Thorn Cycles Forum

Community => Member's Gallery => Topic started by: Matt2matt2002 on February 11, 2013, 10:14:16 PM

Title: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 11, 2013, 10:14:16 PM
Just putting a placer here for my new second hand Raven Tour.
Hence the old bird title.
 Long story cut short....
Andy Evers kindly sold me his Raven Tour and it made its way from Budapest to Cambridge today.
I hope to bring it up to Scotland this weekend.
Pictures to follow.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on February 11, 2013, 10:26:18 PM
Yay!  Can't wait, Matt!

All congratulations your way as purchaser and to AndyBG as seller!

The Invisible hand of Adam Smith is no doubt waving in delight -- particularly if the Forum sees the result in photos.

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: ianshearin on February 11, 2013, 10:28:37 PM
Pictures...... Or it never happened........
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on February 11, 2013, 10:32:13 PM
ah i was looking forward to seening your old bird you tricked me there matt. ;D ;D
but i'll settle for the bike anyway. ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Cambirder on February 11, 2013, 11:12:29 PM
Just putting a placer here for my new second hand Raven Tour.
Hence the old bird title.
 Long story cut short....
Andy Evers kindly sold me his Raven Tour and it made its way from Budapest to Cambridge today.
I hope to bring it up to Scotland this weekend.
Pictures to follow.

Matt

You could give a proper test and ride it home Matt ;D
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andybg on February 12, 2013, 07:25:45 AM
Looking forward to her getting some good use. I think in her life she has probably done under 1000miles and you can just tell she has got a good 100k miles in her.

Am looking forward to future reports and keep up with the photos

Andy
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 22, 2013, 11:27:28 PM
Well, she arrived safe and sound last Monday and is sitting in my garage getting to know my other bike, a Dawes Sadar.
SJS are sending me a set of guards and I have fitted a pair of Lambda pedals. So as soon as she is dressed, the old bird will be appearing here in person.

Despite being undressed, I took her on a climb up the local hill. No more than a mile all told but I couldn't wait to get my leg over. The saddle.  ;)

First impressions of the Rholoff? Smooth and quiet.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on February 22, 2013, 11:30:41 PM
Yay! It's here-It's here-It's here for you!

Nothing quite like that first day of ownership, is there? Electricity on the air, the crackle of excitement, wanting to try it all out...!

Very happy for you, Matt!

All the best,

Dan. (...who thinks of it as "experienced" rather than "old")
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 24, 2013, 02:34:01 PM
Matt's old bird flies.

Managed my first proper run yesterday.
25 miles around the lanes of South West Scotlandshire.
Dull and minus 2 but no ice or traffic. Tarmac and 4 short hills.

I had adjusted he saddle height down a few inches but was aware of being on a big bike.
587L frame

Weight of bike? First few miles felt slow and with the 16/38 rings I was aware I had a few more mph in my tank but couldn't use them. But in the last half of the run I rally flew along. Guess it was part confidence being gained.

On the few short hills there were a stack of gears left spare. I look forward to trying them out fully loaded.

Pedals? The new Lambda felt good with no slips.

Saddle? Andy had kindly passed on a Brooks with the bike. Humm, bricks spring to mind but strangley no ill affects today. Will persivere.

Brakes? Xtrs and swisstops had me stopping on a penny.

Noise? Say again? Ok - some noise in 7 or 8 but that just reminds me I am on a Rholoff.

Feel good factor? Why did I take so long to buy a Thorn?

Next jobs? Work on wheel removal and cover front rack on clear tubing so Ortlieb panniers fit.

While stopped for a coffee half way I felt the urge for a tinker and I disconnected the rear coupling to the gears. A simple twist and pull it was not! Guess there is a knack? Push n twist? Maybe it was the cold but for a few minutes i thought I would be pushing the bike home.

Hope the pictures come out

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 24, 2013, 03:40:57 PM
More pictures from yesterdays run
Forgot to mention the handlebars
Humberts covered with tape.
Very nicely done but I think I may recover them with foam.
i have the correct Humpert brand foam tubes.
Anyone done this? What kind of sticky stuff will i find under the tape and how best to remove it?
Advice folks.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on February 24, 2013, 03:51:50 PM
Fantastic Matt enjoy every pedal stroke great pic's as  well nothing wrong with that camera. ;) ;D
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on February 24, 2013, 05:36:07 PM
Wow! Thanks so much for posting these...absolutely fantastic photos of a lovely bike and ride, Matt!

Really, really happy for you. It's got all the details, too, including a ring-lock!

Quote
What kind of sticky stuff will i find under the tape and how best to remove it?
You'll likely find some sticky stuff beneath the tape, and t is best removed before trying to slide on foam tubes. A number of potions work well, the difference being time-to-effectiveness:

• WD-40
• Peanut butter (creamy rather than crunchy), and peanut oil
• Olive oil

The main thing is to put it on till the goo dissolves, then wipe. Repeated applications may be necessary, and I would suggest a clean with detergent and a rinse after so the 'bars aren't oily.

To install the foam grips, the people either go with diluted dish detergent (me) or aerosol hairspray (heaven help you if it flash-dries before the tubes seat, and the effects on bike paint/finish are not good at all). I made a little tool that allow the job to go much faster: An old Atom pedal cap backed by the expanding rubber from a handlebar-end plug. The pedal dustcap prevents the foam tube from snagging in the end of the handlebar and also prevents the bar-end from punching a hole in the foam tube (don't ask how I know this  ;)). Any small plug that can be easily removed will do, just something to ease the foam over the 'bar. I just finished sliding Grab-Ons grips over my shot-peened compact drops a few weeks ago. Boy! Installation and workout in one! Now, I need to compression-tape the foam tubes using a padded vinyl tape. Doing so greatly increases the foam's durability and abrasion resistance.

Hope this helps. If you run into problems, give a shout.

My! What a beautiful bike! Very happy to see it complete and "out in the wild" for you to ride, Matt!

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 24, 2013, 07:24:16 PM
Thanks Dan.
I'll let you know how I get on with the bars.
Can you throw me a tip for disconnecting the 2 connectors at the rear for the hub?
Is it a push n twist?
Guess they have to come apart to remove the wheel?
The inside appears pointy with a groove.
I did do it twice but there were 5 or 6 minutes of huffling and puffing between events.

Matt who is down in the groove and wants to get the point.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on February 24, 2013, 07:33:39 PM
Hi Matt!

Did you try shifting into Gear 1 or 14 first? That helps considerably.

Here's a nifty tip from the Archives, courtesy gearoidmuar: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=2388.0

Y'do have to pack a wooden clothespin with you to accomplish it.

Yes, those internal cable connectors can be a bit of a challenge, especially with cold hands. The key is to get enough slack to push them together and then twist apart. Other tips here: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=2249.0

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 24, 2013, 09:57:26 PM
I know I'm a new boy here but that wooden peg solution sums up for me the whole Thorn experience.
High tech purpose built technology and a peg.
How very British
 ::)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: il padrone on February 24, 2013, 10:07:05 PM
Thanks Dan.
I'll let you know how I get on with the bars.
Can you throw me a tip for disconnecting the 2 connectors at the rear for the hub?
Is it a push n twist?

I have never used them, as I have the EX box version. But just looking at the photos of the connectors, don't you just rotate them 90 degrees to open the  spring clasps on them? Maybe you need to hold them together a bit but I couldn't imagine it being too tough.

0:35 to 0:44 in this SJS video  - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKwpd2VSDP4

The peg idea was for gearoidmuar to connect them, with an injured thumb. Different sort of problem.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on February 24, 2013, 11:02:05 PM
Yes, shft to 1 or 14 first.  Then it's just a twist with the spring doing the rest.  If its still really tight let some cable out at the adjuster on the v brake brazing.  I sometimes have a problem reconnecting when my hands are cold (most common weather for punchers!). In the absence of a peg I use the notch in a spoke key to hold one side.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 28, 2013, 03:13:04 PM
Front guard fitted this morning. Many thanks Andy for including the cut stays.

Next up rear guard.
Any tips on what bits to fit first? Stays or the frame connection? Is it a bolt on directly job or should I use the bracket supplied?
And there is a middle bracket supplied for the top of the curve. Is this required?

many thanks

matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on February 28, 2013, 03:30:13 PM
My rear mudguard is bolted to the frame at the chainstays and seatstays. Each has about 1 cm of spacer to hold the guard away from the frame. Looks like a couple of nuts provides most of the space.

Do you have a Thorn rear rack? My mudguard stays are fastened to the Thorn rack rather than the dropout. 
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on February 28, 2013, 04:25:37 PM
I'd attach the frame points first so then you can measure the stays. The frame attachments you're stuck with, the stays are much less constrained.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 28, 2013, 04:49:47 PM
Thanks Jim
Problem 1
the bolts will not screw into the lower cross member
pict 1
or the upper cross member near the brakes
pict 2
I am using the bolts supplied by SJS Chromoplastic guards
The threads dont appear correct

Problem 2
The struts of the guards come across at a very bad angle into the 'holes' of the supports for the guards
pict 3
not sure if i can bend them to the correct angle

Any thoughts and ideas much appreciated

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andybg on February 28, 2013, 06:17:52 PM
Hi Matt

Does it feel like the thread is wrong or the size of the bolts is wrong?

I can probably find the original bolts that were off the bike that Thorn would have fitted.

My suggestion would be to check with Thorn what size and pitch the holes should be and then run a tap set up them.

Dont be tempted to "force" the bolts - a tap will do a much better job

Andy
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andybg on February 28, 2013, 06:36:23 PM
Looking at other Thorn Bikes that are using the rear rack for attaching of the mudguard it looks like they only use the closer holes on the mudguard for the attachment and then cut off the bar so that it does not need to line up with the outer hole.

Not the best solution as it does not let you adjust the mudguard in and out to match different tyre sizes but seems the norm.

Andy
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on February 28, 2013, 06:38:14 PM
Yeah, that rearmost stay is a bit of a cheat - looks like it needs rather precise trimming!

No idea about the bolt size - got to be something very boring like M4. I can pull one out to get it checked if you really get stranded, but probably Thorn will tell you.

(http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r6/kukulaj/Nomad/IMG_1591_zpsbbf47ca6.jpg)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on February 28, 2013, 06:41:02 PM
Actually it rather looks as though that stay would clear the bottom of that mudguard fitting if it had been left longer.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 28, 2013, 06:41:32 PM
Thanks Jim
I never mind a good cheat if it gets he job done!
 ;)
Nice picture btw
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 01, 2013, 05:05:16 PM
Managed to remove old bar tape and fit foam over the Hubert bars.
Thanks fr the hints Dan. I used liquid soap and they went on pretty well.
Picture shows the bars. One side a little short.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 01, 2013, 05:15:18 PM
Also decided to cover the font and rear bars of the racks with reinforced tubing.

Not sure who it was on here that did it a month or so ago but I liked the idea. So thanks to whoever you are.

Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 01, 2013, 05:59:18 PM
Ooh! Pictures!  ;D

Matt,

I think you did a fine job on the bike, and each addition or change personalizes it for your use and makes it that much more "yours". The foam pads on the handlebars look very nice indeed, the mudguards are in place and ready to go, and the rack padding is done.

Pretty soon, everything will be finished and the bike can start accumulating some real distance under you!

My, what a lovely-looking machine; you can be proud!

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: bobs on March 01, 2013, 06:33:17 PM
Hi Matt,

A couple of small points, the front mudguards could do with a few spacers to bring the front down and give more clearance for the brake cable. I might be wrong but you won't be able to fit panniers to the front rack with that tubing on.

Bob
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 01, 2013, 06:59:11 PM
Hi Matt,

A couple of small points, the front mudguards could do with a few spacers to bring the front down and give more clearance for the brake cable. I might be wrong but you won't be able to fit panniers to the front rack with that tubing on.

Bob

Thanks Bob - always good to receive hints and tips.
I will follow your advice re the front guard.

That tubing on the front actually allows me to fit the Ortlieb panniers tight on the front racks.
Without it they were rattling around.
I have Altura on the back and they fitted fine. Strange. But it works now.
Thanks again
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 01, 2013, 07:01:54 PM
Quote
That tubing on the front actually allows me to fit the Ortlieb panniers tight on the front racks. Without it they were rattling around.
I'm guessing you've chosen to fit the Orts without the sizing-adapter spacers in the hooks?

That can be a smart thing to do provided the effective rack diameter is large enough (say, as a result of wrapping). It means there are no adapters to become loose/lost, as has sometimes happened to others in the past.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: bobs on March 01, 2013, 07:36:50 PM
Honestly thought it would have been too thick. Going to do it with mine.

Bob
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 01, 2013, 07:37:33 PM
I'm guessing you've chosen to fit the Orts without the sizing-adapter spacers in the hooks?

That can be a smart thing to do provided the effective rack diameter is large enough (say, as a result of wrapping). It means there are no adapters to become loose/lost, as has sometimes happened to others in the past.

Best,

Dan.

I bought the panniers off eBay and they came without the inner fittings. So the solution was to fit the tubing.
But I like the idea of protecting the racks. And as you say, it makes the bike a bit more personal.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 01, 2013, 07:45:05 PM
Ooh! Pictures!  ;D

Matt,

I think you did a fine job on the bike, and each addition or change personalizes it for your use and makes it that much more "yours". The foam pads on the handlebars look very nice indeed, the mudguards are in place and ready to go, and the rack padding is done.

Pretty soon, everything will be finished and the bike can start accumulating some real distance under you!

My, what a lovely-looking machine; you can be proud!

All the best,

Dan.

Thanks Dan. Unfortunately the rear guard still has to be fitted. I have trouble with the bolts to attach the guard to the frame. Both at the lower stay and the upper stay.
Andy who sold me the bike may have the ones he used but I called SJS and was mega impressed.
I described the problem to the lady who answered the phone and she understood the problem ( not meaning to say that young ladies shouldn't ) and then she passed me to a young man ( at my age most folk I speak to are young!) and Chris ( I think ) listened again as I explained the problem.
He was a bit perplexed at why the bolts shouldn't fit but said he would have a word with the workshop folk and then pop a couple in to post!
I was we'll pleased.
A great example of why Thorn has such a good reputation.

Matt - who is half guarded at the moment.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 01, 2013, 07:46:28 PM
Hi Bob!

The Ortlieb hooks alone are a nominal 16mm. The spacers come in two sizes, one set for racks of ~8mm in diameter, the other for racks of ~10mm. I say "~" because the hooks are about 0.1mm to 0.23mm larger than the intended rack diameter; there's a little "wiggle-room".

Only caution I can offer is to say the success of rack-wrapping depends on the wall thickness of the tubing used and the friction coefficient. I had terrible luck using EDPM fuel-line rubber as it was too sticky and didn't accept or release the hooks very well. The cross-hatch-reinforced clear vinyl-based stuff Matt is using seems to work the best of anything so far. It also looks pretty snazzy with the little cross-hatchings looking kinda high-techy.

Going "wrapped and adapter-free" is nice over the long haul, 'cos with wear and friction, the adapters can become loose in the hooks and can begin to fall out. People have tried all sorts of solutions at that point, from gluing the adapters in with SeamGrip to tying them in with dental floss...none of which seems to work too well, but are viable shorter-term solutions while on a very long or remote tour. Leave the adapters out and wrap the racks, and all those potential problems go away *and* the rack stays pretty and unabraded.

Despite all the advantages I uh, haven't done mine yet. 'Need to get with it.

All the best,

Dan. (...whose usual motto is *not* "Don't do today what you can put off till tomorrow")
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 03, 2013, 07:06:15 PM
Just took Bob's advice and fitted a couple of washers to the front guard and as suggested the brake cable now clears the top.
Many thanks Bob
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 03, 2013, 07:13:34 PM
Still struggling with the rear guard folks :'(

Take a look at my snaps.

I am unable to thread the bolt into the lower stay (may have some new bolts coming from SJS) but the fitting instructions with the Chromoplastic guards suggest using the supplied clip on the lower strut.
I have set it up but the clip does not hold the guard tight.
Does this ever work for anyone or should I stick to trying to bolt the guard directly to the frame?
Thanks folks
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 03, 2013, 07:34:35 PM
Matt,

You're going to have to remove the clips and bolt the mudguards directly to the frame. In the long run, it really is a more secure method, and Thorn have thoughtfully provided the threaded mounts for just that purpose. Also, many of Thorn's bridges are oversized and/or ovalized compared to those on other bikes, so the attached mudguard clips would have a difficult time holding on securely.

You're doing well...just persist to the end and all your hard work and efforts will be rewarded with a secure, rattle-free installation for years to come.

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: rualexander on March 03, 2013, 08:22:07 PM
Until you get the correct bolts, just take the clip off and use a cable tie to hold the mudguard tight in place, make a hole in the mudguard for the cable tie if there isn't one where you remove the clip.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 03, 2013, 08:32:05 PM
Here's how mine looks, Matt...

The number and size of spacers you need will depend on the bike's chainstay length, bridge placement, tire size, desired clearance, etc.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 03, 2013, 08:56:12 PM
Until you get the correct bolts, just take the clip off and use a cable tie to hold the mudguard tight in place, make a hole in the mudguard for the cable tie if there isn't one where you remove the clip.

Great tip. Thanks
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 03, 2013, 08:57:30 PM
Here's how mine looks, Matt...

The number and size of spacers you need will depend on the bike's chainstay length, bridge placement, tire size, desired clearance, etc.

Best,

Dan.

Thanks Dan. Looks good.
Still can't get the supplied bolt to go into the frame.
SJS said they will send me a couple so will report back as progress is made.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 14, 2013, 02:27:15 PM
A bolt out of the blue

I thought I had gone over everything on the Old Bird, but yesterday as I was fitting my new Cat eye Adventure speedo I came across a couple of bolts on the right fork.
see pix
Are they for mounting a light bracket on?

They kinda get on the way of the cable ties but it worked out OK in the end

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on March 14, 2013, 03:12:41 PM
I think they are for mounting a bottle dynamo.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 14, 2013, 05:26:32 PM
I think they are for mounting a bottle dynamo.

Thanks Jim
Reminds of that old joke..
I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal labotomy.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on March 14, 2013, 05:39:32 PM
yes bottle dynamo but you could always move that sensor to other front fork ::)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 14, 2013, 06:18:32 PM
<nods> Yes, the are for a bottle dynamo (SJS Cycles sells various brackets to help make this possible), and...

...sometimes...

...if you're very lucky...and a little clever...and the stars align...

They can also be used to mount the transmitter for some wireless computers.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 14, 2013, 06:41:09 PM
yes bottle dynamo but you could always move that sensor to other front fork ::)

Thanks Jags
Nice lateral thinking. Something I am not too good at.

I just followed orders / the instructions

Cat eye defo said use the right fork and the sensor lines up fine.
I guess some one could give it a try on the left fork but the cable ties "just" went around the studs.

Out for a test run tonight so if it falls off I will take up your advice.
Lets hope I don't have any forking problems with it
 ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on March 14, 2013, 06:59:45 PM
 ;D ;D only winding you u matt its spot on where it is ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 16, 2013, 10:21:26 AM
;D ;D only winding you u matt its spot on where it is ;)
Thanks Jags
I always win first prize in the gulibility stakes. :(
Gave it a test ride last night and nothing fell off. ;)
Still to get my brain around the altimeter bit of the Adventure. I may have bought something over my head!
But it sure looks cool clamped to the extra top bar.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 16, 2013, 10:35:20 AM
Another bit :o
I keep finding new bits on the Old Bird

While fitting the plastic coverings to the front rack I noticed that there are x2 cross top bars.
One I covered and a second one running parallel.

My panniers fit fine on the covered bar but what is that second bar ever used for?

Is it for strengthening the whole thing? If so, I don't recall seeing it on other racks.

Help, assistance, comments and advice appreciated.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andybg on March 16, 2013, 10:59:35 AM
Hi Matt

Yes it is just for strengthening and to get in the way when fiitting and removing bags.

The low riders are fantastically strong for their weight and size and that second bar is the key to their success.

Andy
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 25, 2013, 03:14:01 PM
Picture up date of the Old Bird.
Both guards on on her!
Anyone who can fit front and back without a cuss or 2 wins my prize of a free juggling lesson.
I have never ever spent so long on any task on any bike. ???
But they sure look good now ;D

Pictures taken on my morning 40 miler, Dumfries SW Scotland UK
As you can see, we have had some snow.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andybg on March 25, 2013, 03:20:23 PM
Hi Matt

Bike is looking good and glad you managed to get the mudguards fitted. The last photo looks like you are just getting ready to do some sheep russling!!!!

Andy
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: rualexander on March 25, 2013, 04:42:42 PM

While fitting the plastic coverings to the front rack I noticed that there are x2 cross top bars.
One I covered and a second one running parallel.

My panniers fit fine on the covered bar but what is that second bar ever used for?

Is it for strengthening the whole thing? If so, I don't recall seeing it on other racks.

Help, assistance, comments and advice appreciated.

Matt

Because there is no hoop over the wheel to the other side, racks such as these need the second bar to brace the main part of the rack so that there is no danger of it twisting under load and getting caught in the spokes of your front wheel and causing a severe accident.
There are some cheap racks around without these bracing spars or a bracing hoop to the other side, and they should be avoided.
See this thread on the CTC forum http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=52885
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 25, 2013, 05:11:07 PM
Hi Matt!

The Old Bird is looking robust and ready for anything -- so are you, for that matter!

A definitive Thorn Adventure Bike.

My goodness, I do so wish I could do something to ease the weather for the UK, Ireland, Western and Eastern Europe. You surely did well to get out and into it. For my money, 40 miles in snow is the equivalent of more in the dry, depending on how soft the snow is. It can really sap strength.

So, Matt, what's next for the bike? It looks wonderful already! Maybe what it needs (and you have in mind) is a good long tour!

Lookin' fine!

Best,

Dan. (...who is glad the sheep in the background of your photo have not yet had their shearing)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 25, 2013, 05:13:43 PM
Because there is no hoop over the wheel to the other side, racks such as these need the second bar to brace the main part of the rack so that there is no danger of it twisting under load and getting caught in the spokes of your front wheel and causing a severe accident.
There are some cheap racks around without these bracing spars or a bracing hoop to the other side, and they should be avoided.
See this thread on the CTC forum http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=52885

Ah ha. I always wondered what those hoops were for over some of the racks. Now I know!
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: StuntPilot on March 25, 2013, 08:38:53 PM
Great shots Matt! Not as much drifting at the bottom of Ettrick (have not been up the valley). Being 'between' East and West as far as weather is concerned in the Borders, we get both weather systems, or none. We are the meat in the sandwich as the local butcher says, but then he would!

The old bird is looking good in the severe conditions. That is what Thorns excel at is it not? I love the picture of your saddle with the 'snow dunes' in the background.

Good to see someone else is using the reinforced rack tubing!
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 25, 2013, 08:53:40 PM
Thanks for comments on pictures.
Yep, the Brooks looks good.
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: E-wan on March 26, 2013, 06:48:52 PM
Good to see someone else is using the reinforced rack tubing!

I am intreagued.  Is there a thread on this somware, and how ware would you source it and will ortalieb pannier hooks fit it?

Thanks

Ewan
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 26, 2013, 07:15:37 PM
Quote
Is there a thread on this somware...
Yep! Starting here: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=4290.0
Quote
how ware would you source it
Richard's details here: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=4290.msg20452#msg20452
Quote
will ortalieb pannier hooks fit it?
Ortlieb hooks fit fine without use of the hook inserts, provided you get the right tubing kind/diameter (16mm or slightly less).

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 26, 2013, 09:15:08 PM
I am intreagued.  Is there a thread on this somware, and how ware would you source it and will ortalieb pannier hooks fit it?

Thanks

Ewan
I fitted the tubing to protect the rack ( front and back) ((Thorn racks)). I use altura rear panniers and Ortlieb front.
When I came to fit the front panniers I found that the hooks only fitted with the tubing on!
I had bought the panniers second hand so maybe there had been sizing hooks for adaption.

I like the look now and also see the tubing as somewhere to hide cash as a fall back measure when on tour.
Lots of thoughts on this issue but having some money spread out can't be too bad a thing.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 12, 2013, 09:40:58 AM
Just a tester to see if I can load a picture in the middle of a paragraph.
https://plus.google.com/photos/106065275166342132380/albums/5861999555599776081?banner=pwa
Did it work?
If not, please help.
Matt. Who hopes to be put in the picture.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: julk on April 12, 2013, 10:54:02 AM
Matt,
The link shows up but has to be clicked to open the photo page.
Have you tried the additional options/attach choose file features of a reply?
That works for me as long as the photo is within the size limits stated.
Julian
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 12, 2013, 01:51:14 PM
Thanks for the hint.
I wanted the picture to appear within the text.
I have attached pictures before but they appear after the text
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on April 12, 2013, 02:37:23 PM
Hi Matt!

I have written a little tutorial on photo-posts here, both as attachments (below the text) as well as in the text (using image URLs HTML tags): http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=4313.0

Rather than linking the page, you'll need to link the URL of the image. The steps vary a bit depending on your browser and OS, but typically, you can right-click the image (if on a PC) and choose an option that will read something like "Copy Image URL". That's what you want to get.

Then, when composing a message, click on the "Insert Image" icon in the row just above the emoticons (smileys). It is the button second from left (hover your mouse over it and the label will appear). The image URL goes between the brackets -- same way you'd modify text with an underline or italics.

The image should appear in your text, like so:
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-zRpeRDnEnxc/UVoCF5j8tlI/AAAAAAAAAFU/7kwWf48F5cs/s772/image.jpg)
So long as you keep the same image host, your photo will appear. Change, and the photo will be replaced with an "Image not found" icon. When the photos appear below the text (as attachments), they're stored (hosted) in a special place on Thorn's server, rather than off-site, and will remain available unless/until you decide to remove them. Attached photos can only be seen by registered members, while those appearing in the body of the post can be viewed by anyone.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 12, 2013, 04:26:31 PM
Many thanks Dan.
Out tomorrow for a run so will take a few snaps and try again.
BTW, does my chain look a bit slack?
Thanks
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on April 12, 2013, 04:38:02 PM
Quote
...does my chain look a bit slack?
Mmmyeah, but only compared to freshly adjusted. Matt, the Thorn Rohloff chains can be run fairly slack and running slack sure beats running too tight (which can cause excess wear). Some Forum members have only adjusted theirs after the chain begins to fall off.

So, yes, compared to a freshly-adjusted chain it does look a bit slack. In the range of allowable chain tautness, it looks fine!

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 12, 2013, 05:56:07 PM
Thanks again Dan
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-cBKGe9WwWTI/UWg7IX_H8rI/AAAAAAAAAG8/b_JkkJ01dCg/s432/march2013ride+006.jpg)
I have yet to fiddle around under my Old Bird but am eager to dabble with the adjustable double big screws I can see.
If I turn the Old bird upside down and slacken the x2 screws, which way do I nudge the bottom bracket to take up the sack?
Maybe it will be obvious but any hints and tips always well received.
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on April 12, 2013, 06:15:46 PM
Hi Matt!

Your picture-post worked great; well done!

Typically, you'll want to tip the skinny part of the eccentric (at the top) forward. It will be obvious when you get into it. Complete instructions are here:
http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/thornpdf/ThornBikeOwnerManual2Web.pdf page 9.

For more on how tight to get the chain, see: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=5569.0

A search for "chain tension" and "eccentric" and "ebb" will pull up all you need.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 14, 2013, 01:38:36 PM
Out for my usual Saturday afternoon run. 34 miles around the sunny lanes of South West Scotlandshire
 ;)
I took delivery on Thursday of my Topeak bottle carrier and was looking forward to trying it out. I had read mixed reviews of its strength in as much as on reviewer said t did not old the bottle straight but slipped under the weight.
I fixed it to my T bar with the supplied rubber sleeve to protect the bar from the metal tightener.
Bit tricky but that was down to me having taken one of my slow pills. ;)
First impressions....
Being on the T bar right in front of me caused me concern since I though I might hit it with my right knee on the upstroke of a pedal.
Also, the top of he bottle was higher than I had anticipated
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-niDe95sV1zk/UWmK14Wsf6I/AAAAAAAAAJ4/9xAbO4XWQ0M/w574-h428-p-o/april2013+001.jpg)

Proof of the puddling, as they say.....
First problem was that I had erred too much with caution in tightening the retainnig bolt, resluting in the occasional slippage of the bottle towards me.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-GMj4UvfHwWY/UWmKCzg-FbI/AAAAAAAAAI8/PvNzGEH9qEk/w550-h409-p-o/april2013+004.jpg)
Here is a better picture side on. This shows the height issue.
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-yt5YwACtfY4/UWmKKO7mEzI/AAAAAAAAAJU/An9XFOlHh7c/w549-h409-p-o/april2013+002.jpg)

At the end of my run,(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-4cavuNp_SJE/UWmKGBKidXI/AAAAAAAAAJM/aDahpCbCty0/w550-h409-p-o/april2013+006.jpg) I was able to evaluate the whole set up.

Nice to have a bottle so near to hand, and no issues with knee/pedal or bottle movement.

One last picture looking back towards seat.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-flEvXHPqvJg/UWmKiKf5VrI/AAAAAAAAAJs/HEAY82h5CLw/w550-h409-p-o/april2013+003.jpg)

I see Dan has his bottles mounted forward of the bars. A better set up but not sure I have that option unless I use a forward mounted T bar and attach my bar bag to it.

One last picture of my Thorn against a thorn tree.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-DOu7GKR703Q/UWmKEhMTaXI/AAAAAAAAAJE/qax24EcGhYM/w549-h409-p-o/april2013+005.jpg)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: moodymac on April 14, 2013, 04:35:38 PM
Matt,

I don't have any ideas of solving your bottle location, but the old bird is sure looking good! 8)

Tom
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on April 14, 2013, 05:01:23 PM
Hi Matt!

My, the Old Bird (which almost seems disrespectful for such a fine and new-looking bike!) looks wonderful.

Isn't it fun to experiment with new setups? A great way to tailor the bike just for you.

Yes, it is really handy having a bottle so ready to hand (or mouth, if one fits a straw).
Quote
I see Dan has his bottles mounted forward of the bars.
No, Matt, mine are just behind the handlebars, attached inline with the steerer so no clearance issues with the handlebar bag. Though I have a "M" (590M) frame, my knees still clear nicely even when out of the saddle. Co-locating the bottles with the steerer axis will have the least effect on handling.

If you need to lower the bottle, a short length of alu with two holes and a couple more nuts and bolts will do the trick, allowing it to ride lower on the Topeak bracket if you wish.

Really enjoying your photos; best wishes for many more happy miles ahead!

Dan. (...who thinks you have some picturesque countryside in which to ride and wants to see more)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 14, 2013, 06:21:22 PM
Many thanks Dan, & co. for compliments.Half way around my ride I stopped off at my usual spot for a coffee and Chelsea bun.
I realised that a local bike club had just finished their run at the same spot and there were quite a few riders hanging around. All Lycra clad, carbon-heads. My mind raced back to the years when I could have fitted in,so a slight tinge of envy was hanging in the air.

I was well pleased when three of the guys stopped as they walked past and complimented me on the Raven.
They recognised the hub and asked questions about drag and gear ratio. They also noted the Axa lock and asked why I was also carrying a second lock. ( I had forgotten to remove it before leaving home but I was tempted to say it was because of the bikes value and I am a belt and braces man )
They also noticed a slight rust ring on the seat post where I had raised the saddle height.
So I was embarrassed by the fau pass and removed it as soon as I returned home.

One of the guys had been down to Thorn in Somerset and met Robert. It was 11 years ago so he imagined the set up had moved on from the rabbit warren of buildings out the back. But spoke very well of the whole business.
As they left, they asked if I was planning a long trip, and I said Turkey. One guy said. "We'll, that will get you there and back."
I hope he's right. ::)

So I was one happy bunny at all the attention received.
Is pride a sin?

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 27, 2013, 05:42:21 PM
Todays run was 31 miles around the sunny lanes of South West Scotlandshire.
It was my usual route but for the first time I realised how many bridges I crossed.
Out came the camera and here we go.
Not quite the Bridges of Madison County......
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-jN5xvKXiIX0/UXv7V-DhSdI/AAAAAAAAALY/Ttfw-8x2aks/w549-h409-p-o/bridges+001.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-L8ppKHOh20k/UXv7e_IqN_I/AAAAAAAAALg/xIO0ZceMYQc/w613-h457/bridges+003.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-cEy1oxiOWTc/UXv7yac0lxI/AAAAAAAAALw/GlBYPU8VrzY/w613-h457/bridges+006.jpg)
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-y--QTJUALds/UXv76MrPjnI/AAAAAAAAAL8/YA2Txvb8JZE/w613-h457/bridges+008.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-oNbH4sYPwCY/UXv8RpO6URI/AAAAAAAAAME/DUZf2CNHXtY/w613-h457/bridges+010.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-gxdszFEL9n8/UXv8YG2tTTI/AAAAAAAAAMM/24zi5M6-gJY/w613-h457/bridges+012.jpg)
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-odtZUx7S4Zs/UXv8qLdjeOI/AAAAAAAAAMU/ZeCBXyLcnIE/w613-h457/bridges+013.jpg)

Matt - maybe a bridge too far?
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on April 27, 2013, 06:00:14 PM
Oh, this is terrific, Matt!

One of the real Forum treats for me is seeing what it is like where others ride. Nearly any local route can soon become routine when you see it daily, but when seen from afar, it is exotic and wonderful (as in this case).

Wow! Bridges! Made of stone!

The ones 'round here are steel or wood, as in covered bridges (the roofs make them look like little houses vehicles drive through...the idea being the roof protects the wooden deck timbers from weather). From 'way over here in the NW corner of 'Merka, your locale looks like wonderful countryside for cycling, Matt! The closest I've been is playing Colin McRae and Richard Burns rally games on the PC, and then the countryside is mostly a blur unless I find the corner of a stone bridge whilst drifting sideways out of a corner. "They" modeled your reality well from the games -- the two look very similar!  ;D

(Bike looks great too!)

Best,

Dan. (...who would be a "real" WRC driver if his wishes were granted)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on June 16, 2013, 08:14:09 PM
Got to thinking about my front wheel and the Son dynamo.
I have followed all the postings about charging gizmo's and lights and have finally concluded its not for me and my planned tour.
I can well see the advantages but will be happier with less to be concerned about while on the road.

Here's my dilemma. Do I sell on the dynamo with Andre CSS rims, less that 2,000 miles, and buy a new wheel from SJS?
Will I be saving much weight? Is there a market for the dynamo and wheel? Am I wearing out the dynamo by keeping it on the bike? I know the drag is minimal, it's more the additional wear to the dynamo.

Thoughts as ever much appreciated folks.

Matt

Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on June 16, 2013, 08:22:15 PM
Hi Matt!
Quote
Here's my dilemma. Do I sell on the dynamo with Andre CSS rims, less that 2,000 miles, and buy a new wheel from SJS?
You could...but the sale of the used SON wheel might not leave much left over after paying for a new (non-dyno) wheel to be built.
Quote
Will I be saving much weight?
Yes, some, but not where it matters. The weight of the SON is in the middle of the wheel, where the rotating weight is virtually unnoticeable.
Quote
Is there a market for the dynamo and wheel?
Yes! Assuredly!...but not at new prices. Figure about half at worst.
Quote
Am I wearing out the dynamo by keeping it on the bike?
No. Just the bearings are seeing wear, but only at the same rate as any other high-quality hub with shielded cartridge bearings. Perhaps even less, 'cos of the pressure-compensation vent that prevents moisture from being drawn into the bearings. Meanwhile, you have a nice, maintenance-free hub even if you never use it for its intended purpose. It will also (and very simply and reliably) power just your lights if you wish. It needn't also charge gadgets if you don't want to fuss with setting that up.
Quote
I know the drag is minimal, it's more the additional wear to the dynamo.
Nope; when it isn't producing electricity under load...it is just wheeling along. Yes, there are some eddy currents, but essentially no wear 'cos the internal components are non-contact.

Hope this helps, Matt. Me? I'd be inclined to keep it for awhile. Your needs might change with more extended touring use, and then you'd be ready to meet them, whether that means powering lights at night or charging gadgets...or both. The lighting part is always easy. It is the gadget charging that can become complicated depending on what you need to charge and its electrical demands. Meantime, you've already got an awfully nice hub that will be fuss-free for many, many years.

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on June 16, 2013, 08:49:32 PM
Matt great pic's your countryside is a lot like ours i only crossed 1 stone bridge on my spin today should have got th camera out ah well maybe next time.

for god sake dont sell your wheel you will loose a bundle on it besides come winter you will need it. ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: rualexander on June 16, 2013, 08:53:08 PM
With the tour I believe you have planned, to Asia and beyond (?), I think you would be best to keep the dynamo and a decent front light at least.
You never know on these sort of tours when you might be caught out with the light fading and nowhere immediately near at hand to bed down for the night.
Or even for use during the daytime, heavy rain, fog, mist, or even tunnels.
No doubt you will be carrying a decent head torch which could be used in these circumstances but a dynamo light will be much better.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on June 17, 2013, 01:21:46 PM
Many thanks chaps

The Son stays.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird has moved
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on July 05, 2013, 10:02:22 PM
Matts Old Bird has moved.
We have relocated from Dumfries, South west Scotland to Inverurie near Aberdeen.
Semi retired now. That means I don't want to work and Mrs. Matt insists I find a job.  :'(

I would be very pleased to meet up with any Thorn owners nearby.
Especially if they can offer me a job.  :o
( just kidding )
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on July 05, 2013, 10:16:54 PM
Congratulations, Matt, on your semi-retirement and relocation to Inverurie!

Hope you'll get lots of riding in. Did you mention to your wife that you're now the Greater Aberdeen at-large field sales representative for Thorn (leaving out the part about how it is accomplished by word of mouth reviews of your own while riding with others)?

All the best,

Dan. (...Spin Doctor, who says it's all in the phrasing)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on August 16, 2013, 08:46:32 PM
Had a nice 95 mile run today. South from Inverurie just outside Aberdeen UK.
Good weather, considerate traffic and 1,500 foot hill to test gears 1 & 2.
Only issue ithas was with the ? bolt ? on the head steerer. Not sure of the correct description but hopefully the attached photo will show it. I filled a brass bell a few moths ago and now there is rust in the socket for the Allen key.
What did I do wrong and what can I do to remove the rust and prevent it returning.

Matt

Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: rualexander on August 16, 2013, 08:50:54 PM
Stem cap bolt? These usually start to rust a bit, perfectly normal in our climate.
You'd need to get one made of something else if you don't like the look of a bit of superficial rust.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on August 16, 2013, 08:52:00 PM
just surface rust i reckon fit a stainless nut.
man that was a super spin 95 miles is a hell of a journey on a bike 8) respect.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on August 16, 2013, 10:16:26 PM
Thanks Jags. I usually do a long one each weekend.
Last week was from home, Inverurie to Bamff and Fraserborgh  and the week before up to Peterhead. Each trip about 90 miles.
I read somewhere that the Raven and Nomads were not recommended for LEJOG but I can sit on mine all day. Granted I just take a bar bag and x3 water bottles; no panniers of course.
Brooks saddle and I am set for the day. Up and way by 7.30 am, home by 6 pm.
Perfect day.
Apart from that rusty stem cap bolt!
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on August 16, 2013, 11:24:54 PM
excellent cycling matt the most i've done this year was 55miles or there abouts, gonna have to get  my arse back in the saddle for some serious miles. my sherpa is an all day bike as well not done any audax rides yes but i might give it a go  next year on the raleigh.mind you  having said that my average speed on both bikes is about the same 13 to14mph i'm happy enough at that.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dahGaL6ehjc&list=UU72nZ26ikgDQVdt90ENBmXg&index=29.
not sure if you've ever seen this video matt but its a pure gem its to me what cycling is all about.
it's the kinda spins i do when the miles are in the legs, i take my wee stove but only for the to boil the kettle for a cuppa i'm probably the worst cook on the planet ::) but yeah the idea of stopping and getting the pan on is pure heaven. ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on August 16, 2013, 11:28:08 PM
Hi Matt!

A number of new bikes come from the Far East equipped with dome-shaped rubber plugs for the stem caps. Many bike shops discard them during assembly and either toss them in the trash or in the "spares" box (one of my local shops calls this their "Anxiety Box" -- a catch-all to raid when something needs to be made to fit). A quick check at your LBS would likely turn one up.

Sadly and despite chasing them to the ends of the Internet, I have not found a ready, reliable source for these OEM plugs.

I got tired of asking and waiting for them to come available and bought a number from a vendor on AliBaba based in Xiamon, China about five years ago. Though they're no longer listed, I grabbed some at the time in 5mm and 6mm and promptly put them on Sherpa then the Nomad as a way to keep dry lake playa dust out of the allen bolt sockets. The dust settles in cavities, then concretizes when it gets wet, making it is horrible to remove and chip out so you can get an an allen key in for service. You can see photos of them in my cranksets, pedal spindle sockets, brake bolts, etc. in my Danneaux's Sherpa and Danneaux's Nomad galleries or directly here:
http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=3896.0;attach=1036
http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4523.0;attach=2077
http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4523.0;attach=2423

The reason why these bolt sockets rust is during the plating process, the chrome builds up on convex surfaces but not so much on concave ones. Given there's not much plating in the socket wells and they hold water, it is no surprise they rust. The ultimate solution is to replace the bolts with stainless-steel button-head or cylinder-head versions, and/or find and install those little rubber caps.

As for removing the rust, a bit of metal polish on the end of a cotton swab can do wonders. My favorite metal polish is ammonia-based Blue Magic 'cos it leave a protective silicone coating behind to prevent rust recurring, but Simichrome, Flitz, or others can work just as well.

Congratulations on the 95-miler, Matt -- Good on ya! Terrific to hear you're getting out and about on the Old Bird!

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 16, 2013, 10:19:32 AM
New camera delivered at the weekend so here's the first snap showing my Old Bird.
Took a run into Aberdeen from home. 21 miles each way, some of it along a bike path so no traffic problems.
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-oQcgchWKKYM/Ul2bLbEA0zI/AAAAAAAAAT8/JGuRzPRslMs/w640-h480-no/13+-+2)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 16, 2013, 10:50:55 AM
A couple of more snaps from my day out.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-iF3mdo9ZAvw/Ul5bp2zPMqI/AAAAAAAAAUk/rSuw9IjhSBY/w958-h719-no/P1000049.JPG)
Statue of the Gordon Highlands unveiled by Prince Charles on 11th October 2011

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-FS6pLV0GPFQ/Ul5c2wBOzAI/AAAAAAAAAVU/ti4v4pmw4Mk/w958-h719-no/P1000065.JPG)
In Dyce park on the way home. Autumn arrives earlier here in this part of the UK

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 26, 2013, 07:32:11 PM
A day at the seaside.
Carefull not to get the old bird wet. And watched out for sand on the chain.
But we both enjoyed the fresh air and ozone.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on October 26, 2013, 07:35:23 PM
That new camera was a good investment, Matt. Thanks for this latest; a very nice scene, indeed!

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on October 26, 2013, 07:46:40 PM
great stuff Matt what camera did you get ;)

BTW don't let sand into any moving parts right bugger to get out.
anymore photos I'll happly  view them all. ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 26, 2013, 10:13:54 PM
Thanks Jags.
In the past 2 years I have lost 2 cameras. All my own fault.
So for the third effort decided to go for a cheap n cheerful one.
Really wanted something I could play about with apature film speed and exposure wise. But set myself a limit on cost v what I could loose!

Decided on a Panasonic Lumix DMC-F5 Black + case + 8Gb card. eBay £71.99 inc.postage.

Still getting to grips with it although there isn't too much to tweak.

Quite pleased with the focus and definition. Nice n compact. Easy to fit into the bar bag.
Ticks all the boxes so far.

Almost went for a Nikon Coolpix but wallet stayed shut!

More pix to follow.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on October 26, 2013, 11:06:35 PM
cheers matt those photos look good to me ;)
Title: Now you see it.... now you don't
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on November 30, 2013, 09:06:10 PM
Last month Dan kindly sent me a few small rubber bungs for the handle bar stem bolt on my Raven.
Today I managed before and after pictures.
What a great improvement.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-RdsjocbbzpY/UporXn1MJeI/AAAAAAAAAlM/z18KOOF9bA0/w958-h719-no/Raven+002.jpg)

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-1-_uCoq5SeE/UporglBsQzI/AAAAAAAAAlU/_XCE2WB6pRo/w958-h719-no/Raven+003.jpg)

Its the small things in life that sometimes make the biggest difference.

Cheers Dan.
There's a cold one waiting for you here in Scotland
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on November 30, 2013, 09:21:23 PM
You're very welcome, Matt!

My, what a terrific positive difference for such a little thing.

Terrific photos with the new camera, too -- well done, Matt!

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on November 30, 2013, 10:30:49 PM
say Dan you never sent me anything in a while :'(

anymore photos matt  8)
Title: Yesterdays ride
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 10, 2014, 02:35:47 PM
Out on my usual run from Inverurie to Aberdeen harbor.
Recent rough storms ( not on the USA scale!) had deposited plenty of sand onto the broad-walk / esplanade.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-p2chAgcAgp8/Us6wCDwSlHI/AAAAAAAAAx4/sI17H-o9bBs/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140109_122232.jpg)
Tide was out at time of picture but you can see my Old Bird standing in sand thrown up from the beach.

Had my sandwiches there and chatted to a fellow my age on a Dawes tourer.
Didn't catch his name but he had been up North to John o Groats recently so knew one end of a bike from the other.
He asked about my Rohloff and appeared impressed.

On the way home I pulled over to chat with a couple on a tandem.
I had passed them earlier in the day and first thing I noticed was the Thorn badge on the front of their frame.
Terry and Pat from a few miles from where I live!
Amazing.
They had done the LEJOG last year so we chatted about this and that.
They had had a bad experience with the seals on the Rohloff but good service from SJS and Rohloff when it went back to Germany.
Apparently there is only so much that can be done to seals? If a big problem - then back to Germany.
Here they are.
(I asked if I could post their picture.)
They hadn't heard of this site so I was pleased to inform them of how useful and fun it is.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/YAP7ykdqv1zARhEBvFR91LzL29yhpRUeUYSwXKliJLY=w958-h719-no)

So a very good day indeed.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on January 10, 2014, 03:31:03 PM
Thats a brilliant photo Matt  the joys of cycling.
matt just a thought on your barbag,why not turn the stem unside down so as the top of bag would be just below the handlebars ,much better for your lights.
just a though either way bike looks great.

jags.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 10, 2014, 04:40:29 PM
Many thanks Jags
Always like to receive advice on improving my set up
Here are a couple of shots taken a few mins ago.

Are you suggesting I set the stem in a downwards direction?

This will involve removing the cap cover and the rings?
In order to maintain the handlebar height I would ned less rings above the stem than at present?

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-dox6q7iI0hY/UtASL29iIdI/AAAAAAAAA2M/6xaeBW4YAEs/w958-h719-no/bikejan2014c+001.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-Lyq_IcnUYvY/UtAR9czCvkI/AAAAAAAAA2E/SAbEBRBPIxQ/w958-h719-no/bikejan2014c+001.jpg)

I think there are 11 rings above the stem now.
Will they come off easily when the cap bolt is removed?

Thanks again
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on January 10, 2014, 06:43:08 PM
If I understand what Jags is getting to, it's trying to get your bag lower so it doesn't block your headlight. With the bag fixed to the bar, if you don't change the height of the bar, then your bag isn't going anywhere either. Of course it would be upside down priorities to change the height of the bar just to make lights or bar bags work better!

The way you have that light mounted now looks quite clever! It's on your handlebar at the end of it? I've never seen that before!

Seems like your auxiliary bar is underutilized. If you like what you have, why change? But my suggestion would be... you could move that auxiliary bar to below the handlebar. Maybe you'd have to flip both stems to get it all to fit well but no big deal. Then mount your bar bag to the auxiliary bar. With the auxiliary bar angled downward, you might have the bars high enough above it so the light would clear it when the light is mounted more conventionally. The computer could go on the bar too.

But really, the way you have that light now looks quite effective! If you don't mind the loss of the  hand grip possibility there, why change!
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on January 10, 2014, 06:48:57 PM
but yes if you pull off that top cap then the rings are free to slide off and the bars just need to be loosened a bit and they come right off too. They make 1 cm wide spacers if you'd rather get the job done with fewer but I don't think it matters outside of aesthetics and your set-up looks fine anyway.

It's a little more finicky putting things back together. Just slide things on the way you want but don't tighten the bars at first. Get the top cap back on and slowly tighten it until there is no more play in the head bearings. There are probably many mystical teachings on an eighth of a turn this way or that, bearings being bearings. But once you have the bearings moving just so, then you tighten the bolts on the bars to fix them in place.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 10, 2014, 07:02:25 PM
Thanks Jags. I am away from home until Monday but will take a closer look at your suggestions. By having the light on the handlebar I do use one hand position.
I usually have my cateye speedo on the  T bar and that still leaves a space there.
But the present position of the bar bag stops me putting the light on the other side of the T bar.
I'm never too old to try something new and as you say, I can always put it back to the old way.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: rualexander on January 10, 2014, 07:17:49 PM
.... They make 1 cm wide spacers if you'd rather get the job done with fewer but I don't think it matters outside of aesthetics and your set-up looks fine anyway.
....


Spacers can now be had in larger depths, 24mm and 48mm also available from SJS. http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/thorn-alloy-headset-spacer-w-internal-bore-1-1-8-inch-prod27562/
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on January 10, 2014, 07:24:52 PM
Here is another gadget you could use to raise your light if you want to regain that gripping spot on your handlebars:

http://www.topeak.com/products/xtras/barxtender
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 10, 2014, 07:47:04 PM
Nice idea.
I have their extra bottle cage mount that I use on the T bar in the summer.
I'll give this some thought.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: John Saxby on January 11, 2014, 03:58:14 PM
Quote
you can see my Old Bird standing in sand thrown up from the beach.

Just love that photo, Matt!
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Chris M on January 11, 2014, 06:18:45 PM
Looks like a great area to be cycling in Matt, the bike looks the business as well.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 13, 2014, 10:45:46 AM
Thanks Chris & John.
Yes, a nice looking bike indeed.

Any thoughts on what to do with the hole in the forks?
I don't plan to fit a light there. I guess that's what it's for?

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-Cf0_YryjsGU/Us6v5Um-j7I/AAAAAAAAAxU/QGzVkFnAH_Y/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140109_122057.jpg)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on January 13, 2014, 05:21:13 PM
Quote
Any thoughts on what to do with the hole in the forks?
Either a 5mm stainless-steel bolt or one of those little black rubber plugs would full it nicely.
Quote
I don't plan to fit a light there. I guess that's what it's for?
Yep.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 16, 2014, 08:28:50 PM
Another day at the beach.
Semi retired life can be tough at times! ;)

Today's ride coincided with another high tide. Quite a bit of the sand deposited on the Esplanade /  broad-walk had gone but a few spots were still too deep to ride through.

Waves were high and a couple of brave folk were out surfing.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-yZYXD_ij2Lk/UtfSvEFoldI/AAAAAAAAA_w/7on11B9xet8/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140116_123658.jpg)

New tube bag fitted underneath the saddle. Carries a tube and multi-tool and thin gloves.
Bar-bag has tire levers pump and patch kit.

What do other folk carry and where on the bike? 20 mile rides - from home to home in a day - not full touring.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-wK9DDJy2-LE/UtfVvM4yshI/AAAAAAAABAM/ifykGjbGc3Q/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140116_124953.jpg)

Rubber band on the bar? Using an Altura bar-bag. Closes by friction but pops off over rough ground. I threaded a thin bamboo 8 inch rod through the loops on the bar bag lid. Then the rubber band slips around one end and keeps things shut tight. Easy enough to slip off when required.

Anyone else use rubber bands? I never travel without a couple. 101 uses.  :D

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-AMaDh2HI3Bg/UtfSlRmem9I/AAAAAAAAA_k/XnKVOZdcBhk/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140116_123611.jpg)

Must polish that bell. ???

All the best folks

Matt


Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: in4 on January 16, 2014, 08:35:24 PM
Great photos Matt and brilliant weather for a seaside jaunt. What is that pink object underneath your saddle?
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 16, 2014, 09:16:10 PM
My new tube bag. Holds a spare tube, multi tool and thin latex gloves
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on January 16, 2014, 09:49:41 PM
Quote
What do other folk carry and where on the bike? 20 mile rides - from home to home in a day - not full touring.
Hi Matt! My, you're getting some outstanding photos; thanks so much for sharing them on the Forum.

As for the contents of my Nomad's underseat bag, here's the list...
• Spare tube
• Glued and glueless patch kits. I prefer glued, but sometimes the glue has dried out or I need to go in a hurry, so....
• Thorn eccentric tool.
• Multi-tool
• 2pr nitrile gloves
• Schwalbe tire pressure gauge

Same thing I carry on full tours so I don't have to dig through the panniers for the full kit when usually all I need is the stuff for common repairs.

Your new underseat bag looks very good, Matt.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 16, 2014, 10:08:12 PM
Thanks Dan.
The under seat bag is a little on the small side.
Bought it half price in lbs. I'm a sucker for a bargin.
I can't fit tire levers in. But then I carry my pump in the bar bag.
Thorn eccentric tool?
Wassat?
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on January 16, 2014, 10:19:23 PM
Quote
Thorn eccentric tool?
Wassat?
Hi Matt! It is a smallish and very handy/potentially vital tool included with each new complete Thorn bicycle. They come in several flavors, depending on model/Rohloff gearbox configuration (internal vs. external) and whether your bike has S&S couplings or not. See this page: http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/find.asp?site=&name=thorn%20eccentric&page=1&geoc=US

Mine looks like this: http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/thorn-3-in-1-bottom-bracket-eccentric-tool-for-73-mm-shell-raven-bikes-prod12076/?geoc=us Includes a fixed pin wrench for turning the BB eccentric, a 15mm spanner for the BB securing bolts or pedals, and an 8mm box wrench for manually shifting an EX gearbox should the cable(s) break.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Chris M on January 16, 2014, 10:28:36 PM
Blue skies and surfers in Scotland! That semi-retirement certainly does look tough Matt, you have my pity ;D Great shots again.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 16, 2014, 11:01:05 PM
Thanks Chris.
I still have to pinch myself when I am out and about instead of working.

Thanks for the tip Dan.
I'll see what's left in the kitty and maybe treat myself.

Typing that  word "kitty" reminded me of a joke I heard earlier in the week.
Two kittens on a roof.
Which one sides off first?
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on January 16, 2014, 11:06:51 PM
i give in which one. ::)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 16, 2014, 11:14:25 PM
Too quick Jags.
I should make you wait.
But since it's you.....

Its the one with the smallest mu.

Geddit??
 :D
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on January 17, 2014, 12:04:07 AM
Your mental  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on January 18, 2014, 03:18:53 PM
Which brooks is that Matt?  The patina is beautiful.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 18, 2014, 03:32:30 PM
Thanks geo.
The saddle came with the bike last year.
A B17 believe. Been around the block a few times by the look of the brass tag o. The back. Its all most off.
But the fit is fine.
Patina?
Wassat? New word to me.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on January 18, 2014, 03:47:01 PM

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patina
Patina is a tarnish that forms on the surface of copper, bronze and similar metals ( produced by oxidation or other chemical processes); stone; a sheen on ...
?Etymology - ?Acquired patina - ?Applied patina - ?Repatination

I was using it loosely to apply both to the copper rivets and the colour of the leather.  I think it's a B17 special, not your standard b17.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: John Saxby on January 18, 2014, 04:00:36 PM
Quote
I think it's a B17 special

Matt, geo -- looks like my B17 Champion Special in the foto below.  I pat it now & then, esp in the bleak mid-wintertime.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 18, 2014, 04:21:48 PM
Yep, looks like mine.
In better condition tho'  ???
What do you rub into it?

Can't lay my paws on a picture of mine, at the moment
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 18, 2014, 04:31:34 PM
Just found some.
Well, it's peeing down outside here in Aberdeenshire - what else is there to do but sort through the hard drive for snaps?

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-euEg6Y3zKQI/Utqc2zM_62I/AAAAAAAABC8/5ECnxZrBjtc/w772-h576-no/march2013ride+005.jpg)

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-PkLI013lPlo/UtqdAOw47wI/AAAAAAAABDM/4c710fF9AZc/w772-h576-no/march2013ride+003.jpg)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-OOyqgVjOM2k/Utqc6u5rkXI/AAAAAAAABDE/e7pF8Qqeapc/w772-h576-no/march2013ride+002.jpg)

What makes you think it is a 'special' ?
I'm not up to speed on the types of B17

Thanks Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on January 18, 2014, 04:48:43 PM
on my sherpa the champion special has copper rivets and rails.
matt you need to proofhide it .the way i do it ,smeer it on with fingers  rubbing it well into leather underneath as well, leave it on overnight and polist off next morn last 6 months no problem, dont rub off the proof hide from under the saddle and always carry a plastic bag for cover when you pop in for a coffee stop you need something warm riding in those conditions.

jags.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on January 18, 2014, 04:58:36 PM
Thanks Jags.
I must admit to being lazy re the proof hiding
Now you have told me - I will buy something next week.
may I ask what you use?

I am good at keeping the saddle covered and have a neat seat cover that velcros under the cross bar and comes with me whenever out in doubtful weather.

Pictures were taken last winter.
Not usually a fan of riding in those conditions but I had recently bought the bike and just had to get out on it.
 ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on January 18, 2014, 05:01:40 PM
on my sherpa the champion special has copper rivets and rails.
matt you need to proofhide it .the way i do it ,smeer it on with fingers  rubbing it well into leather underneath as well, leave it on overnight and polist off next morn last 6 months no problem, dont rub off the proof hide from under the saddle and always carry a plastic bag for cover when you pop in for a coffee stop you need something warm riding in those conditions.

jags.

Yes, that's what I do. I try and apply proof hide on warm days so it absorbs more deeply. Proofhide is a special brooks potion made from mashed up earwax of the Siberian tiger....  Seriously, best to buy the official brooks product, it's good and lasts years.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Relayer on January 18, 2014, 05:12:29 PM
Proofide at SJSC

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/brooks-proofide-leather-saddle-conditioner-40g-tin-prod795/

Well worth it for the way a Brooks looks after one's butt.   ;)

Jim
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: John Saxby on January 18, 2014, 06:00:08 PM
Matt,

Good for you for venturing out on your Raven in such conditions!  Now I understand why my grandfather, one R Burns by name, left Aberdeenshire for London, a century or so ago...

My B17 doesn't have to endure the same weather as yours--I tuck my bike into the basement workshop for most of the December-to-March period.  There's a lot of Hard-Man mythology about Canajans--much of it self-glorifying, you may be sure--but we're now a very urbanized society, and I'd guess that the majority try to avoid weather like yours.  So, good on ya!

Quote
What do you rub into it?
  My LBS was out of stock on Proofide when I bought my saddle a couple of years ago, so I simply substituted Obenauf's Leather Treatment which I had on hand, sometimes in the "Leather Oil" form, sometimes the "HD" paste.  Obenauf's is a firm in the US Pacific northwest.  Have found their stuff to be exceptionally good--I learned about it on a hiking site, and use it on all my leather boots & shoes, jackets, and saddles.

Press on regardless, eh?

J.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 27, 2014, 08:59:33 PM
Took the Old Bird for a spin today and called in to the King's museum, Aberdeen University.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/TPVZpPKkW0B1p7HqTcXjLFzuylnhiEXq2BI7XIFlugA=w598-h797-no)

Plaque on outside showed the buildings date.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/SqiNgrvmCrLY6bFyzTXkddWD8sv7BBIKNJnU8_x91C8=w958-h719-no)

I always come away feeling quite humble after seeing such an old building.

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-OwZqk6teFzI/Uw-CLi1GIqI/AAAAAAAABgg/fbN-X8M__fE/w958-h719-no/P1000597.JPG)

They are running an exhibition at the moment showing North East Scotland's involvement in Fiji

http://www.abdn.ac.uk/museums/exhibitions/kings-museum.php

Anyone been to Fiji?

Matt

PS.
How do you do that thing were the link is hidden behind a word?
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: rualexander on February 27, 2014, 11:38:51 PM
Yes, spent three weeks touring in Fiji in 2002, when I was living in New Zealand, just before moving back to Scotland.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rualexander/sets/72157594471105998/
Great country with very friendly people, Bula! Bula!

To hide a link behind a word or phrase you need to enter it like this :
(url=insert link here) insert word or phrase here (/url)
But use square brackets instead of the round brackets I've used
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 27, 2014, 11:48:47 PM
Thanks for the tip.
I am using my Nexus 7 tablet at the moment.
Don't think its possible. But will try my  computer later.
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: StuntPilot on March 01, 2014, 09:11:37 PM
Matt

Great photos and great building! You are getting more sunshine than us here in the Borders. Maybe your move up north was a good one!

Went to Fiji many years ago. It was the second military coup with Colonel Rambuka in charge. Only six of us got off the plane. The place was deserted.

There were road blocks everywhere but the machine gun toting Fijian soldiers were very friendly thank goodness. We hired a car and rocked up to some five star hotel with a Swiss couple we met. The security guard poured us free drinks at the bar and let us use the swimming pool and beach as there was not a soul around! Surreal experience indeed. A great place Fiji whatever the political climate!

Richard
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 06, 2014, 03:55:00 PM
Thanks for the compliments on my snaps.
Just back from a wee morning ride around the lanes of sunny Scotlandshire.

Here's the old bird parked outside.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-CYL-skUQ3S4/UxhtfdOdBKI/AAAAAAAABmM/hyOkLl0eqiE/w598-h797-no/IMG_20140306_121520.jpg)

Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 06, 2014, 05:21:05 PM
Now *there* is a classic photo, Matt! Really nice job.

Your Old Bird is "old" just as a term of endearment and affection -- it has never looked fresher or more ready for anything!

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: alfie1952 on March 06, 2014, 05:41:38 PM
Hi Matt,

Lovely setting, showing off a lovely bike. Lambda pedals are the business.

Regards, Alfie
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on March 06, 2014, 07:53:44 PM
That's a super photo look's like a film set. to much rain here today for cycling or even walking.
roll on a good dry day so as i can get out for a decent spin on me bike. ::)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andre Jute on March 06, 2014, 08:46:27 PM
Such beautiful buildings, so well photographed.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: peter jenkins on March 07, 2014, 08:34:52 AM
Nice house you've got there, Matt.
Bet you don't see too many double glazing salesmen....

Cheers,

pj
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 07, 2014, 09:09:29 AM
Nice house you've got there, Matt.
Bet you don't see too many double glazing salesmen....

Cheers,

pj

Thanks Peter.
My post should have read, " outside a castle".
Not my house unfortunately.
Often wondered what its like inside a place like that.
Such small windows. Must be dark inside.
A couple of cars parked around the back indicated that the owners had a bob or two!
Not sure if it would be classified as a castle. There are quite a few in the area. I'll do some research.
Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on March 07, 2014, 04:07:28 PM
cost a feckin fortune to heat it i bet.still makes for a great photo.
i got a lovely 35 miles in this morning  ,very windy going out but a great spin home.
only problem i had besides nearly getting knocked by  car was i had bad indigestion for the intire 35 miles :'(
i took a few photos if there anyway good i will ask Dan to post them only thing my Raleigh is in one, must buy a thorn sticker that would qualify me to post photos of a super bike. ;D :) :)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: julk on March 07, 2014, 07:04:08 PM
Jags,
If you ask nicely, I am sure Dan could photoshop a Thorn logo onto your Raleigh bike photo ;D
julk.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on March 07, 2014, 08:06:06 PM
         yes i bet he could, i never thought of that one julian ;D ;D
i have a nice one on facebook from my spin today  ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 08, 2014, 02:00:32 AM
Will do,  jags. Just stepped in the door from an 85-miler. Heavy headwind the last 40 miles.

All the best, 

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on March 08, 2014, 12:03:07 PM
seen it Dan great job ,this was Julians idea so don't go blameing me  ;D ;D

wow that was a hell of a spin fair play to you, its been quiet a while since i did those kinda miles ,emm now that i recall it was when i did my so called Irish tour, we did 85 miles one of the days only because the clown i was with wanted to make the ferry in Dolin but as i discover later on it was for a very different reason ,i shall say no more  8)

ooops sorry Dan..

jags
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 29, 2014, 03:09:35 PM
Thinking about a new set of tires.

Not sure theses will fit...?

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-YrM1ufotOjs/UzbJ3w-jpYI/AAAAAAAAB-U/zZzJSUHuqr8/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140329_130930.jpg)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 29, 2014, 04:23:52 PM
Quote
Thinking about a new set of tires.

Not sure theses will fit...?
I think it will come down to a choice of tires /or/ mudguards, Matt. I have my doubts about both at once.

Best,

Dan. (...who ponders all questions nearly equally)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 29, 2014, 05:16:07 PM
A 3 Ton limit on this bridge.
Had me worried a few times - due to the gaps in the planks, more than my weight!

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-RyCkG3J9D8M/UzbvdKQZ8GI/AAAAAAAAB_w/bqeA7e4WT8Q/w958-h719-no/P1000775.JPG)

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-UU78SAZElE8/UzbuhYCjQoI/AAAAAAAAB_Q/PLPae58yP4Q/w958-h719-no/P1000774.JPG)

I must call in on the land owner and register a complaint.
I know where he lives.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-1eEEedA40Qs/UzbvMUpxOOI/AAAAAAAAB_o/I6oslaBJZec/w958-h719-no/P1000773.JPG)

 ;)
Title: You learn something new every day
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 04, 2014, 04:57:37 PM
Hands up who knew this when they woke up today?

A sign on the outside of Oldmeldrum Town Hall told me all about Forsythia.

I had stopped off for a coffee break 15 miles from home.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-MDlJtaSeWkw/Uz6b93_EBDI/AAAAAAAACB8/lsvsSssVGtk/w574-h765-no/IMG_20140404_120318.jpg)

Irrefutable proof that this is the best forum for learning something new every day.
The secret of happiness and long life. :D

Talking of long life.
Are these signs common outside UK?

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-QYZ3CfiSP50/Uz6brY5MftI/AAAAAAAACBk/2r2_ZQ5GnAU/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140404_120529.jpg)

Here's the Town Hall

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-FfcY-oVzf2I/Uz6boa2LQjI/AAAAAAAACBY/3d6p_pT5T-4/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140404_120432.jpg)

1877 if I decoded the Roman numerals above the door correctly

Whats the idea behind that? The Romans had long by then, I think?  ;)
Don't see it done on modern buildings nowadays.
Maybe they wanted to show off a bit?

How do you think MMIX
would look on the cross bar of my Raven?
 :D
Title: Re: You learn something new every day
Post by: Andre Jute on April 04, 2014, 05:53:05 PM
How do you think MMIX

Like you're a bicycling rapper pronounced Emm-Mix?
Title: Re: You learn something new every day
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 04, 2014, 07:10:41 PM
Like you're a bicycling rapper pronounced Emm-Mix?

Class.
 ;D
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on April 04, 2014, 07:59:49 PM
say matt i'll have you speaking with a drogheda accent before long  ;D ;D Class photos.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUgNG3MFHa4
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on April 04, 2014, 08:30:38 PM
Thanks my friend. I'll take that as a component. I think.

 :)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on April 04, 2014, 09:47:42 PM
 ;)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on May 02, 2014, 03:25:51 PM
Thinking about a new set of tires.

Not sure theses will fit...?

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-YrM1ufotOjs/UzbJ3w-jpYI/AAAAAAAAB-U/zZzJSUHuqr8/w958-h719-no/IMG_20140329_130930.jpg)

I really was planning a new set and after following a few threads here decided upon the 26x1.75 Marathon Plus Schwalbe in readiness for my summer tour to the four corners of Scotland.
I was replacing the same type that came with the bike 13 months ago from Andy.
In that time I have done 5,500 miles / 9,000 Km approx.
One puncture on the rear - and it was the rear that needed replacing ahead of the front.

Managed to buy x2 via ebay for £46.

Decided to replace just the rear today - since the front looks OK.

Here's the old and new next to each other before I removed the wheel.
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-kOWp6fXzM9g/U2Om3WOxUtI/AAAAAAAACu0/4WXRKy4jHDU/w640-h480-no/tirechange2014+001.jpg)

And here is the new one alone.
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-6Efky4AVDuw/U2Om6QLcJDI/AAAAAAAACu8/ihCFIv5wW_8/w640-h480-no/tirechange2014+002.jpg)

With the real wheel off I had the chance to clean up all those little areas around the rear axle that are hard to reach during a normal clean.

And here it is fitted.
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-zgQXLbqC4Gg/U2Om7s4c1vI/AAAAAAAACvE/KNDwQ9KZO_s/w640-h480-no/tirechange2014+004.jpg)

Here is the front one that I am letting run for a couple of months until just before my tour.
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-rb1fD-xCAFE/U2Om8DORtzI/AAAAAAAACvM/ITlw4wzfduA/w640-h480-no/tirechange2014+003.jpg)

I took the Old Bird for a spin after fitting the rear tire and could have sworn I was sitting higher than before.
A couple of cm perhaps - but it felt like more.
Anyone else had that sensation after fitting new tires?

Matt

(and a big thanks to everyone for their direct and indirect contribution to making it all go smoothly)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on May 02, 2014, 03:53:39 PM
hah at least you covered the floor up.i only chance doing work on the bike in the kitchen when the govener is fast aslep in bed. ;D
do you pump the tyres to max pressure matt.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on May 02, 2014, 04:01:43 PM
Tires at 35 Insh.
Normal for me.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on May 02, 2014, 04:10:53 PM
35psi  :oor are you windng anto up.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on May 02, 2014, 04:52:54 PM
30 psi...?
Pretty sure it was that.
Around 2 bar?
Someone correct me please.

After finishing the tire change it looked like rain so I gave the tire a quick pump. Checked it with my guage and hoped on for a spin. Tire was fine to touch.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on May 02, 2014, 05:08:49 PM
Hi Matt!

You surely managed some good use out of the old tires, and -- yes! -- I always do feel as if I am riding a bit higher on new tires. When I was a kid, I wore canvas tennis shoes and they'd always "go flat" and feel dead about the time I outgrew them (seemed like monthly at times). The new ones felt springy and fresh and I imagined I could leap tall buildings in a single bound. New tires are the bicycle version of that.  ;)

As for pressures, you're right in the ballpark for general riding with tires of that dimension. For unladen riding on my Nomad with 2.0 Schwalbe Duremes, I have settled on 29psi/2bar in front, 34psi/2.3bar at the rear and this has worked well for me in general use when riding unladen. Of course, I increase the pressures to just below or right at Andy Blance's recommended maximums when touring with a full expedition load. Everything in-between is on a case-by-case basis depending on weight carried and terrain. I'm having good luck with the Berto tire pressure app for Andorid, described here: http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=3798.msg58369#msg58369 It results in a pretty consistent 15% drop under load, which I've found ideal. The difficult part is finding a riding configuration that matches yours. It seems to be spot-on for me when I use the "French Randonneur" configuration, which most closely matches my Nomad's setup and my positioning on it.

Great photos as always, Matt!

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on May 02, 2014, 05:16:23 PM
this is what i didn't like about marathon plus no matter what pressure you put it the tyre always felt hard to the touch..35 i reckon isto little what is max on side of tyre.matt.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on May 02, 2014, 05:27:36 PM
Not at home with the bike at the moment, Jags.
I will report back Saturday.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on May 02, 2014, 05:38:24 PM
 ;) matt some people  like low psi i'm not one of them i like to  use the max  ;)


jags.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on May 02, 2014, 05:55:08 PM
Hi Anto!

Sometimes the maximum pressure listed on the sidewall isn't the maximum pressure that is safe for rims. Particularly with large-section tires and relatively narrow rims, pumping the tires up full exerts a *lot* of force against the rim sidewalls -- enough to split the rim asunder in some cases. A person can get away with less pressure in a larger-section tire casing because of the greater air volume. A narrower tire requires more pressure to prevent "snakebite" flats caused by the tube getting caught between the tire beads and the rim. For example, while I use F/R pressures of 29/34psi on the Nomad's 2in Duremes, my rando bike with 700x32C road slicks hums along at 80psi in both tires. A 15% drop under combined load of bike and rider is a good compromise between rolling resistance and comfort. My rando bike tires are a bit on the high side even at that. A person would never get away with such low pressures in a racing tire. As I recall, you ran 1.6in tires on your Sherpa. Those would require higher pressure than a 2.0 tire, thanks to the narrower cross-section and reduced air volume.

Back in the day (in this case, the late 1970s/early 1980s) when it was really difficult to get good *touring* tires in America and tubulars/sew-ups were a pain for touring, my father and I used to tour on early Specialized high-pressure wired-on training tires, and those were labeled optimistically for width. One set labeled 28mm were actually just 23mm in actual cross-section when calipered. When we toured with full loads on gravel, we pumped them up to 125psi. Anything less, and we were plagued by snakebite punctures. They road like they were made of steel bands, just like the "tires" used by pioneers' conestoga wagons on the Oregon Trail. I trace a lot of my present cycling-related hand nerve trauma to those days, but that's really all we had to ride with. The old large-section touring tires were hard to come by and when they did come available, were extremely short-lived.

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: jags on May 02, 2014, 06:26:32 PM
i guess i'm just using road bikes so tyres would always get pumped hard,for the life of me i cant remember what pressure i used on the supreams but i reckon what eve the max was thats what they got.ah well you learn something new every day. ;)


jags.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on May 02, 2014, 06:57:27 PM
The old girl got a new pair of tires, Schwalbe Marathon Supremes “HD Speed Guard” 26 x 1.6 at a relatively light 440 grams. These replace a pair of much heavier Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tour 26 x 1.75 tires that had incredibly lasted all four rides that I had done in Asia and Europe this trip.

Just saw the above  posted by Bill Wier on the crazy guy site.
He has just finished an Asian loop and is heading back to USA.
Looks like I have picked a pair of winners for my own tour.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on February 19, 2015, 11:41:15 PM
Hello folks.
I see my last posting was back in May 2014.
So here's an up-date.

New chain, front and rear sprockets and chain-glider fitted in October 2014
New handle bars and Rohloff shifter fitted Nov 2014.

Previous posts of mine have recorded these events and many thanks again to those of you who offered advice.

Today I changed both tires from 1.75 to 2.00
Schwalbe Marathon XR HD Ceramic Guard.

This is in preparation for my tour in late May to The Pamir Highway in Tajikistan.
2 months away on my dream adventure.
I'll start another topic on this tour nearer the time.

Here's is a snap of the front tire.
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-NOwKZl6Bx1A/VOZgBcyn1TI/AAAAAAAAHoM/YezHsPKGyxQ/w958-h719-no/Tyrechange%2B004.jpg)

A bit of a huff and puff to get on but I don't change many tires - so probably down to my inexperience.

Chainglider was tricky to remove - but to be fare, I hadn't removed it since I put in on last October. And I think most users would agree there it a knack to fitting them?

Here is the rear sprocket.
I am ashamed to say I have only done 400 miles on it - so it should look this good
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-BD2FZBjcnLI/VOZgmky-7NI/AAAAAAAAHok/9WtM0BRutDk/w958-h719-no/Tyrechange%2B005.jpg)

Here are 3 shots of the chain
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-8r6qGjTEGQ0/VOZgZYhRrMI/AAAAAAAAHoU/_YwQc6gY8iU/w580-h773-no/Tyrechange%2B003.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-B6yg4RlcH0A/VOZgfd0WUlI/AAAAAAAAHoc/DI3fT7n_2M4/w580-h773-no/Tyrechange%2B002.jpg)
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-vrbhJi2lFH4/VOZgtLhDiMI/AAAAAAAAHos/MpNorQ98L3E/w958-h719-no/Tyrechange%2B001.jpg)

It's a KMC X1.
Brand new. Not lubed my me before fitting.

Any thoughts? Inside the chainglider was some fine dust. Not dirty or wet in any way. Chain runs fine. Minimal to zero noise.

The only problem I had was fitting the rear wheel. The tire sat well on the wheel rims but did not appear a uniform fit around the side walls.
It had not been stored flat so was 'kinked' slightly before fitting.
The problem was the side wall rubbing slightly on the AXA lock. I had to readjust the lock further up the frame. And even now it's a close fit.
The tire runs free but I'll have to keep an eye on it.

I know some folk here are running long term tests on Chaingliders - so their comments would be appreciated.
Does the chain look in need of a lube?

Comments always welcome folks.

Regards form Aberdeen UK

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on February 20, 2015, 10:03:35 AM
Thanks for the update Matt, must be exciting getting ready for the big trip!  I've done lots of riding in Europe but nothing like that! 

On the chain: yes it needs lubrication.  IME you need to lube much less frequently with a chainglider but I think you'd need to be a light user with a dry shed to use none at all.  The rust is probably down to condensation.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 10, 2015, 06:40:42 PM
Thanks for the good wishes geocycle.

I am presently going over the whole bike in detail so as to avoid any silly mistakes and errors while away.
On my last 30 day trip around Scotland, on the 3rd day my front sprocket stripped itself and would not engage the chain.
Of course, as soon as I returned home I did exactly what I should have done before departing; fitted new front and rear sprockets, plus chain.
They had been on the bike for 2 years, and the bike came second hand - so goodness knows how many miles were on the clocks!

So this weeks jobs: Refit Axa lock, renew Swisstop brake pads and take a look at the EBB.
( I peaked at the EBB a few months ago and noted it was very pitted and worn.
Dan kindly informed me that the EBB part I have requires an internal cartridge bottom bracket and a removal tool.

Anyway, here is how today went.
Easy jobs first.
Swisstop brake pads. A set came with the bike but I took a look at the sets for sale on SJS.
As much as I like them, I have always found them bad in the wet. And think I have picked up on other folk saying the same thing.
And also, I believe that SJS only fit them to one wheel on bikes they now sell?
But here is a quote for the sales pitch:
We have confirmed that they offer long life and good braking in wet or dry conditions

Any comments?

The job went well and the old ones looked very skinny compared to the new ones now on.

Next job the Axa.
It's been on the bike since day one and I am a big fan.
However after fitting 2" Schwalbe tires there was rubbing - no matter how I tweaked them, up, down sideways.
I even went I bought a new set of fitments - but to no avail.
They are fiddly to fit, with a mudguard on. I had the wheel off but it appeared that the wide guards I have on SKS Chromoplastic 26 Inch Mudguards are just too wide for the opening of the Axa. It's the black fitting inserts that appear to rub the tires.
I was using 1.75 inch tires. The fit was close then - so I think 2 inch is too big for me.
Dan ( a better man ) has succeeded with 2 inch. But I'm beat.

This is not good news for my tour since the Axa has always given me a great sense of safety security.
I will now have to rethink my lock arrangements.

Next job for tomorrow will be exploring the EBB.

Many thanks for those who have offered advice.
All comments greatly appreciated.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on March 10, 2015, 08:02:41 PM
I have the swiss stop blue pads on CSS rims. Yeah, I find braking in the wet to be poor. The other day I was out and got a bunch of snow packed in around the brakes. Wow, considerably worse! When it's just wet, I find that I can ride the brakes lightly for a minute or so and then the brakes will have skimmed off the water and the braking power comes back. I guess with all that snow, there was always more water melting onto the rim. I did manage to slow down eventually but it was a bit of a fright.

These days I am using an Abus Bordo folding lock. I am just using the combination lock at this point. Not super secure but I don't leave my bike for a long time or in very dangerous places. I really like the way it can be stored compactly on the bike. I have the Granite-X or whatever it's called, the heavy high security version, stashed away. I hope I am smart enough to switch to that before I discover that I should have! 

(http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r6/kukulaj/Nomad/IMG_2253_zpsd6b2843c.jpg)

If you want a frame lock, I think the Abus Amparo has a touch more room than the Axa. See:

http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=4148.0
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: martinf on March 10, 2015, 09:40:22 PM
If you want a frame lock, I think the Abus Amparo has a touch more room than the Axa. See:
http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=4148.0

I have an Abus Ampero on my old mountain bike with 2.0" Marathon Supremes and 65 mm width Chromoplastic mudguards (as sold by SJS on their Raven Tour and Nomad bikes). In Thorn terms, the frame geometry seems to be between Raven Tour and Nomad.

Not yet put a frame lock on either of my Thorns. I intend to fit one on my "utility"  Raven Tour, which is mainly used for local errands. Not yet sure I want one on the "touring" Raven Tour, as I probably need a U-lock for relatively secure parking on tour.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on March 10, 2015, 11:14:36 PM
Hi Matt, I must be one of the lucky ones who have not had problems with swissstop blue pads. Even in wet weather they have been ok and comparable to other rims and pads.  But Jim is right that slushy snow is probably the worse for stopping.  Current recommendation at SJS is for an ordinary rim on the front with standard blocks and CSS rims on the back with swissstop Blues.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 11, 2015, 12:32:00 AM
Thanks folks. Lots of tips already.
Abus looks good. I'll compare it size wise to the Axa.

When I come back from my tour I will return to the 1.75 tires. Plenty of life left in them. And hopefully refit the Axa.

I am touring with 3 others so security will be a little better than being alone.
But I must drag along some kind of U lock I guess.

The Swosstops I had on were pretty worn so maybe these new ones will impress me in the wet.

EBB fun tomorrow.

Matt


Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 11, 2015, 01:15:18 PM
Day 2
Took a look at the EBB

Quite a bit of time was spent removing the front part of the Chainglider. It's a job not done often since the rear wheel comes off with just the 2 rear parts removed.

Here is where I got to before I ran out of time and had to put everything back together.
For some reason the chain appeared twisted and I only solved the problem by breaking the chain and re threading it correctly through the frame.
I'll have to pay more attention next time I take things apart

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/ocU-ZPEK431Ch00FN58qfYnwv7v6zOYN7u5wIDFLEtE=w958-h719-no)

And another shot
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/mPpFAifUVdssZg2kSEwFFXYBKV2pX72-J12JNdvar7w=w958-h719-no)

What do I need to do next to slide the EBB out?

Here are the tools I have
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/NDChYqWUSpfDu4n_m3bViU2d8yYk2kfT6BJ0v6PgcSQ=w958-h719-no)

Many thanks folks

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on March 11, 2015, 02:06:29 PM
I think you'll want to pull the crank arms off the bottom bracket axle first, then pull the bottom bracket axle and bearings out of the EBB. Sliding the EBB out of the frame would be the last step. That's what I understood from Dan and it sure sounds like a smart approach.

I'm waiting another week or two for the snow and ice to be finished and then I will be doing a bit of work myself... take off the studded tires, but then I am putting on a chainglider. New chainring, sprocket, and chain for the chainglider to protect! Do I need any thin little spacers for the chainring bolts to clamp properly the thinner new steel chainring versus the alloy chainring I have on there now? I am assuming that popping the chainglider on is easy... curious that getting it back off wasn't so easy!
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: John Saxby on March 11, 2015, 03:09:56 PM
Quote
Do I need any thin little spacers for the chainring bolts to clamp properly the thinner new steel chainring versus the alloy chainring I have on there now?

Jim, depending on which crank arm & spider you have (I have Sugino XD2's), 6 mm long chainring bolts should do the job of mating the alloy spider foot to the stainless ring, with no washers necessary. You can get Stronglight cro-moly bolts from SJSC (I installed these over the winter, replacing the alloy ones I used to have); Peter White also sells the Stronglight bolts, since he now offers Sugino XD2 crank arms/spiders.  Problemsolver also offer stainless 6mm bolts as well as the alloy items.

Hope that's helpful -- let me know if you need the part #s or any of those.

Good luck with all this, John

PS:  finally, a break in winter here -- it was 10 degrees yesterday!  Heard some crows for the first time (about 2-3 weeks later than usual), a reliable sign that spring really will come.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 11, 2015, 05:22:20 PM
Quote
I think you'll want to pull the crank arms off the bottom bracket axle first, then pull the bottom bracket axle and bearings out of the EBB. Sliding the EBB out of the frame would be the last step.
Yep!

...and if you find the EBB is "reluctant" to leave its little nest, there's help for that as well:
http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/removingseizedeccentric.html
More on the topic here, should it rear its ugly head:
http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/forums/index.php?topic=2828.0

I think I'd use this as an opportunity to clean up and would spritz a bit of penetrating oil on the chainring sleeve nuts (they appear captive in the alloy crank spider) and don't forget the grease/anti-seize when reassembling.

By the way, you won't have to completely remove the EBB retaining screws to remove the insert, but this would be a good time to lube the threads with anti-seize for easier adjustment in future.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 11, 2015, 07:38:35 PM
Thanks Dan.
Just talk me through that last part.

I have never removed the EBB or bottom bracket cassette.

Yep. Grease it if it moves is my motto.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on March 11, 2015, 08:21:30 PM
Might be a good place for me to repeat my little trick for adjusting the EBB. My trick doesn't really work on the first chain but then later on it helps preserve the EBB.

The trick with making the EBB work is that you want to keep the indents distinct that are made by those big grub bolts. Every time you adjust the EBB to snug up the chain or to put on a new chain, you want those bolts to come down right into an existing indent, or to make a fresh indent that won't touch an existing indent.

What I do is to pull one of those grub bolts all the way out and then use a headlamp to help me peer down into that hole so I can see the existing indents. I wrestle with the EBB position a bit, so the chain has just a little slack and either an existing indent is square at the bottom of the hole or well off to one side or the other. I can finger tighten the other grub bolt down - the indents from the two bolts should all match up - then I can put back in the bolt I had removed. Of course I regrease this bolt first!

If I am lucky, I toggle back and forth between the two bolts as I shift the EBB every six months or whatever it is. That way both bolts get a regular regreasing. But certainly, when you are replacing the EBB, might as well regrease both of them!
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 11, 2015, 09:20:06 PM
Excellent suggestion from JimK, Matt; it would pay to heed it.

Okay...here's the basic steps:

1) Remove both crank arms using your crank puller.

2) Using the BB cartridge socket, start on the left side and remove the left cup/retaining ring, following these directions to remove the BB cartridge:
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/cartridge-bearing-type-bottom-bracket-service-bbt

3) Loosen (or remove, if you wish to regrease them) both EBB retaining bolts.

4) Remove the EBB insert from the bike's BB shell.

That'll get everything clear to where you can clean it up and regrease/re-antiseize, ready for reassembly. Reassembly is the reverse of the above steps: Insert new EBB, secure with bolts, insert BB cartridge and torque tight to specs, mount crank arms and tighten to specs, replace chain, tension chain.

An additional suggestion in preparation for your long tour: Chains stretch on long tours, and sometimes they eventually stretch so much you can't take up the slack anymore by adjusting the eccentric. Instead, you have to remove a link pair and shorten the chain, then start over with the eccentric adjustment. Typically, the need for this task will make itself known during pounding rain and a headwind while climbing a steep hill in exposed country with no cover. It is then you'll be glad you took advance care to prep your chain with *two* quick-links on either side of an inner link so you can simply remove the spare section of chain and connector and -- voila! -- it is now short enough to once again snug things up leaving the proper slack using the eccentric. Sure saves a lot of time and aggravation when it really counts.

I learned this the hard way, deep in the middle of very rural Romania.

I shortened the chain and the factory mushroomed pin promptly dropped into deep grass. No problem, I had a quick-link. Big problem, the link was for 9-sp and Andy's bike turned out to have an 8-sp chain. All my spare quick-links were for 9-sp as were the ones he kindly provided as additional spares. 0.1mm can make a big difference at such times, as the quick-link just won't close without persuasion greater than a thumb and finger.

I owe the continuance of my tour (and avoidance of what would have been a 190km round trip bus ride plus lengthy hike to the nearest bike shop in C?l?ra?i) to a very kindly farmer who had access to a pair of pliers that allowed the connector to compress and then slide. To thank him for 150 minutes of his time, I went to the village store and bought him five of their best imported chocolate bars. When we met by accident a second time on my return trip, he greeted me with kisses on each cheek and forehead, a hug and hearty handshakes and called me Brother. He thought he'd never see me again after we parted the first time and had been very concerned about my safety and welfare. Those events make for some wonderfully Adventurous tour memories, but can be stressful at the time. Save yourself some hassle and take a variety of quick-links, just in case you need to buy a replacement chain along the way. Not all chains come with quick-link connectors and those can save the day if they're the right width. Be sure to save any chain links that need to be removed for sizing. They're "gold" if needed later for repairs. And be sure to properly thank anyone who helps you along the way and afterwards.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 11, 2015, 09:55:48 PM
Thanks Dan.
Especially for the chain link tip.
I will do it and carry a couple of spares!

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: brummie on March 11, 2015, 10:14:15 PM
With regards the poor braking in the wet: below is a post from the CTC forum which maybe of interest ( I replaced my Carbide rims with plain alloy Grizzly, but may relace the Carbide once the alloy ones have worn & try the Salmon pads ( which ARE excellent on my current alloy rims.)

Re: Grizzley CSS Rims: (very) long term report

Postby 531colin » Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:35 pm
Got carbide Grizzleys on a couple of bikes for roughstuff.
When my wet braking deteriorated, I figured the rims were smooth enough to use KoolStop Salmon.....and they are! and they stop!
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 12, 2015, 05:55:13 PM
Day 3
Well, if it can go wrong.....

Decided to take another look at the crank removal job.
Thanks Dan for the tips.
However I forgot to disconnect the shifter cables before removing the rear wheel.
One of the wires popped out of the end tip holder.
I managed to undo the 2 grub screws and refit the wire but it was touch n go.
Chainglider off and -----
Well, my confidence had gone after making the silly mistake with the cable and I'm pretty sure I don't have the correct tools for the job.
Took a good look at the underneath - checked the 2 retaining bolts for the EBB - no play or untoward sounds from the cassette - so I'll leave well alone.

Only good thing from the work today is that I feel I can now give a masterclass in Chainglider fitting and removal. ;)

Nice to be able to work inside!
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-T4BQUmt1sSQ/VQHEPrmr5tI/AAAAAAAAHwg/7XS6zBptug4/w958-h719-no/Tyrechange.jpg)

Did I mention, Mrs. Matt is away?
 ;D ;D


Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: julk on March 12, 2015, 06:33:04 PM
Matt,
Sorry to hear that the job is still underway,
raising the bike up a bit, say on the sofa, would make working on it a bit easier ;D
Julian.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 12, 2015, 07:25:05 PM
...and that end table with the picture on it would level things out nicely...give a good, solid surface for the handlebars with the rest on the couch as Julian suggests. Covering the table could make things slippy, so best leave it bare. What could happen?

All the best,

Dan. (...who reminds you there is no crisis of confidence, just falling back to regroup; you'll do fine)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: John Saxby on March 12, 2015, 10:33:08 PM
Quote
I can now give a masterclass in Chainglider fitting and removal.

Useful skill, Matt--more people, in more places, & more frequently, will fit & remove their 'gliders than their (E)BBs.  And the cred's important, too:  as their users know, & envious onlookers suspect, 'gliders are really in the realm of magic rather than mere mechanics.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on March 12, 2015, 11:29:02 PM
Matt,
Sorry to hear that the job is still underway,
raising the bike up a bit, say on the sofa, would make working on it a bit easier ;D
Julian.

Imagine how clean the chainglider would be it went in the dishwasher! Endless possibilities for interior bike maintenance.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: geocycle on March 12, 2015, 11:33:47 PM
Sympathies regarding the Rohloff cables. Those grub screws are too tiny. I also don't blame you regarding the BB. I couldn't shift the one on my original rohloff. It could just be an if it ain't broke moment...
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on March 13, 2015, 01:01:33 AM
Matt,

I don't want to egg you on past your comfort limit, but I'm a big believer in regular, preventive maintenance.

If you could tackle some of these jobs at home with the local bike shop available as a bailout option, that seems better than doing it roadside in the Karakorams, for example.  :P

All the best,

Dan. (...who just *knows* if he didn't act in advance, the marginal parts would let loose in the Middle of Nowhere).
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: JimK on March 13, 2015, 03:38:48 AM
-more people, in more places, & more frequently, will fit & remove their 'gliders than their (E)BBs. 

Since I am nearing my own transition to gliderhood, here is a question for the experts: with my naked chain, it is pretty easy just to take a look to see how much chain slack there is, and very easy to measure with enough precision... sometimes I wait until my chain falls off, but I prefer to snug up the EBB before that point.

So, with a chainglider, what is the easiest way to figure out when the chain needs to be tightened? With the chainglider, maybe the system can tolerate a lot more slack. Seems like the chain won't fall off so easily with the glider to hold it in place. Is there any other downside to a very slack chain?
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on March 13, 2015, 09:08:45 AM
I'm a slack man as well.
The chainglider covers up everything very well, so there is no easy way to peak inside.
All I can say is that after removing a few times its pretty easy to do.
For me it was just a case oof getting my head around how it fits together and how to tweak the catches that clip it together.

I guess a slacker chain will rub inside more but I haven't hear any such sound on my set up.

So, the easiest ( only?) Way is to take a look.
And I guess there is less like the chain will pop off. Without the 'glider I had that happen to me several times.

Matt
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: julk on March 13, 2015, 03:58:11 PM
Guys,
After some time using a chainglider I have never had to tighten the chain up.
I suspect the chainglider keeps the chain so clean and well lubricated that it (the chain) forgets to wear out and stays almost the same length.
Another benefit…

Andre,
Any feedback as the longest user?

Julian.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: John Saxby on March 13, 2015, 05:13:53 PM
Jim, Matt, my experience with the 'glider is limited to a shortened season of riding in 2014, and about 3000 kms, all with a new Raven and a new chain.

When I checked my chain last autumn, it was 15 mms beyond Thorn's maximum recommended play of 60 mm as shown in the "Thorn Bikes Owners Manual, p. 9, "Adjusting eccentric bottom brackets". (Note:  I didn't measure the play in the chain when I took delivery of the bike in late April last year, so i can't say how much the new chain stretched over the season.)  I adjusted the EBB to bring the play below the 40 mm lower mark recommended in the manual. 

By the simpler method of checking the play midway between the two sprockets, it's now about 15 mm at the tight spot (happily, the tight spot isn't very pronounced.)

The 'glider does a good job, I reckon, of keeping the chain on the sprockets where it belongs.  Most on my kms were done on tarmac roads, with the usual frost-heave jounces on Canajan roads, but for the most part, me, the bike, and the chain were not subjected to serious shocks or bounces.

I'd say that checking the chain's tension when you change the Rohloff's oil should do the trick--annually or every 5000 kms or so.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 11, 2015, 06:08:40 PM
https://goo.gl/photos/CRf3zUtjq3bKBEM47 (https://goo.gl/photos/CRf3zUtjq3bKBEM47)

Does this work?

Or this
https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipPH3MWKmaqifUhFXU9Ij_5OQwJ2suQbH1BxA8LK/photo/AF1QipNXdBbGN5izMvIECeJEawhjyyPWMcwHwkifurAE

Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on October 11, 2015, 06:20:21 PM
Matt,

For me on a variety of devices, the first link directly connects to a photo at the other end. It "works".

The second one brings me to the sign-in gateway to my Google account and then to an 404 Error page (file not found). It "doesn't work".

Neither link results in an embedded photo being displayed in your post. For that, you'd need to compose your post using an inline image tag linked to the photo where it is stored on another site elsewhere.

Best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andre Jute on October 11, 2015, 10:52:05 PM
Same here. First links shows a movie, second link a not-found 404.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 12, 2015, 10:39:07 AM
Time lapse now.

Out on Sunday past, in Aberdeenshire UK
Good farming land. Hay making and slurry spreading.

Hope you don't mind if I continue to experiment here?
Steep learning curve for me

Helps if you slow the playback speed - lower right control on screen.
Not quite sure how to edit that into the clip my end. I think there is a button to click so will try that next time

https://goo.gl/photos/cScWJGNfYQA3b9Cu5 (https://goo.gl/photos/cScWJGNfYQA3b9Cu5)
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on October 12, 2015, 10:56:04 AM
Viewable, Matt, but no speed controls at my end...it went by pretty fast.

You can always delete your practice posts later once you get the hang of things.

ATB,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 12, 2015, 11:02:51 AM
Thanks Dan.
I'll try that slow down button in the edit stage.

I'm not that fast a rider! Too many roses and too much slurry to smell.

I sure do like cycling the back roads and watching the farmers at work. I knew many several years ago and its a hard life. Not easy making a living from the land.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 12, 2015, 03:20:33 PM
Time lapse again

I'll need to seek assistance on the playback speed.
This one is slower, slightly.


https://goo.gl/photos/LLSHnBjXUrnd3tZW9 (https://goo.gl/photos/LLSHnBjXUrnd3tZW9)


Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on October 12, 2015, 03:35:06 PM
Another thought, Matt...why not set the interval shorter so you're inserting frames between what you have? That should also reduce the apparent speed a bit while showing more "snapshots" along the way.

ATB,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 13, 2018, 10:02:41 AM
New picture size ok?
Old Bird taking a break from the hot Ethiopian sun.
56 Kb
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: John Saxby on October 13, 2018, 04:07:26 PM
Well-earned, Matt, I'd say.  Owner also taking a break from the hills, maybe a meal of injera and wat, washed down with a glass or two of tej?  (Followed by a nap?)

Cheers,  John
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Danneaux on October 13, 2018, 04:19:16 PM
Picture size is more than okay, Matt; well on the right side of things. You can go larger in filesize if needed. Even a bump-up to about 200kB would give you a nice size and quality that still loads fast and fits parameters.

The Old Bird is looking great -- as usual!

All the best,

Dan.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 13, 2018, 05:01:00 PM
Well-earned, Matt, I'd say.  Owner also taking a break from the hills, maybe a meal of injera and wat, washed down with a glass or two of tej?  (Followed by a nap?)

Cheers,  John

Sounds like youv'e been there?
Or maybe read my journal?
https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=1mr&doc_id=20467&v=T2
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 13, 2018, 05:02:54 PM
Picture size is more than okay, Matt; well on the right side of things. You can go larger in filesize if needed. Even a bump-up to about 200kB would give you a nice size and quality that still loads fast and fits parameters.

The Old Bird is looking great -- as usual!

All the best,

Dan.

Thanks Dan. I was using a new app on my Android phone so thought I'd be cautious with the sizing. I'll try one a size up next time.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 13, 2018, 07:46:09 PM
Here we are in Essaouira, Morocco.
I was out in the sand dunes locating a geocach.
The 1.75 Marathons were just about ok.
The old bird had certainly been around the block a few times.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 14, 2018, 02:24:20 PM
Here we are in Scotlandshire. Half way between the Shetland Islands and Mull of Galloway. An end to end of Scotters via the Western Isles and Eigg.
Only slight disappointment was not being able to visit St Kilda due to high sea swell.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Andre Jute on October 20, 2018, 11:56:34 AM
The pair of you really look the business, Matt, purposeful.
Title: Re: Matt's old bird
Post by: Matt2matt2002 on October 20, 2018, 05:23:34 PM
Thanks Andre.
I copied the pose from Pushbikegirl. She's been on the road for years.