Author Topic: Stand Reinforcement  (Read 3157 times)

Andre Jute

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3125
Re: Stand Reinforcement
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2016, 11:26:07 PM »
O-rings, available from motor factors in a wide range of sizes, do very well for holding instruments and controls on the handlebars and would hold the brake too if sized right.

The idea in this thread I like best is Dan's for a tab integrated into the dropout, adapted to a bolt-on like the Pletscher/ESG stand. Such a tab can also be machined into the Rohloff-designed OEM slider dropouts, making them a one-stop shop of mounts (axle, anti-turn nub, disc brakes, fender struts, rack mounts, stand mount -- a very busy piece of aluminium), keeping the frame clean.

The Pletscher stand, widely considered the best hub-end stand available, has one small problem, already mentioned in this thread: It doesn't matter what you do, every five years or so the bolts loosen themselves, so make sure your annual touch on the essential bolts on your bike takes in the stand bolts, easy to overlook since the standard bolts supplied are black and countersunk into the black attachment tab at the top of the stand.

Danneaux

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7542
  • reisen statt rasen
Re: Stand Reinforcement
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2016, 03:03:36 AM »
Quote
Am I alone in thinking that there used to be a stand that somehow hinged from the crossbar that had a couple of legs on it that was very robust?  Probably back in the 50s-60s though.  Or was it a figment of my imagination?
Not imagination, Temp'; I remember it too.

Sticks in my mind it was a Ron Kitchener or Gerry Burgess/GB part, no later than mid-1960s. I remember seeing photos of one and yes, it was a bipod design that mounted to one side of the top tube and unfolded to make a stable structure. Seems I recall it being a bit bulky when folded, though.

I'llrifle through my files and see if I can find it....

Best,

Dan.

Adam32

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: Stand Reinforcement
« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2018, 12:21:36 PM »
Quote
Am I alone in thinking that there used to be a stand that somehow hinged from the crossbar that had a couple of legs on it that was very robust?  Probably back in the 50s-60s though.  Or was it a figment of my imagination?
Not imagination, Temp'; I remember it too.

Sticks in my mind it was a Ron Kitchener or Gerry Burgess/GB part, no later than mid-1960s. I remember seeing photos of one and yes, it was a bipod design that mounted to one side of the top tube and unfolded to make a stable structure. Seems I recall it being a bit bulky when folded, though.

I'llrifle through my files and see if I can find it....

Best,

Dan.


Did anyone manage to find a picture of this as I would love to see one

mickeg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1519
Re: Stand Reinforcement
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2018, 02:52:53 PM »
This thread started before I built up my Titanium bike.  I did not want to clamp a side or center stand on that bike.  Instead I use something similar to a Clickstand.  My seat stays join at the rear of the seattube and create a small pocket that I can put a pole into.  (Not all bikes have a pocket there, my Nomad does not.)  By locking one or both brakes with some elastic bands, I can use that pole as a substitute for a Clickstand.

The pole used to be a tent pole, if I recall correctly it is 11mm in diameter so not very flexible, does not bend easily.  I cut each section shorter, I wanted the total package to fit in my handlebar bag.  The rubber piece on each end is the rubber cap for the bottom of a trekking pole.

I usually use the elastic bands that women often use for their hair for my parking brake.  One USD ($) at their store for a card.  Loop it over the handlebar twice and store it there.
https://www.dollartree.com/Basic-Solutions-Jumbo-Clasp-Free-Elastics/p316748/index.pro

I bought some flat elastic, I was going to sew up some better brake bands, but have not gotten around to it.  I once saw one on a bicycle trail, I suspected someone dropped, I picked it up and works great.  Shown in third photo.  Black on black handlebar tape so not really obvious but you can make it out.




rualexander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 858
Re: Stand Reinforcement
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2018, 03:21:53 PM »
An example from the CTC forum of a kickstand damaging a frame: https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=120018&sid=f300829122f7e2a7bb4b6f67d05f0315

mickeg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1519
Re: Stand Reinforcement
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2018, 06:26:28 PM »
An example from the CTC forum of a kickstand damaging a frame: https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=120018&sid=f300829122f7e2a7bb4b6f67d05f0315

Kickstands that mount behind the bottom bracket usually come with large bolts and some new mechanics will see a bolt with a really big wrench size and conclude it needs to be cranked really tight.  I always tried to get it tight enough, but not too tight.  I only have two bikes with side stands mounted behind the bottom bracket, one I was careful to only tighten as much as needed and the other bike had a stand welded onto the frame by the manufacturer.

My Titanium bike, I do not want to risk it.  Thus the tent pole substitute shown above.