Author Topic: Carradice questions  (Read 7710 times)

il padrone

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #30 on: April 22, 2016, 09:27:08 AM »
I have recently acquired the Carradice Classic Saddlebag Rack, and I am loving it. Holds the bag that little bit higher from the tyre and sits up more (easier to get access). Also it is VERY readily removable and can be transferred to any brooks saddle with seat bag loops.




Donerol

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #31 on: April 22, 2016, 10:16:08 AM »
Note though that the maximum recommended load is 6Kg, which may not be enough for Danneaux's purposes. Somewhere I have seen reports of this rack breaking the tangs that slot into the bag loops when it was overloaded. Also with a heavy load there may be a risk of breaking the saddle rails - think bouncing over poor roads - as there will be quite a lot of leverage.

rualexander

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #32 on: April 22, 2016, 06:26:09 PM »
Note though that the maximum recommended load is 6Kg, which may not be enough for Danneaux's purposes. Somewhere I have seen reports of this rack breaking the tangs that slot into the bag loops when it was overloaded. Also with a heavy load there may be a risk of breaking the saddle rails - think bouncing over poor roads - as there will be quite a lot of leverage.
My Classic rack tangs bent the bag loops on my B17 saddle on my recent bothy mini tour on gravel roads,  it might have been a bit overloaded with my Super C Saddlebag but not too much, it definitely bounced a fair bit on rough sections. The tangs didn't bend but once the bag loops were bent the tangs could no longer hold themselves in place and the bag started falling off. I've bent the loops back now and the rack holds on again fine with my Super C Barley.

Danneaux

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #33 on: April 22, 2016, 07:29:48 PM »
Quote
Note though that the maximum recommended load is 6Kg, which may not be enough for Danneaux's purposes...
Duly noted; thanks!

All the best,

Dan.

martinf

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #34 on: April 23, 2016, 08:14:16 AM »
I had the same problem as Rualexander with the Classic saddlebag support bending saddlebag loops, which is why I got the Kwiklift supports.

These normally clamp to the saddle rails, titanium on my 700C tourer so there might be a risk of saddle rail breakage. Not had any problems so far and the Kwiklift is made from aluminium alloy, so it shouldn't score the Ti.

Not an issue on my other bikes with Kwiklift, these have sprung saddles and I had to modify the Kwiklift to fit it at the bottom of the springs.

Donerol

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2016, 12:44:12 PM »
But can you still get the Kwiklift?

Danneaux

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #36 on: April 23, 2016, 06:26:36 PM »
Quote
But can you still get the Kwiklift?
A similar product is made by Nitto in Japan as the Saddlebag Grip R50 - 20109, sold by Rivendell and other outlets:
http://www.rivbike.com/product-p/r13.htm

It appears nicely developed and of high quality, but the price is USD$100.

All the best,

Dan.

geocycle

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #37 on: April 25, 2016, 08:46:29 AM »
I've taken my bagman support apart and just been using the QR mechanism with good results.  The cadet sits very nicely on the rack with no noticeable swing.  I'm not using any attachment to the rack although that would be an option.  This works well for me as I can mix and match pannier and saddlebag use depending on my journey.  The rack is a couple of hundred g heavier than the bagman but it is easier leaving it in situ than removing it each time I switch to the saddlebag. Whether this works for others depends on the drop between the saddle rails and the rack of course.
 

Danneaux

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #38 on: April 25, 2016, 04:32:42 PM »
I'll need to measure the saddle-to-rack gap on my bikes, Geo'. Good suggestion. Some of my rear racks are very light, so this is a possibility for me as well.

All the best,

Dan.

mickeg

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #39 on: April 25, 2016, 10:33:13 PM »
I'll need to measure the saddle-to-rack gap on my bikes, Geo'. Good suggestion. Some of my rear racks are very light, so this is a possibility for me as well.

All the best,

Dan.

Don't rule out one of those racks that clamps onto the seatpost with a quick release, the center of the saddle bag can sit on one of those and those are quite adjustable for height.  That kind of rack would look a bit odd with a wide Carradice bag, but they still have a reasonable weight capacity and should not bounce too much.  But, those racks can't be set as close to the tire as some of the other racks, so that won't work if your bag is too low.

Danneaux

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #40 on: April 26, 2016, 01:57:59 AM »
Good thoughts, mickeg; I'll keep my options open.

All the best,

Dan.

Danneaux

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #41 on: May 03, 2016, 07:29:57 PM »
So...! A new question:

Please, does anyone have experience with a Bagman Expedition Quick-Release?

Looking closely, I see the older design of the Bagman2 has been abandoned by Carradice. It used two support struts under the aluminum-rod support hoop. Current models have returned to a hoop made of stainless rod and not supports.

To me, it looks like riding on rough roads could apply a great deal of torque to the joint where a small allen screw retains the end of the stainless rod in the aluminum saddle rail clamp. I have read reports indicating these bolts need replacement with hex head versions and threadlock, but is that enough? Are these hoop supports stable enough with a loaded bag the size of the Camper Longflap?

Comparing weights, it seems the Bagman Expedition QR is roughly comparable in weight to a lightweight rear rack made of aluminum rod. I'm beginning to think a Bagman QR saddle clamp and a rear rack might be preferable to the whole Bagman Expedition QR. 

All thoughts welcome before I splash out for something that might not suit my needs. I really would like a quick-release, but with a full bag, I think I'd like to keep the weight low. Also, I'd like to go for a more stable solution given the rough roads I will ride.

All the best,

Dan.

in4

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #42 on: May 03, 2016, 08:08:02 PM »
Hmm FWIW Dan:

I have a Camper Longflap that is not really compatible with my Brooks Conquest; absence of saddle loops. That said I have used it for day rides. I pass the straps through the saddle springs and rest the Camper Longflap on a rack; additionally secured by male/female velcro strips. I also 'borrowed' an Estate Agent's/ Realtor's 'For Sale' sign and cut it down to use as an insert; the sign is made out of a corrugated plastic-type material that is both light and reasonably supportive. It also stops the lightly loaded Camper Longflap from drooping either side of  the rack. My point being: Perhaps a secondary support might be a consideration; more so if you intend to load your Camper Longflap up to the brim.

Bill C

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #43 on: May 03, 2016, 09:16:34 PM »
So...! A new question:

Please, does anyone have experience with a Bagman Expedition Quick-Release.....................All thoughts welcome before I splash out for something that might not suit my needs. I really would like a quick-release, but with a full bag, I think I'd like to keep the weight low. Also, I'd like to go for a more stable solution given the rough roads I will ride.

All the best,

Dan.

the bagman wire/stainless support bracket,not worth it, the support holds small loads but anything heavy and it's like riding with stuff attached to a trampoline, i took the wire support off and use the rack for support


Dan
the newer bagmans have 4 grub screws two to lock the loop and the other two is to lock the first set of grub screws
the older ones only used two and fell apart if a grub screw came loose, the other thing worth mentioning is that the sprung sliding/draw catches are only held together with a single screw (it's the little catch arm) if the catch arm/screw comes loose then it can fire the gubbins across the road never to be found again, i know as it's happened to my old silver one (hard to explain so i'll post a pic in a bit when i get the camera out)

a bagman is a good idea but could do with some work to make it a bit stronger/more reliable (loctite)

found a pic the two little black plastic  sleeved pins are the ones i was on about, i had one work loose and drop out
the metal sprung sleeve that the go's through the bag loops shot out as it's spring loaded,
I never found and it couldn't find spares so that bagman's been drilled through for some 4mm threaded rod as a bodge up


« Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 11:45:15 PM by Bill C »

Donerol

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Re: Carradice questions
« Reply #44 on: May 04, 2016, 12:31:51 PM »
Dan, I personally think that you'd be better using a rack to support the weight. I haven't used a Bagman myself but there are lots of reports of a tendency to bounce - it wouldn't be a problem with a smaller bag but I think it would be quite disconcerting with a full Camper, and must put quite a strain on the saddle rails.  If you do get the Bagman I would do without the support loop and either let a rear rack take some of the weight, or do without,  fasten the bottom retaining strap to the seatpost and put up with your thighs brushing the bag as you pedal.

Of course back in the day when large saddlebags were more common, people didn't bother with quick release, but strapped them up snugly to the saddle and seatpost.

It's possible, depending on your set-up, to bodge a QR solution, with hooks such as bimini clips. Basically, you remove the sprung retaining bit, then put the bags straps though the slot so that the open part of the hook faces to the rear. You insert the hooks into the saddle loops, approaching the loops from behind . Then secure the bottom of the bag either to the seat post or the turned-up bit of the rack if it has one. Because the bag hangs at an angle, the hooks can't jump out of the saddle loops. It does depend on your particular geometry but I'd have thought that with your metal-working skills you could make something to fit. (Those bimini clips are bigger than they need to be.)

I sometimes hang a Barley like this, using gaiter hooks zip-tied directly to the wooden dowel. It works really well as a QR except that the gaiter hooks are aluminium and wear quickly - I keep looking for a better solution