about getting those tabs fitted into their slots - the thing went back together snugly, which was very satisfying! I had not done any lubrication or maintenance on that chain in several thousand miles. I find the chainglider to be a great device, very effective. Still, occasional maintenance is a good idea, I think!

My first test ride... around the 9.5 mile mark I was grocery shopping. Ten or fifteen pounds of this and that. A few hills to get home from there. I am liking these bar ends. I can put my hands out on the remote bits and that seems to help with the extra torque required... and 11% grade is not trivialized by a 17 inch gear!

https://www.strava.com/activities/1387146638