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Non-Thorn Related / Re: RIDES 2018 — add yours here
« Last post by Andre Jute on June 24, 2018, 02:42:25 AM »
And the contrasting regular corrugated and rustic wood stripy backgrounds of that "quilted rooster" absolutely makes the photo. Well caught, John. The varied detail of the interested eye and ear in the written report of the ride doesn't escape me, but we've mentioned it before; you must've been a very good teacher.

When we first started these annual "Rides" threads, they were in the hope of giving less adventurous -- for whatever reason -- members insights from around the world, and inspiration for those with the legs and the lungs and the will. I must say, just looking up this current page here, we have reports of rides, long and short, from Jim in Utah, Mike in Australia (in countryside I know actually, from when I lived in Melbourne and Adelaide), Swission in Dorset and John in Canada, and more from other members on the many other pages, and this is only halfway through the year; you can't help but consider that a grand world tour, and there is so much more on the earlier pages.

No tourist agency can match this thread! All kudos to the posters, and much gratitude for sharing.
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Member's Gallery / Re: My Camel on the road
« Last post by mickeg on June 24, 2018, 02:38:14 AM »
I can't quite figure out how you mounted a platform rack on your fork.  Next time you take some photos, could you get a closeup of that rack and mounting?

George,

Julio has a separate thread for his Nomad, and has posted some photos of his front rack. I think these are the photos that you are looking for.
    http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=11810.msg86558#msg86558

- DaveS

Thanks.  That was posted while I was in the middle of my Iceland trip so I was not watching forum postings at that time.

Interesting rack. 


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Non-Thorn Related / Re: RIDES 2018 — add yours here
« Last post by John Saxby on June 23, 2018, 11:19:44 PM »
Thanks for your kind words, Ian--glad you liked the pix :)

The price of housing in the County has gone up rapidly and a long way in recent years--so much so that local people with jobs that give a modest salary have trouble finding affordable housing.  As the wine industry has grown, the area has been "discovered", and is well on its way to becoming A Destination.  Many well-off retirees from larger centres such as Toronto and Ottawa are moving to the County.  That farmhouse might well fetch Cdn$500,000 or even more, because (from the outside at least) it seems to be in very good condition. I don't know how much land would go with it.  It's on a very quiet side road, but it's not near any water.  Half a million is a lot of money, but on the other hand it'll never be as cheap as it is now...
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Non-Thorn Related / Re: RIDES 2018 — add yours here
« Last post by in4 on June 23, 2018, 11:10:46 PM »
Lovely photos. Very evocative of The Bridges of Madison County  to me.
How much would a prospective  owner have to shell out for that gorgeous farmhouse? Henry, my Nomad would love it there. :)
Thanks for sharing John.
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Non-Thorn Related / Re: RIDES 2018 — add yours here
« Last post by John Saxby on June 23, 2018, 10:58:48 PM »
...and the last two.
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Non-Thorn Related / Re: RIDES 2018 — add yours here
« Last post by John Saxby on June 23, 2018, 10:58:11 PM »
Four more photos from the County...
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Non-Thorn Related / Re: RIDES 2018 — add yours here
« Last post by John Saxby on June 23, 2018, 10:56:33 PM »
Notes and photos from a couple of days of easy rides in a quiet corner of Ontario

Last week Marcia and I spent a few days in Prince Edward County, a peninsula in the northeast corner of Lake Ontario.  We loaded our bikes onto/into our Subaru wagon, and with friends, rented an old farmhouse on a winery.  Our visit was mostly about food, talk and drink, with breaks for some gentle cycling—nothing approaching Mike and Theresa’s grand safari along the Murray, for example, or Julien’s journey through Ireland, Wales, and Wessex.  I’ve written about “the County” before, so what follows may seem familiar for some.
 
The County was one of the first parts of Ontario to be settled by Europeans—farmers who were Quakers of Dutch and German descent from Pennsylvania in the mid-18th century.  They were followed by refugees from the Significant Unpleasantness Next Door between 1776 and 1783.  (Some of those refugees were Mohawks, but they didn’t get the better land—their descendants live further north on more marginal terrain on the mainland.)  The County is fertile and well watered, and by the late 19th century, sustained a fairly prosperous agricultural economy.  Fine old brick farmhouses from that era dot the landscape—photos 1 and 3 below are good examples.  Nowadays, grapes have replaced the fruit and vegetables which were the primary crops a generation or more ago.  The functions of older buildings have changed as well: the grand farmhouse in photo #3 houses a distillery, while the outbuildings in #2 are in disrepair.

Irises graced the garden of the distillery we visited (Photo #4), a family-owned affair nicely named “Kinsip”.  I was always a sucker for any establishment making a pun in its title, and this one offers high-grade spirits, too.  I nearly laid out far too much money for a Crimson Rye (the crimson hue from barrels which had held a local pinot noir, if you please), but chose instead a smaller brandy and a ditto rye with a hint of maple.  In photo #5, Osi the Raven is restin’ his burden against a big old maple, while I photographed the super paint job in #6.  (I was always a sucker for red-and-cream with silver accents.)

There are still standard-issue functioning farms, as well.  Photo #7 shows an emerging crop (of beans, I think) in an impeccably groomed field, all in a flood of thundery light at sunset.  In the pasture a little further along the road, the lovely bay in #8 allowed me to take her picture.  Photo #9 is two of your basic summer farm colours, a field of bright yellow canola beneath a fine blue sky, with the accents of an aluminum barn roof and a wee bit of lake of a deeper blue.

The last word goes to the stylized rooster in #10.  Barns all over the County show murals of quilt patterns.  I liked this image of an audacious fellow—you might even say he was cocky.  (Unless you thought for more than half a second before saying that…)

(Photos are spread over this post and the two following.)
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Member's Gallery / Re: My Camel on the road
« Last post by David Simpson on June 23, 2018, 06:46:04 PM »
I can't quite figure out how you mounted a platform rack on your fork.  Next time you take some photos, could you get a closeup of that rack and mounting?

George,

Julio has a separate thread for his Nomad, and has posted some photos of his front rack. I think these are the photos that you are looking for.
    http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=11810.msg86558#msg86558

- DaveS
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Quote
ride down the white line

Yep, that'll do, Bill.  Just make sure that the white line isn't laid onto chipseal--if it is, the noise of the tires will swallow everything else.

There's a nice new surface on Hwy 6 going SE to Chief Mountain, past Waterton Lakes, which would be an A-grade testing site.  Better to make the climb first, tho', and test on the way down  ;)

Cheers,  John
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Member's Gallery / Re: My Camel on the road
« Last post by mickeg on June 23, 2018, 05:50:41 PM »
I like to put my spare folding tire in a zip lock bag to keep dirt off of it.  If you get a tiny bit of sand inside a tire, it will eventually wear a hole in your inner tube.  And because a tire is pretty dense, it usually is in the bottom of a rear pannier.

I can't quite figure out how you mounted a platform rack on your fork.  Next time you take some photos, could you get a closeup of that rack and mounting?  That is one of several reasons that I really wish Thorn put the canti posts on the front of the fork like everybody else does, on my Sherpa and some other bikes I have a small platform on those canti posts on the front of the fork.

It is not often that I see a bike more loaded down than my Nomad was on my first day in Iceland, but this one looks like it is.  You have teh right bike for that kind of load.

I do not see a pump on your bike.  If you packed it away to avoid theft, that is understandable, I have done that on some trips.  But I usually keep my pump on my frame.
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